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I have a large family of objects all descended from a single parent. The objects all know how to tell if they have been modified, but I also need to be able to see if a new instance of an object has been modified compared to one I already have in memory (testing to see if someone else updated the database while the object was being edited.)

The result is that every child class has to contain the same method:

public new bool Changed()
{
    return Changed(this);
}

This really sticks in my craw but I see no way around it as the real work needs to be done by a function that takes a parameter of the same type as the class it's in — thus it can't be virtual. (Sure, I could define it to take the parent and cast it each time but that makes the comparison function accept any object in the tree rather than only the right one, and it requires the guard code in each instance, again something ugly.)

Of course this works but I dislike ugly code.

Update: As for the Changed function, each object retains a copy of its state when it's been loaded.

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Maybe you can elaborate on your Changed(), share some concrete example. I could adjust my example according to that –  skarmats May 23 '12 at 23:16
    
Changed(SomeDerivedType o) is implemented in each of the derived classes? A few lines with an example of your base class and a derived class really would help along :-) I'll call it a night now –  skarmats May 23 '12 at 23:43
    
@skarmats: You're right that each derived class implements Changed(<it's own type> o). Each checks it's own fields and calls the base to check any parent fields. –  Loren Pechtel May 23 '12 at 23:48

3 Answers 3

As long as your base class is abstract, you can do something like this:

abstract class Base
{
    public abstract bool Changed<T>(T obj) where T : Base;

    public bool Changed()
    {
        return Changed(this);
    }
}

class Subclass : Base
{
    public override bool Changed<Subclass>(Subclass obj)
    {
        // Do stuff here
    }
}
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It LOOKS like what I want--but it doesn't compile. I'm not sure what's happening but the parameter contains only the fields of the parent, not the fields of the current class that I need to look at. –  Loren Pechtel May 23 '12 at 23:16
    
The only thing I might change is to make Changed of T to be protected. I would think you would want to always call the base Changed external to the class. –  user957902 May 23 '12 at 23:19
    
I just tried a test case and get the same results. Becuase of the constraint on the generic to clases derrived from Base, the method can only see the members of Base. –  user957902 May 23 '12 at 23:27
    
Found a work around. You can cast the obj parameter to a fully qualified name of the type and get access to the properties: MyNamespace.Subclass refObj = obj as MyNamespace.Subclass. You can get to all the props via refObj then. If you do not use the full namespace it appears to still think its the of T parameter –  user957902 May 23 '12 at 23:33
    
Added code example of work around as additional answer. –  user957902 May 23 '12 at 23:47

The basic structure:

public abstract class Base<T> where T : Base<T>
{
    public T Original { get; private set; }

    public abstract bool Changed(T o);

    public bool Changed()
    {
        return this.Changed(Original);
    }
}

public class DerivedA : Base<DerivedA>
{
    public override bool Changed(DerivedA o)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

public class DerivedB : Base<DerivedB>
{
    public override bool Changed(DerivedB o)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

While it has its cons (readiblity), it could be the right choice in this case, since your issue isn't type protection in the classical Animal/Dog/Cat sense, but code sharing.

To prevent this scenario:

public class DerivedC : DerivedB
{
}
new DerivedB().Changed(new DerivedC()); // compiles

you could seal DerivedB.

Or you could continue the craziness (I would not recommend this. Definitely not further than this level):

public abstract class DerivedE<T> : Base<DerivedE<T>> where T : DerivedE<T>
{
}

public class DerivedF : DerivedE<DerivedF>
{
}

public class DerivedG : DerivedE<DerivedG>
{
}

new DerivedF().Changed(new DerivedG()); // does not compile
new DerivedF().Changed(new DerivedF()); // does compile

See this http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/02/03/curiouser-and-curiouser.aspx. I got the inspiration from that article. He discusses cons and pros.

EDIT: Cleaned-up, adjusted according to comments

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Another answer that doesn't compile: It complains the type is not generic and can't be used as a type argument. –  Loren Pechtel May 23 '12 at 23:25
    
My basic example does compile. Please share a bit more about your code and I'd be happy to look into it. See my comment on the OP –  skarmats May 23 '12 at 23:27
    
I didn't say the derived classes aren't getting inherited, some of them are. Anyway, the error is "The non-generic type <DerivedName> cannot be used with type arguments", it's thrown on the class line. –  Loren Pechtel May 23 '12 at 23:33
    
You do need to apply the principle I showcased above to your own classes. If you don't declare your base class generic, this cannot work. –  skarmats May 23 '12 at 23:37
    
I invite you to play around with my basic example to get a feel for the solution –  skarmats May 23 '12 at 23:37

Same answer as minitech, so he should get the credit, but in this example the Changed of SubclassA can see its properties by casting to the fully named class.

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{

    abstract class Base 
    {     
        protected abstract bool Changed<T>(T obj) where T : Base;      
        public bool Changed()     
        {         
            return Changed(this);     
        }

        public String PropBase { get; set; }
    }  

    class SubclassA : Base 
    {
        public String PropA { get; set; }

        protected override bool Changed<SubclassA>(SubclassA obj)     
        {
            ConsoleApplication1.SubclassA myInstance = obj as ConsoleApplication1.SubclassA;
            // Now can see PropA
            myInstance.PropA = "A";
            return true;
        }


    }

    class SubclassB : Base
    {
        protected override bool Changed<SubclassB>(SubclassB obj)
        {
            // can't see prop B here 
            // obj.PropB = "B";
            return true;
        }

        public String PropB { get; set; }
    } 


    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            SubclassB x = new SubclassB();

            x.Changed();

            Base y = new SubclassA();

            y.Changed();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm really puzzled here--it still doesn't see it even with the cast! –  Loren Pechtel May 23 '12 at 23:55
    
What version of .Net are you tageting ? This works for me in .Net 4.0 –  user957902 May 24 '12 at 11:56
    
Test case works for both .Net 3.5 and .Net 4.0. Note that I do have SP1 for .Net 4.0 and VS2010 installed. –  user957902 May 24 '12 at 13:47

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