Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a log file that contains, among other data, lines like these:

2012-05-23T20:52:11+00:00 heroku[router]: GET myapp.com/practitioner_activities/10471/edit dyno=web.2 queue=0 wait=0ms service=866ms status=200 bytes=48799
2012-05-23T20:52:46+00:00 heroku[router]: GET myapp.com/users/sign_out dyno=web.1 queue=0 wait=0ms service=20ms status=302 bytes=88
2012-05-23T20:52:46+00:00 heroku[router]: GET myapp.com/ dyno=web.13 queue=0 wait=0ms service=18ms status=200 bytes=4680
2012-05-23T20:53:04+00:00 heroku[router]: POST myapp.com/p/ENaCXExu7qNEqzwYYyPs dyno=web.5 queue=0 wait=0ms service=207ms status=302 bytes=119
2012-05-23T20:53:04+00:00 heroku[router]: GET myapp.com/practitioner_activities/welcome dyno=web.3 queue=0 wait=0ms service=57ms status=200 bytes=5061
2012-05-23T20:53:04+00:00 heroku[router]: GET myapp.com/assets/application-print-715276cc0b76d0d82db3ab5866f22a23.css dyno=web.14 queue=0 wait=0ms service=9ms status=200 bytes=76386

I'd like to parse them and dump them into a file I can open with excel for analysis. I need the Hour, Minute, Verb (GET or POST), url and the 'service=' time.

For example, for the first line above:

2012-05-23T20:52:11+00:00 heroku[router]: GET myapp.com/practitioner_activities/10471/edit dyno=web.2 queue=0 wait=0ms service=866ms status=200 bytes=48799

I'd expect the output to look something like:

"20", "52", "GET", "myapp.com/practitioner_activities/10471/edit", "866"

How would I do this in awk or with a short ruby script?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using awk, you could try something like:

awk '{ OFS="\", \""; split ($8, array, "="); printf "\"" substr ($1 , length ($1) - 13, 2 ) OFS substr ($1 , length ($1) - 10, 2 ) OFS $3 OFS $4 OFS substr (array[2], 0, length (array[2]) -2) "\"\n" }' file.txt

Results:

"20", "52", "GET", "myapp.com/practitioner_activities/10471/edit", "866"
"20", "52", "GET", "myapp.com/users/sign_out", "20"
"20", "52", "GET", "myapp.com/", "18"
"20", "53", "POST", "myapp.com/p/ENaCXExu7qNEqzwYYyPs", "207"
"20", "53", "GET", "myapp.com/practitioner_activities/welcome", "57"
"20", "53", "GET", "myapp.com/assets/application-print-715276cc0b76d0d82db3ab5866f22a23.css", "9"

HTH

Edit:

awk '{ OFS="\", \""; ORS="\"\n"; split ($8, array, "="); print "\"" substr ($1 , 12, 2 ), substr ($1 , 15, 2 ), $3, $4, array[2] + 0 }' file.txt

Thanks Dennis! The code is much much nice now :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Helps a lot, thanks. –  Kevin Bedell May 23 '12 at 22:21
    
Glad I could help :-) –  Steve May 23 '12 at 22:26
    
You could use ORS = "\"\n" and print with commas (instead of explicitly saying OFS repeatedly, however you'd still set OFS as you have) instead of printf (since you're not using a format string). Or you could printf "\"%d" OFS "%d" OFS "%s" OFS "%s" OFS "%d\"\n", substr($1, length($1) - 13, 2), substr($1, length($1) - 10, 2), $3, $4, substr(array[2], 0, length(array[2]) - 2) which separates presentation and data. Also, in this last case, you could use a shorter variable name than OFS. Using length isn't really necessary. The timestamp is fixed length (you're relying on ... –  Dennis Williamson May 24 '12 at 1:01
    
... that already. Just use an offset from the left instead of the right. The hour would be substr($1, 12, 2). –  Dennis Williamson May 24 '12 at 1:05
    
@DennisWilliamson Points noted. Thanks! –  Steve May 24 '12 at 1:24

A ruby answer

ruby -ane '
    hr, min = $F[0][/(?<=T)\d\d:\d\d/].split(/:/)
    svc = $F[7].split(/=/)[-1]; svc[/ms/] = ""
    puts %q{"%d", "%d", "%s", "%s", "%d"} % [hr, min, $F[2], $F[3], svc]
' logfile
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.