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I am trying to write a simple bash script for my local (Mac OS X) machine to move files from a directory on my machine to a remote machine. This line is failing:

rsync --verbose  --progress --stats --compress --rsh=ssh \
      --recursive --times --perms --links --delete \
      --exclude "*bak" --exclude "*~" \
      /repository/* $DEV_SERVER:$REMOTE_DIR

$DEV_SERVER and $REMOTE_DIR are defined previously, and I echo them to verify they're accurate.

The error I'm getting is:

rsync: link_stat /Users/myusername/mycurrentdirectory failed: No such file or directory (2)

To note here is that rather than using the defined directory (/repository, which is in the root of the machine), it uses my working directory. What is causing this?

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1  
Quote your variables, please! –  Dennis Williamson May 24 '12 at 3:16

2 Answers 2

Check that your \ characters have no whitespace after then at the end of the line, because this will cause BASH to not interpret the line wrap correctly, giving the rsync error above

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

This:

rsync --verbose  --progress --stats --compress --rsh=ssh \
  --recursive --times --perms --links --delete \
  --exclude "*bak" --exclude "*~" \
  /repository/* $DEV_SERVER:$REMOTE_DIR

should be this:

rsync --verbose  --progress --stats --compress --rsh=ssh --recursive --times --perms --links --delete --exclude "*bak" --exclude "*~" /repository/* $DEV_SERVER:$REMOTE_DIR

Bash interprets the \ character differently than the command line.

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How does bash handle it differently in non-interactive sessions? –  jordanm May 23 '12 at 20:13
    
Better suited for superuser.com –  sputnick May 23 '12 at 20:19
3  
The only problem I've had with using the line-continuation-char (i.e. `), on cmd-line OR in a script, is when there is any character besides a \n` character after it. I didn't downvote your answer, but I don't think it's right. Good luck to all. –  shellter May 23 '12 at 20:55
    
@sputnick That is really a question-based comment, not a response-based comment, though totally valid. –  Nathaniel Ford May 24 '12 at 17:28
3  
This is plain wrong. Bash interprets a script exactly the same way as it interprets input from the command prompt. –  holgero Feb 2 '13 at 15:17

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