Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For example:

 Files/ 
    main.py
    SubFileA/
        __init__.py              "from util1 import help"
        util1.py                 "def help(): print ...A..."
    SubFileB/
        __init__.py              "from util1 import help"
        util1.py                 "def help(): print ...B..."

and util1.py in SubFileA and SubFileB has different content.

I want to have some way users can specify which util1.py to be imported.

I am expecting something like:

  if subFileA:
       from SubFileA import *
  else:
       from SubFileB import *

util1.py has a same API, but the implementation is different.

Reason of why I am doing this, because if I combine two util1.py together, the code will get ugly and hard to maintain. Hoping anyone can give me a solution to this, or any advice will be great!

I try those code, but I got warning (it does work, but the warning is embarrassing):

main.py:4: SyntaxWarning: import * only allowed at module level
   def main():
main.py:4: SyntaxWarning: import * only allowed at module level
   def main():

everyone. I guess I found the solution. But it is not good programming style I think.

Files/
   main.py                              "from directory import *"
   directory/
       __init__.py                      
                                        "user=raw_input() 
                                        if user: 
                                              from directoryA import *
                                        else
                                              from directoryB import * "
       directoryA/
           __init__.py                   "from util1 import help1()"
           util1.py 
       directoryB/
           __init__.py                   "from util1 import help1()"
           util1.py 

Indeed, this looks very strange. But it does the job.

share|improve this question
    
is there only one file in both SubFileA and SubFileB? –  wong2 May 23 '12 at 18:02
2  
What you wrote looks good and is quite a common python idiom. You'll need __init__.py files in the directories but I expect you knew that. –  Nick Craig-Wood May 23 '12 at 18:02
1  
What is your question? The solution you describe should work fine. Are you getting a specific error? –  MikeWyatt May 23 '12 at 18:03
    
@wong2 no, there are multiple files in SubFileA and SubFileB. Where I plan to write all "from util*.py import *" in init.py, and in main.py I only have to write "from subFileA import *" –  lightmanhk May 23 '12 at 19:24

1 Answer 1

You need to make each of the directories into a package for the from <package> import ... syntax to work. To tell Python a directory is a package, simply create an empty __init__.py file in each directory.

If you want specific behavior depending on the version of util1 that is imported, you could write initialization code in each __init__.py file.

For more information, check the official documentation on packages.


Ultimately, your new project directory tree should look like this:

Files/ 
    main.py
    SubFileA/
        __init__.py
        util1.py
    SubFileB/
        __init__.py
        util1.py
share|improve this answer
    
Could you tell me more about "initialization code in each init.py" ? –  lightmanhk May 23 '12 at 19:44
    
__init__.py is run when you import a package, much like the __init__() method is run when you instantiate an object. Take a look at how popular Python projects write their __init__.py files to get an idea of different approaches. I recommend you read the official documentation on packages if you want to learn more. –  David Cain May 23 '12 at 20:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.