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I am studying overriding member functions in JAVA and thought about experimenting with overriding member variables.

So, I defined classes

public class A{
    public int intVal = 1;
    public void identifyClass()
    {
        System.out.println("I am class A");
    }
}

public class B extends A
{
    public int intVal = 2;
    public void identifyClass()
    {
        System.out.println("I am class B");
    }
}

public class mainClass
{
    public static void main(String [] args)
    {
        A a = new A();
        B b = new B();
        A aRef;
        aRef = a;
        System.out.println(aRef.intVal);
        aRef.identifyClass();
        aRef = b;
        System.out.println(aRef.intVal);
        aRef.identifyClass();
    }
}

The output is:

1
I am class A
1
I am class B

I am not able to understand why when aRef is set to b intVal is still of class A?

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5 Answers 5

Variables are not polymorphic in Java; they do not override one another.

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So, as a variable is not overridden, no run time resolution is done for them, hence in the inheritance chain the variable value of the reference class is used when accessed instead of the object type. I verified it with extending the classes further and using an intermediate reference type. Thanks for the reply. –  user1412858 May 23 '12 at 15:58

When you make a variable of the same name in a subclass, that's called hiding. The resulting subclass will now actually have both properties. You can access the one from the superclass with super.var or ((SuperClass)this).var. The variables don't even have to be of the same type; they are just two variables sharing a name, much like two overloaded methods.

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Thanks for the reply. –  user1412858 May 23 '12 at 16:06

Variables are resolved compile-time, methods run-time. The aRef is of type A, therefore aRef.Intvalue is compile-time resolved to 1.

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Thanks for the reply –  user1412858 May 23 '12 at 16:30

As per the Java specifications, instance variables are not inherited from a super class when it is extended.

Hence the variable in the sub class only can be seen as one sharing the same name. Also when the constructor of A is called during the instance creation of B the variable intVal is initialized and hence the output.

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I didn't get the first point. We can always access any non private member variables of a super class in a subclass. –  user1412858 May 23 '12 at 16:34

Well, I hope u got the answer. If not, you can try seeing in the debug mode. the subclass B has access to both the intVal. They are not polymorphic hence they are not overriden.

If you use B's reference you will get B's intVal. If you use A's reference , you will get A's intVal. It's that simple.

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In the debug mode I see that both b and aRef have both the intVal s whereas as per your comment I expected that only object b will have both the values. Is it because the debugger behaves in a different way than the JVM? –  user1412858 May 23 '12 at 16:05
    
I guess there was a misunderstanding. Till the time u didn't assign b to aRef, it had only one intVal. When you assigned b to aRef, now it is pointing to an object of type B hence two intVals. –  dharam May 23 '12 at 16:09
    
Thanks for the reply –  user1412858 May 23 '12 at 16:15

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