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I recently learned about using C# extension methods to make calling events easier and I've been using them more and more. I recently hit a strange issue that I don't understand though, and I was wondering if someone could explain it.

The issue occurs when trying to set an eventhandler extension method as an event handler of another event. Here is an example of what I'm doing:

public static class EventHandlerExtensions
{
    public static void Raise<TEventArgs>(
        this EventHandler<TEventArgs> eventHandler, 
        object sender, TEventArgs args)  where TEventArgs:EventArgs
    {
        if (eventHandler != null)
        {
            eventHandler(sender, args);
        }
    }
}

public class Test
{
    private event EventHandler<EventArgs> EventA;
    private event EventHandler<EventArgs> EventB;

    public Test()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("::Start");
        EventB += EventA.Raise;
        EventA += (s, a) => Console.WriteLine("Event A raised");
        EventB.Raise(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        Console.WriteLine("::End");
    }
}

In this example, EventA should be triggered as a result of EventB being triggered. However, when I run this code, EventB fires, but the extension method on A doesn't find any listeners for it.

If I change the order around, everything works fine:

Console.WriteLine("::Start");
EventA += (s, a) => Console.WriteLine("Event A raised");
EventB += EventA.Raise;
EventB.Raise(this, EventArgs.Empty);
Console.WriteLine("::End");

Also, calling EventA.Raise from a lambda works fine:

Console.WriteLine("::Start");
EventB += (s, a) => EventA.Raise(s, a);
EventA += (s, a) => Console.WriteLine("Event A raised");
EventB.Raise(this, EventArgs.Empty);
Console.WriteLine("::End");

This is just a simple example, but I'm trying to create a class which can re-dispatch events of event sources added to it in the cleanest way possible. I don't want to create named methods just for redispatching the same events, and I'd rather not store lists of lambda functions that I can unhook from the event handlers later. Mostly, I'm just curious as to why this is happening?

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
That could get really bad if you have a lot of event handlers to which you subscribe. Good question, though !!! :) – IAbstract May 24 '12 at 1:46
    
When I write down your code in VS2010, typing EventA.R just after Console.WriteLine("Start"); doesn't show the extension method in intelllisense. It does if I type it just before Console.WriteLine("End");. Weird. – Guillaume May 24 '12 at 1:57
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You capture old value of EventA into the closure by your Raise function. Since later you use += it changes value of EventA, but your closure still have an old value.

You code:

EventB += EventA.Raise;
EventA += (s, a) => Console.WriteLine("Event A raised"); 

Can be expanded into equivalent code which makes it clear why you get old delegate:

var oldEventA = EventA;
EventB += oldEventA.Raise; // captures old value here
// now EventA changed to new value 
EventA = oldEventA + ((s, a) => Console.WriteLine("Event A raised");)

You can add following to before EventB += EventA.Raise to verify that code actually raises old event for A:

EventA += (s, a) => Console.WriteLine("Old Event A raised");
share|improve this answer

Delegate objects are immutable. Much like strings. So when you assign EventA, you create a new object. EventB is still targeting the old one, the one that didn't have any event handler assigned yet. You have to swap the two statements to fix the problem.

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