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In Oracle 9.2.0.8, I need to return a record set where a particular field (LAB_SEQ) is at a maximum (it is a sequential VARCHAR array '0001', '0002', etc.) for each of another field (WO_NUM). To select the maximum, I am attempting to order in descending order and select the first row. Everything I can find on StackOverflow suggests that the only way to do this is with a correlated subquery. Then I use this maximum in the WHERE clause of the outer query to get the row I want for each WO_NUM:

SELECT lt.WO_NUM, lt.EMP_NUM, lt.LAB_END_DATE, lt.LAB_END_TIME
FROM LAB_TIM lt WHERE lt.LAB_SEQ = (
   SELECT LAB_SEQ FROM (
      SELECT lab.LAB_SEQ FROM LAB_TIM lab WHERE lab.CCN='1' AND MAS_LOC='1'
          AND lt.WO_NUM = lab.WO_NUM ORDER BY ROWNUM DESC
   ) WHERE ROWNUM=1
)

However, this returns an invalid identifier for lt.WO_NUM error. Research suggests that ORacle 8 only allows correlated subqueries one level deep, and suggests rewriting to avoid the subquery - something which discussion of selecting maximums suggests can't be done. Any help getting this statement to execute would be greatly appreciated.

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3  
Ordering by ROWNUM isn't terribly useful here. –  DCookie May 23 '12 at 15:23

2 Answers 2

Your correlated subquery would need to be something like

SELECT lt.WO_NUM, lt.EMP_NUM, lt.LAB_END_DATE, lt.LAB_END_TIME
FROM LAB_TIM lt WHERE lt.LAB_SEQ = (
   SELECT max(lab.LAB_SEQ)
     FROM LAB_TIM lab 
    WHERE lab.CCN='1' AND MAS_LOC='1'
      AND lt.WO_NUM = lab.WO_NUM 
  )

Since you are on Oracle 9.2, it will probably be more efficient to use a correlated subquery. I'm not sure what the predicates lab.CCN='1' AND MAS_LOC='1' are doing in your current query so I'm not quite sure how to translate them into the analytic function approach. Is the combination of LAB_SEQ and WO_NUM not unique in LAB_TIM? Do you need to add in the predicates on CCN and MAS_LOC in order to get a single unique row for every WO_NUM? Or are you using those predicates to decrease the number of rows in your output? The basic approach will be something like

SELECT *
  FROM (SELECT lt.WO_NUM, 
               lt.EMP_NUM, 
               lt.LAB_END_DATE, 
               lt.LAB_END_TIME,
               rank() over (partition by wo_num
                                order by lab_seq desc) rnk
          FROM LAB_TIM lt)
   WHERE rnk = 1

but it's not clear to me whether CCN and MAS_LOC need to be added to the ORDER BY clause in the analytic function or whether they need to be added to the WHERE clause.

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1  
+1, although 8i already had analytics :) –  Vincent Malgrat May 23 '12 at 15:23
    
@VincentMalgrat - You're right-- looks like that was introduced in 8.1.6. –  Justin Cave May 23 '12 at 15:27
    
Thanks, Justin. While this accomplishes my goal, it suffers drastic inefficiency. Since the max() function will iterate through every entry in the table (which is large), I'd like to take advantage of the fact that the rows are, in fact, in order. I would think sorting by ROWNUM would be more efficient than the LAB_SEQ, since comparing strings is time-consuming. The query you've suggested has been running now for about 5 minutes, with no end in sight. –  user1412922 May 23 '12 at 15:30
    
@user1412922 - Rows in a heap organized table are inherently in no order until you supply an ORDER BY clause. Ordering by ROWNUM is equivalent to omitting the ORDER BY clause and will return the data in an arbitrary order. In very controlled environments (data is never deleted or updated, only one session ever inserts the data at a time, data is never exported, objects are never reorganized, parallel query is never used) data will generally be returned in the order that it is inserted by that behavior should not be relied upon. If the problem is performance, what indexes exist? –  Justin Cave May 23 '12 at 15:34
    
I take that back, your subsequent query worked well, with less than a minute to run. Thank you for your help! On a side note, I've checked and our DBMS is actually at 9i release 9.2.0.8. Do any additional efficiencies come to mind introduced then? –  user1412922 May 23 '12 at 15:34

This is one case where a correlated subquery is better, particularly if you have indexes on the table. However, it should be possible to rewrite correlated subqueries as joins.

I think the following is equivalent, without the correlated subquery:

SELECT lt.WO_NUM, lt.EMP_NUM, lt.LAB_END_DATE, lt.LAB_END_TIME
FROM (select *, rownum as r
      from LAB_TIM lt
     ) lt join
     (select wo_num, max(r) as maxrownum
      from (select LAB_SEQ, wo_num, rownum as r
            from LAB_TIM lt
            where lab.CCN = '1' AND MAS_LOC = '1'
           ) 
     ) ltsum
     on lt.wo_num = ltsum.wo_num and
        lt.r = ltsum.maxrownum

I'm a little unsure about how Oracle works with rownums in things like ORDER BY.

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