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I'm writing integration tests using Rspec and Capybara. I've noticed that quite often I have to execute the same bits of code when it comes to testing the creation of activerecord options.

For instance:

it "should create a new instance" do
  # I create an instance here
end

it "should do something based on a new instance" do
  # I create an instance here
  # I click into the record and add a sub record, or something else
end

The problem seems to be that ActiveRecord objects aren't persisted across tests, however Capybara by default maintains the same session in a spec (weirdness).

I could mock these records, but since this is an integration test and some of these records are pretty complicated (they have image attachments and whatnot) it's much simpler to use Capybara and fill out the user-facing forms.

I've tried defining a function that creates a new record, but that doesn't feel right for some reason. What's the best practice for this?

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rememeber that all Examples (it is your it code) is wrapped in transacation. I think it's good addiction for @Adam answer –  caulfield May 23 '12 at 22:15

5 Answers 5

There are a couple different ways to go here. First of all, in both cases, you can group your example blocks under either a describe or context block, like this:

describe "your instance" do
  it "..." do
    # do stuff here
  end

  it "..." do
    # do other stuff here
  end
end

Then, within the describe or context block, you can set up state that can be used in all the examples, like this:

describe "your instance" do
  # run before each example block under the describe block
  before(:each) do
    # I create an instance here
  end

  it "creates a new instance" do
    # do stuff here
  end

  it "do something based on a new instance" do
    # do other stuff here
  end
end

As an alternative to the before(:each) block, you can also use let helper, which I find a little more readable. You can see more about it here.

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The very best practice for your requirements is to use Factory Girl for creating records from a blueprint which define common attributes and database_cleaner to clean database across different tests/specs.

And never keep state (such as created records) across different specs, it will lead to dependent specs. You could spot this kind of dependencies using the --order rand option of rspec. If your specs fails randomly you have this kind of issue.

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1  
+1'd for mentioning --order rand. –  Sergio Tulentsev May 27 '12 at 0:32

Given the title (...reusing code in Rspec) I suggest the reading of RSpec custom matchers in the "Ruby on Rails Tutorial".

Michael Hartl suggests two solutions to duplication in specs:

  1. Define helper methods for common operations (e.g. log in a user)
  2. Define custom matchers

Use these stuff help decoupling the tests from the implementation.

In addition to these I suggest (as Fabio said) to use FactoryGirl.

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You could check my sample rails project. You could find there: https://github.com/lucassus/locomotive

  • how to use factory_girl
  • some examples of custom matchers and macros (in spec/support)
  • how to use shared_examples
  • and finally how to use very nice shoulda-macros
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Where is your sample rails project? –  Aldo 'xoen' Giambelluca May 28 '12 at 7:28
    
Sorry, somehow I missed the link: github.com/lucassus/locomotive –  luacassus May 28 '12 at 17:13
    
Thanks for sharing ;) –  Aldo 'xoen' Giambelluca May 28 '12 at 19:45

I would use a combination of factory_girl and Rspec's let method:

describe User do
  let(:user) { create :user } # 'create' is a factory_girl method, that will save a new user in the test database

  it "should be able to run" do
    user.run.should be_true
  end

  it "should not be able to walk" do
    user.walk.should be_false
  end
end


# spec/factories/users.rb
FactoryGirl.define do
  factory :user do
    email { Faker::Internet.email }
    username { Faker::Internet.user_name }
  end
end

This allows you to do great stuff like this:

describe User do
  let(:user) { create :user, attributes }
  let(:attributes) { Hash.new }

  it "should be able to run" do
    user.run.should be_true
  end

  it "should not be able to walk" do
    user.walk.should be_false
  end

  context "when user is admin" do
    let(:attributes) { { admin: true } }
    it "should be able to walk" do
      user.walk.should be_true
    end
  end
end
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