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I have optimized as much as I could my function for sequential running. When I use openMP I see no gain in performance. I tried my program on a machine with 1 cores and on a machine with 8 cores, and the performance is the same.
With year set to 20, I have
1 core: 1 sec.
8 core: 1 sec.

With year set to 25 I have
1 core: 40 sec.
8 core: 40 sec.

1 core machine: my laptop's intel core 2 duo 1.8 GHz, ubuntu linux
8 core machine: 3.25 GHz, ubuntu linux

My program enumerate all the possible path of a binomial tree and do some work on each path. So my loop size increase exponentially and I would expect the footprint of openMP thread to be zero. In my loop, I only do a reduction of one variable. All other variable are read-only. I only use function I wrote, and I think they are thread safe.

I also run Valgrind cachegrind on my program. I don't fully understand the output but there seems to be no cache miss or false sharing.

I compile with

gcc -O3 -g3 -Wall -c -fmessage-length=0 -lm -fopenmp -ffast-math

My complete program is as below. Sorry for posting a lot of code. I'm not familiar with openMP nor C, and I couldn't resume my code more without loosing the main task.

How can I improve performance when I use openMP?
Are they some compiler flags or C tricks that will make the program run faster?

test.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <omp.h>
#include "test.h"

int main(){

    printf("starting\n");
    int year=20;
    int tradingdate0=1;

    globalinit(year,tradingdate0);

    int i;
    float v=0;
    long n=pow(tradingdate0+1,year);
    #pragma omp parallel for reduction(+:v)
    for(i=0;i<n;i++)
        v+=pathvalue(i);

    globaldel();
    printf("finished\n");
    return 0;
}

//***function on which openMP is applied
float pathvalue(long pathindex) {
    float value = -ctx.firstpremium;
    float personalaccount = ctx.personalaccountat0;
    float account = ctx.firstpremium;
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < ctx.year-1; i++) {
        value *= ctx.accumulationfactor;
        double index = getindex(i,pathindex);
        account = account * index;
        double death = fmaxf(account,ctx.guarantee[i]);
        value += qx(i) * death;
        if (haswithdraw(i)){
            double withdraw = personalaccount*ctx.allowed;
            value += px(i) * withdraw;
            personalaccount = fmaxf(personalaccount-withdraw,0);
            account = fmaxf(account-withdraw,0);
        }
    }

    //last year
    double index = getindex(ctx.year-1,pathindex);
    account = account * index;
    value+=fmaxf(account,ctx.guarantee[ctx.year-1]);

    return value * ctx.discountfactor;
}



int haswithdraw(int period){
    return 1;
}

float getindex(int period, long pathindex){
    int ndx = (pathindex/ctx.chunksize[period])%ctx.tradingdate;
    return ctx.stock[ndx];
}

float qx(int period){
    return 0;
}

float px(int period){
    return 1;
}

//****global
struct context ctx;

void globalinit(int year, int tradingdate0){
    ctx.year = year;
    ctx.tradingdate0 = tradingdate0;
    ctx.firstpremium = 1;
    ctx.riskfreerate = 0.06;
    ctx.volatility=0.25;
    ctx.personalaccountat0 = 1;
    ctx.allowed = 0.07;
    ctx.guaranteerate = 0.03;
    ctx.alpha=1;
    ctx.beta = 1;
    ctx.tradingdate=tradingdate0+1;
    ctx.discountfactor = exp(-ctx.riskfreerate * ctx.year);
    ctx.accumulationfactor = exp(ctx.riskfreerate);
    ctx.guaranteefactor = 1+ctx.guaranteerate;
    ctx.upmove=exp(ctx.volatility/sqrt(ctx.tradingdate0));
    ctx.downmove=1/ctx.upmove;

    ctx.stock=(float*)malloc(sizeof(float)*ctx.tradingdate);
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<ctx.tradingdate;i++)
        ctx.stock[i]=pow(ctx.upmove,ctx.tradingdate0-i)*pow(ctx.downmove,i);

    ctx.chunksize=(long*)malloc(sizeof(long)*ctx.year);
    for(i=0;i<year;i++)
        ctx.chunksize[i]=pow(ctx.tradingdate,ctx.year-i-1);

    ctx.guarantee=(float*)malloc(sizeof(float)*ctx.year);
    for(i=0;i<ctx.year;i++)
        ctx.guarantee[i]=ctx.beta*pow(ctx.guaranteefactor,i+1);
}

void globaldel(){
    free(ctx.stock);
    free(ctx.chunksize);
    free(ctx.guarantee);
}

test.h

float pathvalue(long pathindex);
int haswithdraw(int period);
float getindex(int period, long pathindex);
float qx(int period);
float px(int period);
//***global
struct context{
    int year;
    int tradingdate0;
    float firstpremium;
    float riskfreerate;
    float volatility;
    float personalaccountat0;
    float allowed;
    float guaranteerate;
    float alpha;
    float beta;
    int tradingdate;
    float discountfactor;
    float accumulationfactor;
    float guaranteefactor;
    float upmove;
    float downmove;
    float* stock;
    long* chunksize;
    float* guarantee;
};
struct context ctx;
void globalinit();
void globaldel();

EDIT I simplify all global variables as constant. For 20 year, the program run two time faster (great!). I tried to set the number of thread with OMP_NUM_THREADS=4 ./test for example. But it didn't give me any performance gain.
Can my gcc have some problem?

test.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <omp.h>
#include "test.h"


int main(){

    starttimer();
    printf("starting\n");
    int i;
    float v=0;

    #pragma omp parallel for reduction(+:v)
    for(i=0;i<numberofpath;i++)
        v+=pathvalue(i);

    printf("v:%f\nfinished\n",v);
    endtimer();
    return 0;
}

//function on which openMP is applied
float pathvalue(long pathindex) {
    float value = -firstpremium;
    float personalaccount = personalaccountat0;
    float account = firstpremium;
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < year-1; i++) {
        value *= accumulationfactor;
        double index = getindex(i,pathindex);
        account = account * index;
        double death = fmaxf(account,guarantee[i]);
        value += death;
        double withdraw = personalaccount*allowed;
        value += withdraw;
        personalaccount = fmaxf(personalaccount-withdraw,0);
        account = fmaxf(account-withdraw,0);
    }

    //last year
    double index = getindex(year-1,pathindex);
    account = account * index;
    value+=fmaxf(account,guarantee[year-1]);

    return value * discountfactor;
}



float getindex(int period, long pathindex){
    int ndx = (pathindex/chunksize[period])%tradingdate;
    return stock[ndx];
}

//timing
clock_t begin;

void starttimer(){
    begin = clock();
}

void endtimer(){
    clock_t end = clock();
    double elapsed = (double)(end - begin) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    printf("\nelapsed: %f\n",elapsed);
}

test.h

float pathvalue(long pathindex);
int haswithdraw(int period);
float getindex(int period, long pathindex);
float qx(int period);
float px(int period);
//timing
void starttimer();
void endtimer();
//***constant
const int year= 20 ;
const int tradingdate0= 1 ;
const float firstpremium= 1 ;
const float riskfreerate= 0.06 ;
const float volatility= 0.25 ;
const float personalaccountat0= 1 ;
const float allowed= 0.07 ;
const float guaranteerate= 0.03 ;
const float alpha= 1 ;
const float beta= 1 ;
const int tradingdate= 2 ;
const int numberofpath= 1048576 ;
const float discountfactor= 0.301194211912 ;
const float accumulationfactor= 1.06183654655 ;
const float guaranteefactor= 1.03 ;
const float upmove= 1.28402541669 ;
const float downmove= 0.778800783071 ;
const float stock[2]={1.2840254166877414, 0.7788007830714049};
const long chunksize[20]={524288, 262144, 131072, 65536, 32768, 16384, 8192, 4096, 2048, 1024, 512, 256, 128, 64, 32, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1};
const float guarantee[20]={1.03, 1.0609, 1.092727, 1.1255088100000001, 1.1592740743, 1.1940522965290001, 1.2298738654248702, 1.2667700813876164, 1.304773183829245, 1.3439163793441222, 1.384233870724446, 1.4257608868461793, 1.4685337134515648, 1.512589724855112, 1.557967416600765, 1.6047064390987882, 1.6528476322717518, 1.7024330612399046, 1.7535060530771016, 1.8061112346694148};
share|improve this question
1  
There is already performance to gain for the sequential code, you should always start by this. Your global structure with the parameters basically kills all possibilities for the compiler to optimize. The rule is simple have all constants as constants (enum for integers or #define for floating point) and pass all run time parameters as argument to your function. The way you are doing it the compiler cannot be sure that some other part of the program doesn't change particular values of the struct, so it can't do constant propagation. Cleaning that up will also help the parallel compilation. –  Jens Gustedt May 23 '12 at 21:27
    
@JensGustedt Thanks for telling the right way to manage global variables. It made my code 2 times faster (see my edit in my question). I still see no gain from parallelization though. –  Nicolas Essis-Breton May 24 '12 at 1:34
1  
Nicolas, you didn't follow it directly though. With your approach you will have difficulties with multiple defined symbols as soon as you will have a program with several .o files. If it is your gcc that has problems, we can't tell, you didn't even tell us which version you use. To see if OpenMP makes a difference compile your program to assembly (with -O3 -S) and compare the resulting code with and without -fopenmp. –  Jens Gustedt May 24 '12 at 5:33
    
@JensGustedt I think the multiple definition problem can be solved by using extern declaration. Otherwise, can you sketch the right approach? My gcc was ok finally, I was not measuring openMP performance correctly as pointed by Hristo Iliev. –  Nicolas Essis-Breton May 24 '12 at 13:28
    
A declaration (and that it is if you have extern) can't have an initialization. So some of your code wouldn't see the value and the optimization potential would be much less. –  Jens Gustedt May 24 '12 at 22:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Even if your program benefits from using OpenMP, you won't see it because you are measuring the wrong time.

clock() returns the total CPU time spent in all threads. If you run with four threads and each runs for 1/4 of the time, clock() will still return the same value since 4*(1/4) = 1. You should be measuring the wall-clock time instead.

Replace calls to clock() with omp_get_wtime() or gettimeofday(). They both provide high precision wall-clock timing.

P.S. Why are there so many people around SO using clock() for timing?

share|improve this answer
    
Very good insight. That was exactly my problem. When measuring the time correctly, I see a 7 times speed up between my 1 core and 8 cores machines. Thank you. In my case, using clock() was due to newbieness. –  Nicolas Essis-Breton May 24 '12 at 13:16

It seems as if it should work. Probably you need to specify the number of threads to use. You can do so by setting the OMP_NUM_THREADS variable. For instance, for using 4 threads:

OMP_NUM_THREADS=4 ./test

EDIT: I just compiled the code and I observe significant speedups when changing the number of threads.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried your approach but the performance is the same between my 1 core and my 8 cores machine. Can you post your gcc command? –  Nicolas Essis-Breton May 24 '12 at 1:46
1  
@NicolasEssis-Breton I used exactly the same command line you posted. The only difference is that I increased year to 22 (with year=20 the program was finishing so quick that it was not possible to measure any speedup). For year=22 there was a 2X speedup when going from 1 to 4 threads (my machine has 4 cores). It is not a linear speedup, but it is definitely significant. –  betabandido May 24 '12 at 10:26

I don't see any section in which you're specifying the number of cores OpenMP will use. It's supposed to, by default, use the number of CPUs it sees, but for my purposes, I've always forced it to use as many as I specified.

Add this line before your parallel for construct:

#pragma omp parallel num_threads(num_threads)
{
   // Your parallel for follows here
}

...where num_threads is an integer between 1 and the number of cores on your machine.

EDIT: Here's the makefile used to build the code. Place this in a text file named Makefile in the same directory.

test: test.c test.h
    cc -o $@ $< -O3 -g3 -fmessage-length=0 -lm -fopenmp -ffast-math
share|improve this answer
    
Makoto, IMO this can't be the reason Nicolas is not seeing speedup (unless his machine is single core). –  Aater Suleman May 23 '12 at 21:17
    
@AaterSuleman: You do need to specify the number of threads when dealing with OpenMP someplace - be it the global variable or through this, though. –  Makoto May 23 '12 at 21:23
    
Like you point out, it sets it to the number of available cores unless otherwise specified. Thus, on his 8 core system, there will be 8 (or 16 if HT) threads even if he doesn't specify any threads. –  Aater Suleman May 23 '12 at 21:25
    
@Makoto I tried your approach, but I still have no performance gain on my 8 cores machine. –  Nicolas Essis-Breton May 24 '12 at 1:49
    
@NicolasEssis-Breton: Which computer? The single-core will have higher overhead due to switching out the threads. Also, I do want to note that the code (without the -c flag) actually ran really quickly on my quad-core machine as-is. –  Makoto May 24 '12 at 1:53

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