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This is a high-level, general question. There are some similar ones around with different, and more concise, examples. Perhaps it cannot be answered. conn is a matrix.

     for (i in 2:dim(conn)[1]) {
        for (j in 2:dim(conn)[1]) {
          if ((conn[i, 1] == conn[1, j]) & conn[i, 1] != 0) {
              conn[i, j] <- 1
              conn[j, i] <- 1
              }
              else {
                conn[i, j] <- 0
                conn[j, i] <- 0
                }
           }
      }

This comes straight out of cluscomp from the clusterCons package.

My question is simply: is it possible to speed up the loop or to vectorise it? As an R beginner, I cannot see it and don't want to end up with frustration because it may not be possible. I'll accept any answer that can say yes or no and hint towards the potential amount of effort involved.

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1  
Please post sample data and expected results. Also, try to describe in words what the code is supposed to do. –  Andrie May 23 '12 at 21:35
    
Yes, it is very likely that a very fast solution can be found in this case. I'll see if I can cook something up quickly. –  nograpes May 23 '12 at 22:10
    
Will the matrix conn always be symmetric? –  Jason Morgan May 24 '12 at 0:49
1  
Do you mean "cluscomp"? There's no conscomp in clusterCons. –  mdsumner May 24 '12 at 3:51
    
Looking at the cluscomp code, it seems like (a) this is referring to cluscomp, yeah, and (b) the data is always symmetric. Hmm, I have an idea.... –  Fhnuzoag May 24 '12 at 9:11
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Non-matrixy solution - should be pretty damn fast, assuming conn is non-negative and symmetric...

connmake = function(conn){
  ordering = order(conn[,1])
  breakpoints = which(diff(conn[ordering,1]) != 0)
  if (conn[ordering[1], 1] != 0){
    breakpoints = c(1, breakpoints + 1, nrow(conn) + 1)
  } else {
    breakpoints = c(breakpoints + 1, nrow(conn) +1)
  }
  output = matrix(0, nrow(conn), nrow(conn))

  for (i in 1:(length(breakpoints) - 1)){
    output[ ordering[breakpoints[i]:(breakpoints[i+1] -1)],
        ordering[breakpoints[i]:(breakpoints[i+1] -1)]] =  1
  }
  output[,1] = conn[,1]
  output[1,] = conn[,1]
  output
}

Some test code using earlier benchmarking. (Original code is implemented as orig() , f2() is earlier suggestion.)

size = 2000
conn  = matrix(0, size, size)
conn[1,] = sample( 1:20, size, replace = T)
conn[,1] = conn[1,]

system.time(orig(conn) -> out1)
#user  system elapsed 
#20.54    0.00   20.54 
system.time(f2(conn) -> out2)
#user  system elapsed
#0.39    0.02    0.41 
system.time(connmake(conn) -> out3)
#user  system elapsed 
#0.02    0.00    0.01 
identical(out1, out2)
#[1] TRUE
identical(out1, out3)
#[1] TRUE

Note that f2 actually fails for conn containing 0, but not my problem, eh? conn with negative values can be dealt with simply by e.g. increasing the relevant values by a safe offset. Non-symmetric conn will require more thought, but should be doable...

The general lesson is that sort is fast compared to pairwise comparison. Pairwise comparison is O(N^2), while the slowest sort algorithm in R is O(N^4/3). Once the data is sorted, comparisons become trivial.

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Also, there's probably a way to get rid of that loop in there if it's still not fast enough, but I doubt it's worth it. –  Fhnuzoag May 24 '12 at 10:19
    
+1 for the nice algo. Thanks for pointing out I forgot the 0 case, I have fixed my code. –  flodel May 24 '12 at 16:42
    
I bow to your R expertise. In fact f2 looks very promising, very fast, but wasn't working as expected, hence, no "answer" yet. Will have a go with connmake tomorrow morning. Thanks again! –  Rico May 24 '12 at 16:53
    
I'm not sure what objects go in and out, but I had to add rownames(output) <- row.names(x)and colnames(output) <- row.names(x)to make it work. –  Rico May 28 '12 at 11:50
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Here is how I would have written it, using outer as a substitute for the double loop. Note that it is still doing more computations than needed, but is certainly faster. I have assumed conn is a square matrix.

The original code:

f1 <- function(conn) {
   for (i in 2:dim(conn)[1]) {
      for (j in 2:dim(conn)[1]) {
         if ((conn[i, 1] == conn[1, j]) & conn[i, 1] != 0) {
            conn[i, j] <- 1
            conn[j, i] <- 1
         } else {
            conn[i, j] <- 0
            conn[j, i] <- 0
         }
      }
   }
   return(conn)
}

My suggestion:

f2 <- function(conn) {
   matches <- 1*outer(conn[-1,1], conn[1,-1], `==`)
   matches[conn[-1,1] == 0, ] <- 0
   ind <- upper.tri(matches)
   matches[ind] <- t(matches)[ind]
   conn[-1,-1] <- matches
   return(conn)
}

Some sample data:

set.seed(12345678)
conn <- matrix(sample(1:2, 5*5, replace=TRUE), 5, 5)
conn
#      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
# [1,]    2    2    1    2    1
# [2,]    1    1    2    2    1
# [3,]    2    2    1    2    1
# [4,]    2    2    2    2    1
# [5,]    1    1    2    2    1

The results:

f1(conn)
#      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
# [1,]    2    2    1    2    1
# [2,]    1    0    1    1    0
# [3,]    2    1    0    0    1
# [4,]    2    1    0    1    0
# [5,]    1    0    1    0    1

identical(f1(conn), f2(conn))
# [1] TRUE

A bigger example, with time comparison:

set.seed(12345678)
conn <- matrix(sample(1:2, 1000*1000, replace=TRUE), 1000, 1000)

system.time(a1 <- f1(conn))
# user  system elapsed 
# 59.840   0.000  57.094 

system.time(a2 <- f2(conn))
# user  system elapsed 
# 0.844   0.000   0.950 

identical(a1, a2)
# [1] TRUE

Maybe not the fastest method you can get (I have no doubt other people here can find much faster using e.g. compiler or Rcpp), but short and fast enough for you I hope.


Edit: since it has been pointed out (from the context of where this code was pulled from) that conn is a symmetric matrix, my solution can be shortened a bit:

f2 <- function(conn) {
   matches <- outer(conn[-1,1], conn[1,-1],
                    function(i,j)ifelse(i==0, FALSE, i==j)) 
   conn[-1,-1] <- as.numeric(matches)
   return(conn)
}
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The last (oh so elegant) version crashes my machine, but the other one works fine. –  Rico May 28 '12 at 11:48
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Several things come to mind.

First, you can cut the time about in half by only looping through the entries below the diagonal or above the diagonal. If the matrix is square either will work. If dim(conn)[1] > dim(conn)[2] then you'll want to loop through the bottom-left triangle using something like

for (j in 2:dim(conn)[2]) {
  for (i in j:dim(conn)[1]) {
    ...
  }
}

Second, one might try to use apply and it's ilk because they usually generate significant time decreases. However, in this case each [i,j] cell refers back to both the column head [1,j] and the row head [i,1], which means we can't just send a cell, row or column to *pply. For code clarity, I would probably keep the for loops. Any *pply-based trick that worked would be so clever that I'd forget how it worked a year from now.

Finally, this seems like a classic example of something that would be much, much faster using C called from R. This might seem like a lot of work, but it's a lot easier than you might think, even (for this particular example) if you don't know C. The first brief example of calling C from R that made sense to me was here, but it doesn't leverage Rcpp, so I wouldn't stop there. Alternatively, if you start with any simple example of working Rcpp code then you could modify it to do what you want here. If you just want to modify someone else's code, start with this StackOverflow thread.

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