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Basically I need to be able to do this:

var obj = {"foo":"bar"},
    arr = [];
with( obj ){
   arr.push( foo );
   arr.push( notDefinedOnObj ); // fails with 'ReferenceError: notDefinedOnObj is not defined'
}
console.log(arr); // ["bar", ""] <- this is what it should be.

I'm looking for a "global" equivalent of {}.__defineGetter__ or {get} in order to return an empty string for all undefined property getters (note that this is different than a property that is undefined).

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Can you use a proxy? –  thisgeek May 23 '12 at 21:17
    
It doesn't look like Proxy is available in any node version. :-( –  David Murdoch May 23 '12 at 21:50
    
Yeah. Looks like V8 is still working on it. –  thisgeek May 23 '12 at 22:12
    
Proxy is available on 0.7.8 with the --harmony command line flag. –  David Murdoch May 23 '12 at 23:09
1  
And (a buggy) Proxy is available in node 0.6.18 via the --harmony_proxies flag. –  David Murdoch May 23 '12 at 23:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can create a Proxy to return an empty string whenever undefined properties are accessed.

app.js:

var obj = {"foo":"bar"},
    arr = [],
    p = Proxy.create({
        get: function(proxy, name) {
            return obj[name] === undefined ? '' : obj[name];
        }
    });
arr.push( p.foo );
arr.push( p.notDefinedOnObj );

console.log(arr);

As question author David Murdoch notes, if you are using node v0.6.18 (the latest stable release at the time this post was written), you must pass the --harmony_proxies option when you run the script:

$ node --harmony_proxies app.js
[ 'bar', '' ]

Note that this solution will not work if you use with, as in:

var obj = {"foo":"bar"},
    arr = [],
    p = Proxy.create({
        get: function(proxy, name) {
            return obj[name] === undefined ? '' : obj[name];
        }
    });
with ( p ) {
   arr.push( foo ); // ReferenceError: foo is not defined
   arr.push( notDefinedOnObj );
}

console.log(arr);

with does not seem to call the proxy's get method when adding the proxy to the scope chain.

Note: the proxy handler passed to Proxy.create() in this is example is incomplete. See Proxy: Common mistakes and misunderstanding for more details.

share|improve this answer
1  
The different proxy implementations are all over the place. Proxy in 0.6.x just doesn't work if you actually want to pass the proxy around. In 0.7.8 Object.getPropertyDescriptor doesn't exist, even though the getPropertyDescriptor method is required on the Proxy and gets called when you look up a non-existent property (you can fake it by using Object.get**Own**PropertyDescriptor instead). –  David Murdoch May 24 '12 at 20:02
1  
I discovered that node-proxy (doesn't compile on Windows right now, grab node-proxy.bin from here) DOES work on v 0.6.x WITHOUT any special command-line flags. However, you must return true from the hasOwn method on the proxy, not getPropertyDescriptor. Unfortunately, this means if( (name in obj) ) checks will ALWAYS return true. –  David Murdoch May 24 '12 at 20:06

There is no global missing member handler in javascript. You'll need to introduce a function to abstract out the behavior

function getOrEmpty(obj, name) {
  if (!obj.hasOwnProperty(name)) {
    return "";
  }
  return obj[name];
}

var obj = {"foo":"bar"},
    arr = [];
arr.push(getOrEmpty(obj, "foo"));
arr.push(getOrEmpty(obj, "someUndefinedProperty"));
console.log(arr);
share|improve this answer
    
Right, but the code being run is user generated (from a template). Also, the getOrEmpty function would need to call Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(obj, name) instead of checking the value of the property itself against undefined. An undefined value may be intended. –  David Murdoch May 23 '12 at 21:19
    
p.s., I suggested using the prototype's hasOwnProperty instead of obj's because if obj somehow gets a hasOwnProperty property the call will fail. I know in the example given this can't happen, but it is a good thing to watch out for. –  David Murdoch May 23 '12 at 21:48
    
@DavidMurdoch I figured that's why you suggested it. But if javascript code starts replacing predefined members you're essentially screwed anyways. No telling what they blew up. –  JaredPar May 23 '12 at 23:06

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