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My question is: How do you get around the ORA-01704: string literal too long error when inserting (or doing anything in queries) with CLOBs?

I want to have a query like this:

INSERT ALL
   INTO mytable VALUES ('clob1')
   INTO mytable VALUES ('clob2') --some of these clobs are more than 4000 characters...
   INTO mytable VALUES ('clob3')
SELECT * FROM dual;

When I try it with actual values though I get ORA-01704: string literal too long back. This is pretty obvious, but how do I insert clobs (or execute any statement at all with a clob)?

I've tried looking at this question, but I don't think it has what I'm looking for. The clobs I have are in a List<String> and I iterate through them to make the statement. My code as it is follows:

private void insertQueries(String tempTableName) throws FileNotFoundException, DataException, SQLException, IOException {
String preQuery = "  into " + tempTableName + " values ('";
String postQuery = "')" + StringHelper.newline;
StringBuilder inserts = new StringBuilder("insert all" + StringHelper.newline);
List<String> readQueries = getDomoQueries();
for (String query : readQueries) {
  inserts.append(preQuery).append(query).append(postQuery);
}
inserts.append("select * from dual;");

DatabaseController.getInstance().executeQuery(databaseConnectionURL, inserts.toString());

}

public ResultSet executeQuery(String connection, String query) throws DataException, SQLException {
  Connection conn = ConnectionPool.getInstance().get(connection);
  Statement stmt = conn.createStatement();
  ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery(query);
  conn.commit();
  ConnectionPool.getInstance().release(conn);
  return rs;
}
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1  
Instead of dynamic SQL and building an insert statement with string literals, have you tried using a PreparedStatement and its setClob() method? –  QuantumMechanic May 23 '12 at 20:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are making it way to complicated.

Use a PreparedStatement and addBatch() for each clob in your list:

String sql = "insert  into " + tempTableName + " values (?)";
PreparedStatement stmt = connection.prepareStatement(sql);
for (String query : readQueries) {
  stmt.setCharacterStream(1, new StringReader(query), query.lenght());
  stmt.addBatch();
}
stmt.exececuteBatch();

No messing around with escaping strings, no problem with the length of the literals, no need to create temporary clobs. And most probably just as fast as using a single INSERT ALL statement.

If you are using a current driver (> 10.2) then I think the setCharacterStream() call and the creation of the Reader is not necessary either. A simple setString(1, query) will most probably work as well.

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From Oracle document

You must bear in mind the following automatic switching of the input mode for large data. There are three input modes as follows: Direct binding, Stream binding, and LOB binding.

For PL/SQL statements

The setBytes and setBinary stream methods use direct binding for data less than 32767 bytes.

The setBytes and setBinaryStream methods use LOB binding for data larger than 32766 bytes.

The setString, setCharacterStream, and setAsciiStream methods use direct binding for data smaller than 32767 bytes in the database character set.

The setString, setCharacterStream, and setAsciiStream methods use LOB binding for data larger than 32766 bytes in the database character set.

The setBytesForBlob and setStringForClob methods, present in the oracle.jdbc.OraclePreparedStatement interface, use LOB binding for any data size.

Follow is a example for put a file content into a input CLOB parameter of a PLSQL procedure:

  public int fileToClob( FileItem uploadFileItem ) throws SQLException, IOException
  {
    //for using stmt.setStringForClob method, turn the file to a big String 
    FileItem item = uploadFileItem;
    InputStream inputStream = item.getInputStream();
    InputStreamReader inputStreamReader = new InputStreamReader( inputStream ); 
    BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader( inputStreamReader );    
    StringBuffer stringBuffer = new StringBuffer();
    String line = null;

    while((line = bufferedReader.readLine()) != null) {  //Read till end
        stringBuffer.append(line);
        stringBuffer.append("\n");
    }

    String fileString = stringBuffer.toString();

    bufferedReader.close();         
    inputStreamReader.close();
    inputStream.close();
    item.delete();

    OracleCallableStatement stmt;

    String strFunction = "{ call p_file_to_clob( p_in_clob => ? )}";  

    stmt= (OracleCallableStatement)conn.prepareCall(strFunction);    

    try{    
      SasUtility servletUtility = sas.SasUtility.getInstance();

      stmt.setStringForClob(1, fileString );

      stmt.execute();

    } finally {      
      stmt.close();
    }
  }
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You'll need to use bind variables rather than building a SQL statement using string concatenation. This will be beneficial from a security, performance, and robustness standpoint as well since it will reduce the risk of SQL injection attacks, decrease the amount of time Oracle has to spend doing hard parses of the SQL statement, and will eliminate the potential that there is a special character in the string that causes an invalid SQL statement to get generated (i.e. a single quote).

I would expect that you want something like

private void insertQueries(String tempTableName) throws FileNotFoundException, DataException, SQLException, IOException {
  String preQuery = "  into " + tempTableName + " values (?)" + StringHelper.newline;
  StringBuilder inserts = new StringBuilder("insert all" + StringHelper.newline);
  List<String> readQueries = getDomoQueries();
  for (String query : readQueries) {
    inserts.append(preQuery);
  }
  inserts.append("select * from dual");

  Connection conn = ConnectionPool.getInstance().get(connection);
  PreparedStatement pstmt = conn.prepareStatement(
        inserts);
  int i = 1;
  for (String query : readQueries) {
    Clob clob = CLOB.createTemporary(conn, false, oracle.sql.CLOB.DURATION_SESSION);
    clob.setString(i, query);
    pstmt.setClob(i, clob);
    i = i + 1;
  }
  pstmt.executeUpdate();
}
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I think that should work, except the setClob method takes a clob not a string. In the other question it shows the creation of a clob is like this: oracle.sql.CLOB.createTemporary(connection, false, oracle.sql.CLOB.DURATION_SESSION); is that correct? –  kentcdodds May 23 '12 at 20:56
    
@kentcdodds - I believe so (I don't have my Java development environment with me at the moment to test) –  Justin Cave May 23 '12 at 20:59
    
You can also do setString() for an Oracle CLOB column. The Oracle JDBC driver is smart enough to perform the conversion. –  GriffeyDog May 23 '12 at 21:01
    
This is working great (I think). I'm getting an ORA-00911: invalid character which isn't exactly a surprise. I've looked around, is there any easy way to get the query out of the PreparedStatement so I can see what's wrong? –  kentcdodds May 23 '12 at 21:13
    
@JustinCave, I just edited your answer for the Clob, but I wasn't sure whether to do clob.setString(i, query); or clob.setString(1, query);... –  kentcdodds May 23 '12 at 21:22

BLOB (Binary Large Objects ) and CLOB(Character large objects) are special datatypes and can hold the large chunks of data in form of objects or text. Blob and Clob objects persist the data of the objects into the database as a stream.

An example piece of code:

public class TestDB { 
    public static void main(String[] args) { 
        try { 
            /** Loading the driver */ 
            Class.forName("com.oracle.jdbc.Driver"); 

            /** Getting Connection */ 
            Connection con = DriverManager.getConnection("Driver URL","test","test"); 

            PreparedStatement pstmt = con.prepareStatement("insert into Emp(id,name,description)values(?,?,?)"); 
            pstmt.setInt(1,5); 
            pstmt.setString(2,"Das"); 

            // Create a big CLOB value...AND inserting as a CLOB 
            StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer(400000); 

            sb.append("This is the Example of CLOB .."); 
            String clobValue = sb.toString(); 

            pstmt.setString(3, clobValue); 
            int i = pstmt.executeUpdate(); 
            System.out.println("Done Inserted"); 
            pstmt.close(); 
            con.close(); 

            // Retrive CLOB values 
            Connection con = DriverManager.getConnection("Driver URL","test","test"); 
            PreparedStatement pstmt = con.prepareStatement("select * from Emp where id=5"); 
            ResultSet rs = pstmt.executeQuery(); 
            Reader instream = null; 

            int chunkSize; 
            if (rs.next()) { 
                String name = rs.getString("name"); 
                java.sql.Clob clob = result.getClob("description") 
                StringBuffer sb1 = new StringBuffer(); 

                chunkSize = ((oracle.sql.CLOB)clob).getChunkSize(); 
                instream = clob.getCharacterStream(); 
                BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(instream); 
                String line = null; 
                while ((line = in.readLine()) != null) { 
                    sb1.append(line); 
                } 

                if (in != null) { 
                    in.close(); 
                } 

                // this is the clob data converted into string
                String clobdata = sb1.toString();  
            } 
        } catch (Exception e) { 
            e.printStackTrace(); 
        } 
    } 
} 
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1  
Thanks for providing a response. Next time, please format your code with a logical indent scheme. I'll edit your post this time for you. (Hint: You'll get more up-votes if your code is pretty in addition to functional.) –  bohney Oct 6 '12 at 17:23

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