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I am looking at a javascript code that manipulates an HTML A tag , and I'm having trouble understanding how it sets up the "onclick" property. It seems to be telling it to update ytplayer_playitem with the index variable j and then call ytplayer_playlazy(1000)

But what's up with all the parentheses? What details in the javascript syntax allows it to be setup like this?

var a = document.createElement("a");
a.href = "#ytplayer";
a.onclick = (function (j) {
    return function () {
        ytplayer_playitem = j;
        ytplayer_playlazy(1000);
    };
})(i);
share|improve this question
    
That's called self execute function –  wong2 May 23 '12 at 18:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, basically, the value of onclick is a function. You are creating one using the function literal syntax.

You could do this:

a.onclick = function() { ytplayer_playitem = something; ytplayer_playlazy(1000); }

but that hard-codes the thing that gets played; every one of the links would play the same thing.

So, ok, you're in a loop (I assume) - just use the loop variable:

a.onclick = function() { ytplayer_playitem = i; ytplayer_playlazy(1000); }

That looks like it should work, but unfortunately the i inside the function is bound to the variable i, not its value at the time the function is created. By the time the user clicks on the link and calls the function, the loop will be long since over, andi will be set to whatever it was during the last time through the loop. So once again, all the links will play the same thing.

So instead you create a function that returns a function. Since the variable used in the returned function is declared inside the generating function (or as a parameter to it), every call to the generator creates a new instance of that variable.

The generator function definition looks like this:

function generate_onclick(j) {
    return function() { ytplayer_playitem = j; ytplayer_playlazy(1000); }
}

Then, inside the loop, you can call it thus:

a.onclick = generate_onclick(i);

Each generated function gets its very own j variable, which keeps its value forever instead of being changed by the loop. So each link plays the right thing. Mission accomplished.

Your original code is doing the same thing with one small difference: instead of defining a named function (generate_onclick) once and calling it each time through the loop, it's defining it as an anonymous function, from scratch, every time through the loop - and immediately calling it inline:

a.onclick = (... definition of generate_onclick goes here ...)(i)

the (i) at the end calls the function just defined, passing in the parameter i.

The extra parens are needed because of JavaScript's semicolon-insertion rules; function (y) {...}(blah) compiles as a standalone function definition followed by a standalone expression in parentheses, rather than a function call.

share|improve this answer
    
ok so the "a.onclick = (... definition of generate_onclick goes here ...)(i)" syntax is how you define anonymous functions in javascript, which is a new thing for me. –  umps May 23 '12 at 18:46
    
To be clear, function (parameters) { body; } is how you define an anonymous function. function foo(x) { blah;} and foo = function(x) { blah; } are equivalent. The (...)() stuff is how you call an anonymous function immediately after you define it. –  Mark Reed May 23 '12 at 18:49
a.onclick = (function (j) {
    return function () {
        ytplayer_playitem = j;
        ytplayer_playlazy(1000);
    };
})(i);

This creates a "closure" to ensure that the value of i that is bound to the handler is the value of i "at that time" and not i in the general.

In your code, the function inside the () is an expression, executed and passed the variable i. This is the (i) you see in the end part. In this executed function expression, the i becomes the local variable j. This executed function expression returns the handler function that is to be bound the onclick event carrying the value of j which was i "at that time"


if i did not use the closure:

//suppose i is 1
var i = 1;

a.onclick = function () {
    ytplayer_playitem = i;
    ytplayer_playlazy(1000);
};

//and changed i
i = 2;

//if you clicked the <a>, it would not be 1 onclick but 2 because you 
//did not assign the value of i "at that time". i is "tangible" this way
share|improve this answer

"But what's up with all the parentheses? "

Most of the parentheses are just doing what you'd expect.

There's an extra set that isn't technically needed, but is often used as a hint that the function is being invoked.

                       // v-v---these are part of the function definition like normal
    a.onclick = (function (j) {
           //   ^-----------this and...v
        return function () {
            ytplayer_playitem = j;
            ytplayer_playlazy(1000);
        };
 //  v---...this are technically not needed here, but are used as a hint
    })(i);
 //   ^-^---these invoked the function like normal

"What details in the javascript syntax allows it to be setup like this?"

The upshot is that the function is invoked immediately, and passed i so that its value is referenced by the j parameter in the immediately invoked function.

This creates a variable scope that the returned function will continue to have access to. This way it always has access to the j variable, and not the i that gets overwritten in the loop.


These inlined functions are abused a bit IMO. It becomes clearer if you simply make it a named function.

for(var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    // create the new element
    a.onclick = createHandler(i);
    // append it somewhere
}

function createHandler (j) {
    return function () {
        ytplayer_playitem = j;
        ytplayer_playlazy(1000);
    };
}

The resulting handler is exactly the same, but the code is much less cryptic.

share|improve this answer

Right, I'm going to guess that the surrounding code looks like this:

for (var i = 0; i < playitems.length; i++) {
    // above code here
}

Now, you could do the obvious thing here, and assign the onclick property like this:

a.onclick = function() {
    ytplayer_playitem = i;
    ytplayer_playlazy(1000);
};

However that wouldn't work very well, because the value of i changes. Whichever link was clicked, the last one would be the one activated, because the value of i at that point would be the last one in the list.

So you need to prevent this happening. You need to do this by creating a new scope, which is done by creating an extra function, which is immediately invoked:

(function (j) {
    // some code here
})(i);

Because i has been passed into the function, the value is passed rather than a reference to the variable being kept. This means that you can now define a function which will have a reference to the correct value. So you get your extra function to return the click handling function:

a.onclick = (function (j) { // j is the right number and always will be
   return function () { // this function is the click handler
       ytplayer_playitem = j;
       ytplayer_playlazy(1000);
   };
})(i);

So each a element has its own click handler function, each of which has its own individual j variable, which is the correct number. So the links, when clicked, will perform the function you want them to.

share|improve this answer
a.onclick = (function (j) {
  return function () {
      ytplayer_playitem = j;
      ytplayer_playlazy(1000);
  };
})(i);

What you have here is a self-invoking anonymous function. Let's break it down, first replacing the body of the function with something simpler (return j + 1;):

function( j ) { return j + 1; }

This s a run-of-the-mill anonymous function or closure. This line of code is an expression, and so it has a value, and that value is a function. Now we could do this:

var foo = function( j ) { return j + 1; }

foo( 5 );  // => 6

You recognize this, I'm sure—we're assigning the anonymous function to the variable foo, and then calling the function by name with the argument i. But, instead of creating a new variable, because the closure is an expression we can call it like this instead:

( function( j ) { return j + 1; } )( 5 );  // => 6

Same result. Now, it's just returning j + 1 but in your code it returns something else: Another anonymous function:

return function() { /* ... */ }

What happens when we have a self-invoking anonymous function that returns a function? The result is the "inner" function that was returned:

a.onclick = ( function( j ) {
    return function() {
             ytplayer_playitem = j;
             ytplayer_playlazy( 1000 );
           }
  }
)( i );

If i was equal to 9 then a.onclick would now hold a function equivalent to this:

function() {
  ytplayer_playitem = 9;
  ytplayer_playlazy( 1000 );
}

As others have pointed out, the usefulness of this is that when ( function( j ) { /* ... */ } )( i ) is invoked you are capturing the value of i at that time and putting it into j rather than creating a reference to the value i holds, which may (and probably will) change later on.

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