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My understanding to par is that it will create a thread in another core to execution.

But I failed proof this understanding with following test code since the result showing seems only one thread is running.

Could you help me to figure out what's wrong here?

import Control.Monad
import Control.Parallel
import Control.Concurrent
import System.IO.Unsafe

fib :: Int -> Int 
fib 0 = 1 
fib 1 = 1 
fib n = (fib (n-1)) + (fib (n - 2))

test :: String -> [Int] -> IO () 
test _ [] = return () 
test name (a:xs) = do 
    tid <- myThreadId 
    print $ (show tid) ++ "==>" ++ (show a) ++ "==>" ++ (show $ fib a) ++ "==>" ++ name
    x `par` y 
  where x = test "2" xs
        y = test "3" (tail xs)

main = test "1" [10..35]

Compiled with:

ghc --make -threaded -rtsopts test-par.hs
time ./test-par +RTS -N2

The result

"ThreadId 3==>10==>89==>1"
"ThreadId 3==>12==>233==>3"
"ThreadId 3==>14==>610==>3"
"ThreadId 3==>16==>1597==>3"
"ThreadId 3==>18==>4181==>3"
"ThreadId 3==>20==>10946==>3"
"ThreadId 3==>22==>28657==>3"
"ThreadId 3==>24==>75025==>3"
"ThreadId 3==>26==>196418==>3"
"ThreadId 3==>28==>514229==>3"
"ThreadId 3==>30==>1346269==>3"
"ThreadId 3==>32==>3524578==>3"
"ThreadId 3==>34==>9227465==>3"

real    0m1.131s
user    0m0.668s
sys 0m0.492s

How many core I have?

cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep processor | wc -l
2

-------------------------------- update

I think this paper by Simon Marlow is a good reference for such newbie question.

share|improve this question
    
See also: stackoverflow.com/q/958449/83805 –  Don Stewart May 23 '12 at 17:49
    
Somewhat relevant - Simon Peyton-Jones has emphasized, in a video presentation (possibly YOW! 2011 related, possibly on Channel 9) emphasized that par is very lightweight and doesn't have the same setup costs as a thread or process. I'll post a link if I can figure out which video it was. At the time, my first thought was "implicit thread pool". –  Steve314 May 23 '12 at 17:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

No, par does not guarantee to create another thread.

It registers a spark in the runtime, which may cause the computation to be executed in a different thread, depending on the dynamic workload of the machine.

Creating a spark is very cheap, so you can create many (1000x) more than you have threads, and the runtime will just try to keep all your cores busy.

In your case, your x computation is registered as a spark, and then immediately discarded (you never refer to it again). So the garbage collector can remove it.

To parallelize a recursive function, you'll typically want to just use par up to some depth.

An example -- a recursive function with a cutoff depth:

import Control.Parallel
import Control.Monad
import Text.Printf

cutoff = 35

fib' :: Int -> Integer
fib' 0 = 0
fib' 1 = 1
fib' n = fib' (n-1) + fib' (n-2)

fib :: Int -> Integer
fib n | n < cutoff = fib' n
      | otherwise  = r `par` (l `pseq` l + r)
 where
    l = fib (n-1)
    r = fib (n-2)

main = forM_ [0..45] $ \i ->
            printf "n=%d => %d\n" i (fib i)

Run as:

$ ghc -O2 -threaded --make A.hs -rtsopts -fforce-recomp
$ ./A +RTS -N16 -s

Yields a parallel workload 1248.9% over sequential (i.e. 12.48x):

                                   Tot time (elapsed)  Avg pause  Max pause
  Gen  0      6264 colls,  6263 par    5.23s    0.41s     0.0001s    0.0109s
  Gen  1         1 colls,     1 par    0.00s    0.00s     0.0002s    0.0002s

  Parallel GC work balance: 7.09 (1797194 / 253525, ideal 16)

                        MUT time (elapsed)       GC time  (elapsed)
  Task  0 (worker) :    7.56s    (  9.36s)       0.92s    (  0.89s)
  Task  1 (worker) :    0.12s    ( 10.21s)       0.02s    (  0.05s)
  Task  2 (bound)  :    8.39s    (  9.51s)       0.70s    (  0.74s)
  Task  3 (worker) :    0.00s    (  0.00s)       0.00s    (  0.00s)
  Task  4 (worker) :    7.17s    (  9.60s)       0.53s    (  0.66s)
  Task  5 (worker) :    7.28s    (  9.55s)       0.56s    (  0.71s)
  Task  6 (worker) :    7.48s    (  9.52s)       0.56s    (  0.74s)
  Task  7 (worker) :    7.11s    (  9.54s)       0.66s    (  0.72s)
  Task  8 (worker) :    7.41s    (  9.62s)       0.70s    (  0.64s)
  Task  9 (worker) :    7.69s    (  9.48s)       0.66s    (  0.78s)
  Task 10 (worker) :    7.56s    (  9.51s)       0.56s    (  0.75s)
  Task 11 (worker) :    7.69s    (  9.42s)       0.86s    (  0.84s)
  Task 12 (worker) :    7.42s    (  9.40s)       0.92s    (  0.86s)
  Task 13 (worker) :    7.28s    (  9.39s)       0.91s    (  0.86s)
  Task 14 (worker) :    7.44s    (  9.38s)       0.91s    (  0.87s)
  Task 15 (worker) :    7.25s    (  9.33s)       1.11s    (  0.93s)
  Task 16 (worker) :    7.94s    (  9.33s)       0.97s    (  0.93s)
  Task 17 (worker) :    7.59s    (  9.37s)       1.06s    (  0.88s)

  SPARKS: 597 (446 converted, 0 dud, 1 GC'd, 150 fizzled)

  Productivity  96.1% of total user, 1245.3% of total elapsed

We created 597 sparks, of which 446 were converted into threads.

If you explicitly want to do manual thread creation and communication, this can be done via forkIO and MVars.

share|improve this answer
5  
It is also worth mentioning that par only works for pure computations, so doing par a b where a and b are monadic actions will in fact just discard the a action and perform the b action, which is what is happening in the askers example code. –  dflemstr May 23 '12 at 17:37
    
Well, it 'works' for monadic actions in that they are put in a queue, evaluated to their WHNF (e.g. IO ()) and returned. They're not executed though for their effect. Same as putting a function in a spark. –  Don Stewart May 23 '12 at 17:44
    
1. Since whether thread will be created or is "depending on the dynamic workload of the machine.", am I able to figure out it whether it is created or via any tools? Otherwise, is it not a very meaningful thing we should concern about? –  Simon May 24 '12 at 1:51
    
2. Seem IO action seems be discard even I change to par x (pseq y (x >> y >> print1)). Any samples show scenario that "it works for monadic when in a queue", or any references? –  Simon May 24 '12 at 1:56
    
The gc stats (above) show you when you're creating too many sparks. For more thorough debugging, use threadscope: haskell.org/haskellwiki/ThreadScope –  Don Stewart May 24 '12 at 11:39

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