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on fedora 16, running time(1) on a small program that just does 10 writes of 1024 bytes to a file, reports "24 outputs". I was expecting the I/O count to be 10. Note that if i run strace on the program I can see the 10 write() calls. So what is the I/O count as reported by time(1)? thanks a lot

#!/usr/bin/python

import os
import pdb

SIZE_IO=1024
IONB=10

def test1(file):
    #pdb.set_trace()
    buffer= '\x01' * SIZE_IO
    fd = os.open(file, os.O_CREAT|os.O_RDWR, 0777)
    for ix in range(IONB):
        len = os.write(fd, buffer)
        print len
    os.close(fd)
    return 1

if name__== "__main":
    test1("ttt.txt")
    print 'ok'
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Please show us the command you ran as well as the "small program". –  robert May 23 '12 at 14:35
    
#!/usr/bin/python import os SIZE_IO=1024 IONB=10 def test1(file): #pdb.set_trace() buffer= '\x01' * SIZE_IO fd = os.open (file, os.O_CREAT|os.O_RDWR, 0777) for ix in range(IONB): len = os.write(fd, buffer) os.close(fd) return 1 if name__== "__main": test1("ttt.txt") print 'ok' –  jfas May 23 '12 at 14:52
    
And the time command you used, with output? Also, please verify my formatting. –  robert May 23 '12 at 14:52
    
/usr/bin/time ./template.py 0.10user 0.02system 0:00.13elapsed 98%CPU (0avgtext+0avgdata 4700maxresident)k 0inputs+24outputs (0major+1308minor)pagefaults 0swaps –  jfas May 23 '12 at 14:53
1  
I have no idea how to format that. Please put it in your question. –  robert May 23 '12 at 15:04
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2 Answers 2

Isn't each print going to cause a write as well?

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Hi, removing the print() has no impact..count stays the same –  jfas May 23 '12 at 15:22
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excerpt from the ACCURACY section in time(1) manpage :

The '%I' and '%O' values are allegedly only 'real' input and output and do not include those supplied by caching devices. The meaning of 'real' I/O reported by '%I' and '%O' may be muddled for workstations, especially diskless ones.

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