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I know the feature doesn't exist in C#, but PHP recently added a feature called Traits which I thought was a bit silly at first until I started thinking about it.

Say I have a base class called Client. Client has a single property called Name.

Now I'm developing a re-usable application that will be used by many different customers. All customers agree that a client should have a name, hence it being in the base-class.

Now Customer A comes along and says he also need to track the client's Weight. Customer B doesn't need the Weight, but he wants to track Height. Customer C wants to track both Weight and Height.

With traits, we could make the both the Weight and the Height features traits:

class ClientA extends Client use TClientWeight
class ClientB extends Client use TClientHeight
class ClientC extends Client use TClientWeight, TClientHeight

Now I can meet all my customers' needs without adding any extra fluff to the class. If my customer comes back later and says "Oh, I really like that feature, can I have it too?", I just update the class definition to include the extra trait.

How would you accomplish this in C#?

Interfaces don't work here because I want concrete definitions for the properties and any associated methods, and I don't want to re-implement them for each version of the class.

(By "customer", I mean a literal person who has employed me as a developer, whereas by "client" I'm referring a programming class; each of my customers has clients that they want to record information about)


Building on what Lucero suggested, I came up with this:

internal class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var a = new ClientA("Adam", 68);
        var b = new ClientB("Bob", 1.75);
        var c = new ClientC("Cheryl", 54.4, 1.65);

        Console.WriteLine("{0} is {1:0.0} lbs.", a.Name, a.WeightPounds());
        Console.WriteLine("{0} is {1:0.0} inches tall.", b.Name, b.HeightInches());
        Console.WriteLine("{0} is {1:0.0} lbs and {2:0.0} inches.", c.Name, c.WeightPounds(), c.HeightInches());
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

public class Client
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public Client(string name)
    {
        Name = name;
    }
}

public interface IWeight
{
    double Weight { get; set; }
}

public interface IHeight
{
    double Height { get; set; }
}

public class ClientA : Client, IWeight
{
    public double Weight { get; set; }
    public ClientA(string name, double weight) : base(name)
    {
        Weight = weight;
    }
}

public class ClientB : Client, IHeight
{
    public double Height { get; set; }
    public ClientB(string name, double height) : base(name)
    {
        Height = height;
    }
}

public class ClientC : Client, IWeight, IHeight
{
    public double Weight { get; set; }
    public double Height { get; set; }
    public ClientC(string name, double weight, double height) : base(name)
    {
        Weight = weight;
        Height = height;
    }
}

public static class ClientExt
{
    public static double HeightInches(this IHeight client)
    {
        return client.Height * 39.3700787;
    }

    public static double WeightPounds(this IWeight client)
    {
        return client.Weight * 2.20462262;
    }
}

Output:

Adam is 149.9 lbs.
Bob is 68.9 inches tall.
Cheryl is 119.9 lbs and 65.0 inches.

It isn't quite as nice as I'd like, but it's not too bad either.

share|improve this question
1  
Well, you can quite perfectly simulate traits in C# by using marker interfaces and extension methods. –  Lucero May 23 '12 at 23:27
1  
@Lucero Those are not traits and lack the ability to add new members (among other things). Nevertheless, extension methods are nifty. –  user166390 May 23 '12 at 23:29
2  
@Lucero: That would work for adding extra methods, but what if I want to store additional data on the client object as well? –  Mark May 23 '12 at 23:29
1  
@Mark, then you need to have some ability to dynamically store data on arbitrary objects, which is not a feature of the runtime. I'll add some info on my answer on that regard. –  Lucero May 23 '12 at 23:45
    
@Lucero And is an issue that is solved by Traits... ;-) –  user166390 May 23 '12 at 23:49

8 Answers 8

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can get the syntax by using marker interfaces and extension methods.

Prerequisite: the interfaces need to define the contract which is later used by the extension method. Basically the interface defines the contract for being able to "implement" a trait; ideally the class where you add the interface should already have all members of the interface present so that no additional implementation is required.

public class Client {
  public double Weight { get; }

  public double Height { get; }
}

public interface TClientWeight {
  double Weight { get; }
}

public interface TClientHeight {
  double Height { get; }
}

public class ClientA: Client, TClientWeight { }

public class ClientB: Client, TClientHeight { }

public class ClientC: Client, TClientWeight, TClientHeight { }

public static class TClientWeightMethods {
  public static bool IsHeavierThan(this TClientWeight client, double weight) {
    return client.Weight > weight;
  }
  // add more methods as you see fit
}

public static class TClientHeightMethods {
  public static bool IsTallerThan(this TClientHeight client, double height) {
    return client.Height > height;
  }
  // add more methods as you see fit
}

Use like this:

var c1 = new Class1();
c1.IsHeavierThan(10); // OK
c1.IsTallerThan(10); // compiler error

Edit: The question was raised how additional data could be stored. This can also be addressed by doing some extra coding:

public interface IDynamicObject {
  bool TryGetAttribute(string key, out object value);
  void SetAttribute(string key, object value);
  // void RemoveAttribute(string key)
}

public class DynamicObject: IDynamicObject {
  private readonly Dictionary<string, object> data = new Dictionary<string, object>(StringComparer.Ordinal);

  bool IDynamicObject.TryGetAttribute(string key, out object value) {
    return data.TryGet(key, out value);
  }

  void IDynamicObject.SetAttribute(string key, object value) {
    data[key] = value;
  }
}

And then, the trait methods can add and retrieve data if the "trait interface" inherits from IDynamicObject:

public class Client: DynamicObject { /* implementation see above */ }

public interface TClientWeight, IDynamicObject {
  double Weight { get; }
}

public class ClientA: Client, TClientWeight { }

public static class TClientWeightMethods {
  public static bool HasWeightChanged(this TClientWeight client) {
    object oldWeight;
    bool result = client.TryGetAttribute("oldWeight", out oldWeight) && client.Weight.Equals(oldWeight);
    client.SetAttribute("oldWeight", client.Weight);
    return result;
  }
  // add more methods as you see fit
}

Note: by implementing IDynamicMetaObjectProvider as well the object would even allow to expose the dynamic data through the DLR, making the access to the additional properties transparent when used with the dynamic keyword.

share|improve this answer
1  
So you're saying put all the data in the base class, and all the method implementations in extension methods that have hooks on the interfaces? It's curious solution, but perhaps workable. My only beef is that you're making the client classes carry a lot of "dead weight" (unused members). With some fancy serialization it won't need to be saved to disk, but it's still consuming memory. –  Mark May 23 '12 at 23:46
    
"Sort of". I sure can't think of anything better within the C# language, so +1. I do not give this the same footing as a Trait, however. (A sever limitation is outlined by Mark.) –  user166390 May 23 '12 at 23:46
    
Err.. I guess with C# properties I only have to implement the property for each derived class and I can store the data there. It's a little bit redundant, but I guess it's better than re-implementing all the methods too. –  Mark May 23 '12 at 23:48
    
To complete this answer, I'd still like to see you define a concrete member variable (all I see is properties). I'm not sure if you intend for me to define them in Client, or redefine them multiple times in ClientB and ClientC as needed. –  Mark May 23 '12 at 23:58
1  
@Mark, see my updates for dynamic data storage (implementing the serialization is left as an excercise to the reader ;) ). Since interfaces cannot define contracts for fields you cannot use fields as part of the "trait", but of course the properties can be read-write! I'm not saying that C# has traits, but rather that the extension methods can serve as reusable code blocks for interfaces, so that re-implementation of the methods is not required; of course the code has to have all needed members readily available on the interface. –  Lucero May 24 '12 at 0:07

C# language (at least to version 5) does not have support for Traits.

However, Scala has Traits and Scala runs on the JVM (and CLR). Therefore, it's not a matter of run-time, but simply that of the language.

Consider that Traits, at least at the Scala sense, can be thought of as "pretty magic to compile in proxy methods" (they do not affect the MRO, which is different from Mixins in Ruby). In C# the way to get this behavior would be to use interfaces and "lots of manual proxy methods" (e.g. composition).

This tedious process could be done with a hypothetical processor (perhaps automatic code generation for a partial class via templates?), but that's not C#.

Happy coding.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not exactly sure what this answers. Are you suggesting that I should hack together something to pre-process my C# code? –  Mark May 23 '12 at 23:32
    
@Mark No. I was 1) Suggesting C#, the language, cannot support it (although perhaps with dynamic proxies? This level of magic is beyond me.) 2) That Traits do not affect the MRO and can be "simulated by hand"; that is, a Trait can be flattened into every Class it is mixed into, as with Composition. –  user166390 May 23 '12 at 23:33
1  
@Mark Ahh, Method Resolution Order. That is, Traits (again, in the Scala sense which are still based on Single Inheritance run-time) do not actually affect the class hierarchy. There is no "trait class" added to the [virtual] dispatch tables. The methods/properties in the Traits are copied (during completing) into the respective classes. Here is are some papers about traits as used in Scala. Ordersky presents that Traits can be used in a SI runtime, which is why they are "baked in" at compilation. –  user166390 May 23 '12 at 23:38
1  
@Mark This differs from a language like Ruby which will inject the "mixin" type (a form of traits) into the MRO (which is a form of alternating the class hierarchy, but with control and restrictions). –  user166390 May 23 '12 at 23:43
1  
I'm hesitant to upvote you because you haven't provided me with anything concrete yet, just a lot of talk about other languages. I'm trying to figure out how I can borrow some of these ideas from Scala....but that's all built-in to the language. How's it transferable? –  Mark May 23 '12 at 23:50

This is really an suggested extension to Lucero's answer where all the storage was in the base class.

How about using dependency properties for this?

This would have the effect of making the client classes light weight at run time when you have many properties that are not always set by every descendant. This is because the values are stored in a static member.

using System.Windows;

public class Client : DependencyObject
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public Client(string name)
    {
        Name = name;
    }

    //add to descendant to use
    //public double Weight
    //{
    //    get { return (double)GetValue(WeightProperty); }
    //    set { SetValue(WeightProperty, value); }
    //}

    public static readonly DependencyProperty WeightProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("Weight", typeof(double), typeof(Client), new PropertyMetadata());


    //add to descendant to use
    //public double Height
    //{
    //    get { return (double)GetValue(HeightProperty); }
    //    set { SetValue(HeightProperty, value); }
    //}

    public static readonly DependencyProperty HeightProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("Height", typeof(double), typeof(Client), new PropertyMetadata());
}

public interface IWeight
{
    double Weight { get; set; }
}

public interface IHeight
{
    double Height { get; set; }
}

public class ClientA : Client, IWeight
{
    public double Weight
    {
        get { return (double)GetValue(WeightProperty); }
        set { SetValue(WeightProperty, value); }
    }

    public ClientA(string name, double weight)
        : base(name)
    {
        Weight = weight;
    }
}

public class ClientB : Client, IHeight
{
    public double Height
    {
        get { return (double)GetValue(HeightProperty); }
        set { SetValue(HeightProperty, value); }
    }

    public ClientB(string name, double height)
        : base(name)
    {
        Height = height;
    }
}

public class ClientC : Client, IHeight, IWeight
{
    public double Height
    {
        get { return (double)GetValue(HeightProperty); }
        set { SetValue(HeightProperty, value); }
    }

    public double Weight
    {
        get { return (double)GetValue(WeightProperty); }
        set { SetValue(WeightProperty, value); }
    }

    public ClientC(string name, double weight, double height)
        : base(name)
    {
        Weight = weight;
        Height = height;
    }

}

public static class ClientExt
{
    public static double HeightInches(this IHeight client)
    {
        return client.Height * 39.3700787;
    }

    public static double WeightPounds(this IWeight client)
    {
        return client.Weight * 2.20462262;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

There is an academic project, developed by Stefan Reichart from the Software Composition Group at the University of Bern (Switzerland), which provides a true implementation of traits to the C# language.

Have a look at the paper (PDF) on CSharpT for the full description of what he has done, based on the mono compiler.

Here is a sample of what can be written:

trait TCircle
{
    public int Radius { get; set; }
    public int Surface { get { ... } }
}

trait TColor { ... }

class MyCircle
{
    uses { TCircle; TColor }
}
share|improve this answer

This sounds like PHP's version of Aspect Oriented Programming. There are tools to help like PostSharp or MS Unity in some cases. If you want to roll-your-own, code-injection using C# Attributes is one approach, or as suggested extension methods for limited cases.

Really depends how complicated you want to get. If you are trying to build something complex I'd be looking at some of these tools to help.

share|improve this answer
    
Does AoP/PostSharp/Unity allow adding new members that become part of the static type system? (My limited AoP experience was just with annotation cut-points and similar..) –  user166390 May 24 '12 at 0:03
    
PostSharp rewrites the IL code and should be able to do that, yes. –  Lucero May 24 '12 at 0:15
    
Yes I believe so, via aspects for member/interface introduction (at the IL level as noted). My experience is limited also, but I've not had much practical opportunity to get too deep into this approach. –  RJ Lohan May 24 '12 at 0:38

I'd like to point to NRoles, an experiment with roles in C#, where roles are similar to traits.

NRoles uses a post-compiler to rewrite the IL and inject the methods into a class. This allows you to write code like that:

public class RSwitchable : Role
{
    private bool on = false;
    public void TurnOn() { on = true; }
    public void TurnOff() { on = false; }
    public bool IsOn { get { return on; } }
    public bool IsOff { get { return !on; } }
}

public class RTunable : Role
{
    public int Channel { get; private set; }
    public void Seek(int step) { Channel += step; }
}

public class Radio : Does<RSwitchable>, Does<RTunable> { }

where class Radio implements RSwitchable and RTunable. Behind the scenes, Does<R> is an interface with no members, so basically Radio compiles to an empty class. The post-compilation IL rewriting injects the methods of RSwitchable and RTunable into Radio, which can then be used as if it really derived from the two roles (from another assembly):

var radio = new Radio();
radio.TurnOn();
radio.Seek(42);

To use radio directly before rewriting happened (that is, in the same assembly as where the Radio type is declared), you have to resort to extensions methods As<R>():

radio.As<RSwitchable>().TurnOn();
radio.As<RTunable>().Seek(42);

since the compiler would not allow to call TurnOn or Seek directly on the Radio class.

share|improve this answer

I think you look for an Interface

interface TClientWeight {
    void foo {get; set;}
}

class Client {

}

class ClientA : Client, TClientWeight {
    void foo {get; set;}
}
share|improve this answer
3  
No. Interfaces are not Traits. Traits allow specifying an implementation, which makes them useful for code-reuse patterns without needed to subclass. –  user166390 May 23 '12 at 23:28
    
@pbaris: I specifically address this in my question. This isn't a solution. –  Mark May 23 '12 at 23:33

I've used Traits and honestly don't understand why they exist. It's more of a namespace feature then an OOP feature. It's a kind of short-hand way of encapsulating another object without having to write code to do it, or write the name of the encapsulated object to use it.

Once you understand that is all there is to it. It's very easy to use a traits pattern in C# by just using encapsulation.

Let's take a Model base class, create a Document class for it and also a trait that handles publishing called Publish.

/// <summary>
/// This is our generic base class.
/// </summary>
public abstract class Model
{
    /// <summary>
    /// A generic IO operation on models.
    /// </summary>
    public void Write(string value)
    {
        // blah blah
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// This is our trait class.
/// </summary>
public class Publish
{
    private Model _owner;

    public Publish(Model owner)
    {
        this._owner = owner;
    }

    public void ChangeStatus(string status)
    {
        // write a new status to the model
        _owner.Write(status);
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// This is our document class with the trait.
/// </summary>
public class Document : Model
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The contained trait.
    /// </summary>
    private Publish _publish;

    /// <summary>
    /// Public read-only access.
    /// </summary>
    public Publish Publish
    {
        get { return _publish; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Constructor creates the trait
    /// </summary>
    public Document()
    {
        this._publish = new Publish(this);
    }
}

Now once you've created this setup. You can use the Publish trait on the Document like this.

Document doc = new Document();
doc.Publish.ChangeStatus("review");

It's easy to add the Publish trait to any derived classes of Model and the Publish trait understands how to use a Model just like a real trait.

So what's the big deal about traits?

It reduces lines of code. Let's imagine that C# has a traits feature. The above code might be written something like this.

/// <summary>
/// This is our generic base class.
/// </summary>
public abstract class Model
{
    /// <summary>
    /// A generic IO operation on models.
    /// </summary>
    public void Write(string value)
    {
        // blah blah
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// This is our trait class.
/// </summary>
public class Publish traits Model
{
    public void ChangeStatus(Model owner, string status)
    {
        // write a new status to the model
        owner.Write(status);
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// This is our document class with the trait.
/// </summary>
public class Document : Model uses Publish
{
}

Now when we want to perform a trai method the code would like this.

Document doc = new Document();
doc.ChangeStatus("review");

We don't have to use the property and the trait feature would add the Document reference as the first parameter to ChangeStatus. Other than that, there isn't anything more to traits.

My only problem with this approach is that it pollutes the class interface with methods from the traits class. There are some languages where traits can be attached to an object after instantiation which further makes it harder to keep track of the class methods. They also make it very difficult for an IDE to use auto-completion while you are writing the code.

I'd want to get a much larger benefit from a language feature than that, because I'd experienced traits colliding with methods on an object and it causes a lot of refactoring pains.

share|improve this answer
1  
While I don't disagree, this could get a bit tedious when you have a lot of small "traits". Each "trait" might only add 1 or 2 properties, and now you're forced to throw them each into different buckets. I do, however, think I like this solution more than Lucero's route. –  Mark May 17 '13 at 22:29
    
If you wanted to get fancy. You could use partial classes to put the trait definitions for an object into a different CS file. This would help keep the code for the class less cluttered with trail properties. If you wanted to make it automatic then a custom compile tool to read class annotations to populate that file would help. –  Mathew Foscarini May 17 '13 at 23:51

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