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I've made such experiment - made 10 million random numbers from C and C#. And then counted how much times each bit from 15 bits in random integer is set. (I chose 15 bits because C supports random integer only up to 0x7fff).

What i've got is this: enter image description here
I have two questions:

  1. Why there are 3 most probable bits ? In C case bits 8,10,12 are most probable. And in C# bits 6,8,11 are most probable.

  2. Also seems that C# most probable bits is mostly shifted by 2 positions then compared to C most probable bits. Why is this ? Because C# uses other RAND_MAX constant or what ?


My test code for C:

void accumulateResults(int random, int bitSet[15]) {
    int i;
    int isBitSet;
    for (i=0; i < 15; i++) {
        isBitSet = ((random & (1<<i)) != 0);
        bitSet[i] += isBitSet;
    }
}

int main() {
    int i;
    int bitSet[15] = {0};
    int times = 10000000;
    srand(0);

    for (i=0; i < times; i++) {
        accumulateResults(rand(), bitSet);
    }

    for (i=0; i < 15; i++) {
        printf("%d : %d\n", i , bitSet[i]);
    }

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

And test code for C#:

static void accumulateResults(int random, int[] bitSet)
{
    int i;
    int isBitSet;
    for (i = 0; i < 15; i++)
    {
        isBitSet = ((random & (1 << i)) != 0) ? 1 : 0;
        bitSet[i] += isBitSet;
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int i;
    int[] bitSet = new int[15];
    int times = 10000000;
    Random r = new Random();

    for (i = 0; i < times; i++)
    {
        accumulateResults(r.Next(), bitSet);
    }

    for (i = 0; i < 15; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} : {1}", i, bitSet[i]);
    }

    Console.ReadKey();
}

Very thanks !! Btw, OS is Windows 7, 64-bit architecture & Visual Studio 2010.

EDIT
Very thanks to @David Heffernan. I made several mistakes here:

  1. Seed in C and C# programs was different (C was using zero and C# - current time).
  2. I didn't tried experiment with different values of Times variable to research reproducibility of results.

Here's what i've got when analyzed how probability that first bit is set depends on number of times random() was called: enter image description here
So as many noticed - results are not reproducible and shouldn't be taken seriously. (Except as some form of confirmation that C/C# PRNG are good enough :-) ).

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2  
I can't remember much from my statistics classes back in school, but you need to find out if the outliers are statistically significant or simply a result of random error. You are never going to get a perfect distribution. –  Mike Weller May 23 '12 at 15:21
3  
Are these results reproducible? That would surprise me. If you run the same test multiple times, I suspect that on subsequent runs, different bits will come out "more probable" and "less probable". –  abelenky May 23 '12 at 15:22
4  
I just realised that the scale on the graph isn't 0 to 1000000 but plus/minus a fraction of a percent. I'm a lot less surprised now. –  Rawling May 23 '12 at 15:24
1  
Lying with statistics is fun! See the part about the "mislead-O-tron". –  Li-aung Yip May 23 '12 at 15:27
4  
By the way, it's probably better to plot data like this as a bar graph, not a line graph. The lines are visually suggestive of relationships between neighbouring bits, which don't actually exist in this example. (Edward Tufte probably has more to say about this.) –  Li-aung Yip May 23 '12 at 15:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is just common or garden sampling variation.

Imagine an experiment where you toss a coin ten times, repeatedly. You would not expect to get five heads every single time. That's down to sampling variation.

In just the same way, your experiment will be subject to sampling variation. Each bit follows the same statistical distribution. But sampling variation means that you would not expect an exact 50/50 split between 0 and 1.

Now, your plot is misleading you into thinking the variation is somehow significant or carries meaning. You'd get a much better understanding of this if you plotted the Y axis of the graph starting at 0. That graph looks like this:

enter image description here

If the RNG behaves as it should, then each bit will follow the binomial distribution with probability 0.5. This distribution has variance np(1 − p). For your experiment this gives a variance of 2.5 million. Take the square root to get the standard deviation of around 1,500. So you can see simply from inspecting your results, that the variation you see is not obviously out of the ordinary. You have 15 samples and none are more than 1.6 standard deviations from the true mean. That's nothing to worry about.

You have attempted to discern trends in the results. You have said that there are "3 most probable bits". That's only your particular interpretation of this sample. Try running your programs again with different seeds for your RNGs and you will have graphs that look a little different. They will still have the same quality to them. Some bits are set more than others. But there won't be any discernible patterns, and when you plot them on a graph that includes 0, you will see horizontal lines.

For example, here's what your C program outputs for a random seed of 98723498734.

enter image description here

I think this should be enough to persuade you to run some more trials. When you do so you will see that there are no special bits that are given favoured treatment.

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+1. But one would hope that as N goes to infinity, then the expected ratio would converge on 50%. –  Oli Charlesworth May 23 '12 at 15:30
    
@Oli Yes, but here we have N that is finite. And so there is always sampling variation. –  David Heffernan May 23 '12 at 15:31
    
Thanks for very good statistical explanation. However statistics doesn't explain the reasons of the concrete experiment outcome. And it is the reasons of outcome what is most interesting to me in this question. Can I say that exact seed to random() causes favoured bits to be set ? (That would explain Pseudorandomness "PSEUDO" part) –  Agnius Vasiliauskas May 23 '12 at 19:35
1  
Each concrete realisation is going to have some bits that are set more than others. But you can't predict which bits will come out on top and different bits win for different seeds. When considering random processes, you can't get very far trying to explain a single realisation. What you are asking in that comment is exactly analagous to asking why your coin toss came down heads rather than tails. –  David Heffernan May 23 '12 at 19:42
1  
@David: true, but I think the difference between PRNG and true RNG is actually quite an important part of the tricky concept of randomness, and shouldn't be neglected. The defining quality of a good PRNG is that it appears to generate random data, so the most important thing here is to establish whether the data the questioner shows appears random or not, i.e. whether its statistical properties are consistent with the likely statistical properties of a true RNG's output. Which, as far as this one test is concerned, it more-or-less is, I entirely agree with that main part of your answer. –  Steve Jessop May 23 '12 at 19:57

You know that the deviation is about 2500/5,000,000, which comes down to 0,05%?

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3  
And under the hypothesis that every bit really is uniformly random, the variance is n*p*q = n / 4, which means 2500 in 5 million is 2 and a bit standard deviations. –  Steve Jessop May 23 '12 at 15:29
    
I didn't mean deviation in the statistical manner (since I hardly ever touch the subject and barely know anything specific about it), but thanks for the addendum. –  CodeCaster May 23 '12 at 15:32
    
I ran this with 500000000 iterations, and came out with ~0.003% –  paul May 23 '12 at 15:33

Note that the difference of frequency of each bit varies by only about 0.08% (-0.03% to +0.05%). I don't think I would consider that significant. If every bit were exactly equally probable, I would find the PRNG very questionable instead of just somewhat questionable. You should expect some level of variance in processes that are supposed to be more or less modelling randomness...

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