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I'm trying to call a function in a C++ library with a C compatible header, which wants me to pass in a 4x4 matrix for it to populate.

My Go function definition looks like this:

func GetMatrix(matrix [][]float32)

func GetMatrix(matrix []float32)

And the c header defines it like this:

void getMatrix(const float **matrix)

I've tried using C.GoBytes to get a byte array, but then from there I'm a little lost as I have to go from a byte array to an array of pointers, which I then again convert to an array of bytes, and eventually an array of floats.

At least I think that's what I need to do.

I've seen examples of code replacing the underlying Go slice with the C array data, but I believe in those cases, the Go GC won't collect them. Ideally matrix [][]float32 would behave like a normal Go slice.

Edit: The documentation was incorrect, and the underlying C type is actually a 16 element float array.

So the question then becomes, can I use C.GoBytes with a pointer, to a pointer of an array, and if so, how do I get a []float32 from []byte?

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5 Answers 5

Edited This prints the right stuff

package main

/*
#include <stdio.h>
void getMatrix(const float **matrix){
    float *m = (float *)matrix;
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i<9; i++) {
        printf("%f\n",m[i]);
    }
}
*/
import "C"
import "unsafe"

func main() {
    a := []float32{1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9}
    C.getMatrix((**C.float)(unsafe.Pointer(&a[0])))
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I tried that originally, and even though it compiles, it doesn't actually get the right data. It's a pointer to a pointer, and all this does is convert a pointer to a pointer to a pointer. The problem is you still need to that extra redirect on the C side before you can pass in the pointer to the Go slice. I ended up writing a small C function to just copy out the values. Seems to work fast enough for now. –  Gaidin Oct 7 '12 at 2:19
    
I'm not sure I understood you correctly. I edited my answer but it's not clear to me where do you need a []byte –  Inuart Oct 9 '12 at 10:13

Here's a way to pass a pointer to a go array to a C function, so the C function can populate it:

package main
/*
#include <stdio.h>
void getMatrix(float *m) {
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < 16; i++) {
        m[i] = (float)i;
    }
}
*/
import "C"
import "fmt"
func main() {
    var a [16]float32
    C.getMatrix((*C.float)(&a[0]))
    fmt.Println(a)
}
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I think that the Go type you'll have to use is

*[16]*float32

In any case the [][]float32 is never going to be compatible with **float of C.

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That's what I thought, but all references to this api call refer to a matrix built with a 4x4 array of arrays. –  Gaidin May 24 '12 at 4:53
    
Depends on the C's concrete declaration (unfortunately not shown in the question). Atom's answer is probably correct, I'll give it a try ;-) –  zzzz May 24 '12 at 10:10
    
Maybe off topic, but what would be the point of having a pointer to a pointer to a matrix? –  Gaidin May 24 '12 at 13:26

Pointer to 4x4 array of arrays has type *[4]*[4]float32.

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My information was originally incorrect, I've updated the question. –  Gaidin May 25 '12 at 1:23

Extending on the answer provided by Inuart:

package main

/*
#include <stdio.h>
void getMatrix(const float **matrix){
    float *m = (float *)*matrix;
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i<16; i++) {
       printf("%f\n",m[i]);
    }
}
*/
import "C"

import "unsafe"

func main() {
    // Create the contiguous 16 element array, but organise it how it is described.
    a := [4][4]float32{
        {1, 2, 3, 4},
        {5, 6, 7, 8},
        {9, 10, 11, 12},
        {13, 14, 15, 16},
    }
    m := &a // Take the pointer.
    C.getMatrix((**C.float)(unsafe.Pointer(&m))) // Take the handle and pass it.
}

This give you the handle behaviour that you seem to be asking for and has the advantage that the shape of the data in Go is as it appears to be asked for by the C API - there's no need to eschew the ease of use and safety of Go, just because you are interfacing with C.

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I feel like this just happens to work and may break in the future. The reason you are forced to get the address of the first element of an array in Go (and not the address of the array itself) is because they want implementation freedom for the memory area at the start of the array. The only guarantee Go gives you is that the items of the array will be together in memory. –  Yobert Apr 4 '13 at 20:35
    
The index is not necessary since the array is not a slice. While an alternative implementation may break this approach, any use of shared memory between C and Go depends on the model that array elements are contiguously arranged in memory. This answer is no different in this regard and would break under the same conditions (unless a non sane implementation were used that stored information in an array header rather than dealing with type information at compile time). BTW the spec does not guarantee that array elements are adjacent. –  kortschak Apr 5 '13 at 23:39

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