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Most of the blogs or tutorials or books have private methods at the bottom of any class/module. Is this the best practice?

I find having private methods as and when necessary more convenient. For example:

public
def my_method
  # do something
  minion_method
end

private
def minion_method
  # do something
end

public
  def next_method
end

This way I find the code more readable instead of scrolling up and down continuously which is very irritating.

Is there something terribly wrong in this approach? Is having private methods at the bottom not just a best practice and something else?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 52 down vote accepted

The best practice in my point of view is to go sequentially and declare your methods without keeping private in point of view.

At the end, you can make make any method private by just adding: private :xmethod

Example:

class Example
 def xmethod
 end

 def ymethod
 end

 def zmethod 
 end

 private :xmethod, :zmethod

end

Does this justify your question?

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As others have already pointed out the convention is to put private methods at the bottom, under one private class. However, you should probably also know that many programers use a double indented (4 spaces instead of 2) method for this. The reason is that often times you won't see "private" in your text editor and assume they could be public. See below for an illustration:

class FooBar

  def some_public_method
  end

  def another_public_method
  end

private

    def some_private_method
    end

    def another_private method
    end

end

This method should prevent you from having to scroll up and down and will make other programmers more comfortable in your code.

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I think that public methods is a some kind of interface of the object, and it's logical to place them on the most prominent place i.e. in the top of file.

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4  
Yes, put the public methods where you're most likely to find them, generally near the top of the file, and things you probably shouldn't be looking at should be buried near the bottom. Like a newspaper article is written, put the most important things first. –  tadman May 23 '12 at 17:02

There's also the option to prepend private to the method definition.

class Example

 def xmethod
 end

 private def ymethod
 end

 private def zmethod 
 end

end

Looking at the definition, you instantly know if a method is private, no matter where in the file it's defined. It's a bit more typing (if you don't autocomplete) and not all your defs will be nicely aligned.

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1  
You should have added note, that this is available in Ruby 2.1 where methods return key with their own name: bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/3753 –  konole Aug 1 at 11:55

You don't need to put public or private above each method. I usually put all of my private methods at the bottom of my class. Also, don't have to explicitly say public as methods are public by default. For example:

class FooBar

  def some_public_method
  end

  def another_public_method
  end

private

  def some_private_method
  end

  def another_private method
  end

end
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Please read my question again. Have edited it to be more specific –  ZX12R May 23 '12 at 16:39
    
It's more of a convention than anything. What you're doing is valid and if it makes more sense to you then you should stick with it. I find the convention to be more readable but that's probably because that's how I was taught to write it so I'm just used to it. –  kyledecot May 23 '12 at 16:43
    
what does declaring a method as "public" actually mean/do ? –  ZX12R May 23 '12 at 16:47

I'm coming from java background and I hate to have to scroll to see method type. I think it's insane that one cannot specify method visibility per method without ugliness. So I ended up putting a comment #private before each suck method and then declaring private :....

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I don't like having to specify public or private for each method. Putting all private methods at the bottom lets me have a single instance of "private" per file. I guess it's a matter of taste.

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