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I'm working on a program in c for a class that solves a sudoku puzzle. There are three methods that we are supposed to implement, first it places the correct number in each square that has only one possible choice, repeating until it can no longer find any. Next it uses brute force, placing the lowest possible number in each square. I have these two methods working. The final method is brute force with back tracking, which is a part of the brute force function. It works the same way as the regular brute force except, it it reaches a square that it can not place a number in it moves to the previous square and places the next highest number. Once this is implemented this should solve all given sudoku puzzle, but this is where I am having trouble.

I have implemented all three of the methods, and we have been given different example sudoku puzzles, some that can be solved using only the first "single choice" method, some that can be solved using only "single choice" and "brute force without backtracking" and others that use "single choice" and "brute force with backtracking". My program works with both the "single choice" puzzles and the "single choice" and "brute force without backtracking" puzzle. However, it does not work for the "single choice" and "brute force with backtracking" puzzles.

The strange part though that I don't understand is that, for the backtracking puzzles, the program stops working before the brute force function is even called.

Here's my main function:

#include <stdio.h>
#include "sudokusolver.h"
int main()
{
   int puzzle[9][9], i, j, count, attempts=0, backTracks=0;
   readSudoku(puzzle);
   printf("a\n");
   do
   {
      count=0;
      for(i=0;i<9;i++)
      {
         for(j=0;j<9;j++)
         {
            if(singleCandidate(puzzle, i, j)==1)
               count++;
         }
      }
   }while(count!=0);
   bruteForce(puzzle, &attempts, &backTracks);
   printSudoku(puzzle);
   return 0;
}

I used the "printf("a\n")" to show where the program stops working.

Here's an example of an output that works. This is an example sudoku puzzle that works using the "single choice" method and "brute force without backtracking". note that the zero's represent blank spaces in the puzzle.:

Enter line 1: 010042000
Enter line 2: 008053010
Enter line 3: 900071560
Enter line 4: 400700600
Enter line 5: 067205130
Enter line 6: 002004005
Enter line 7: 080430001
Enter line 8: 030120700
Enter line 9: 000580090
a
315|642|987
678|953|412
924|871|563
-----------
453|718|629
867|295|134
192|364|875
-----------
786|439|251
539|126|748
241|587|396

And here's an example of an output that does not work. this is an example puzzle that must be solved using "single choice" and "brute force with backtracking":

Enter line 1: 300910750
Enter line 2: 100570009
Enter line 3: 009000000
Enter line 4: 020740090
Enter line 5: 900000003
Enter line 6: 010069020
Enter line 7: 000000300
Enter line 8: 700085006
Enter line 9: 098034002
^C

The program continues to run, as if it is in an infinite loop and the ^C is me quitting out of the program. As you can see, the program never even reaches the printf("a") right below where it reads in the sudoku puzzle, and before it even calls the "brute force with backtracking" function, which is strange because it is only the puzzles that require brute force with backtracking that don't work.

Here's the readSudoku function that it seems to be getting stuck on:

void readSudoku(int puzzle[][9])
{
   int i, j;
   for(i=0;i<9;i++)
   {
      printf("Enter line %d: ", i+1);
      for(j=0;j<9;j++)
      {
         scanf("%1d", &puzzle[i][j]);
      }
   }
}

And here's the bruteforce function with backtracking implemented

void bruteForce(int puzzle[][9], int *attempt, int *backtracks)
{
   int stable[9][9], i, j, k, found=0, temp=0;
   for(i=0;i<9;i++)
   {
      for(j=0;j<9;j++)
      {
         if(puzzle[i][j]==0)
            stable[i][j]=0;
         else
            stable[i][j]=1;
      }
   }
   for(i=0;i<9;i++)
   {
      for(j=0;j<9;j++)
      {
         for(k=0;k<9;k++)
         {
            if(checkValid(puzzle, i, j, k+1)==1)
            {
               puzzle[i][j]=k+1;
               break;
            }
            if(k==8)
               break;
         }

         while(puzzle[i][j]==0)
         {
            found=0;
            temp=j-1;
            for(j=temp;j>=0;j--)
            {
               if(stable[i][j]==0)
               {
                  found=1;
                  break;
               }
            }
            temp=i-1;
            if(found==0)
            {
               for(i=temp;i>=0;i--)
               {
                  for(j=8;j>=0;j--)
                  {
                     if(stable[i][j]==0)
                     {
                        found=1;
                        break;
                     }
                  }
               if(found==1)
                  break;
               }
            }
            found=0;
            temp=puzzle[i][j]+1;
            for(k=temp;k<9;k++)
            {
               if(checkValid(puzzle, i, j, k+1)==1)
               {
                  found=1;
                  puzzle[i][j]=k+1;
                  break;
               }
            }
            if(found==0)
               puzzle[i][j]=0;
         }
      }
   }
}

This is a very strange problem that makes absolutely no sense to me and any help is appreciated.

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2  
I'm guessing it's stuck. (It may be that the "a" is buffered and hence isn't displayed. Try fflush(stdout); after the printf.) –  Hot Licks May 24 '12 at 2:43
    
@missingno: You are not supposed to edit the tags... –  Sani Huttunen May 24 '12 at 2:52
    
@HotLicks That would be unlikely since stdout is flushed with every newline, but it's still a valid thing to try. –  Guido May 24 '12 at 2:54
1  
The problem wasn't that the addition of the tag was wrong... But the addition should have come from the OP... I was told... –  Sani Huttunen May 24 '12 at 3:04
1  
Run the program in a debugger, and step through the code one line at a time. Then you can examine variables and check conditions in loops etc. –  Joachim Pileborg May 24 '12 at 5:13
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2 Answers 2

I would guess the problem might be in singleCandidate(). I can't see its source, but you should verify it does not return 1 when it does not change the puzzle because that leads to endless loop.

Also check how it behaves when you get an invalid input (i.e. when the sudoku has no solution).

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In your bruteForce, you have

/* No legal guess found, so backtrack */
while(puzzle[i][j]==0)
{
    /* Find previous guessed position */
    /* the last guess was as puzzle[i][j] */
    temp=puzzle[i][j]+1;
    for(k=temp;k<9;k++)
    {
        if(checkValid(puzzle, i, j, k+1)==1)
        {
            found=1;
            puzzle[i][j]=k+1;
            break;
        }
    }
    if(found==0)
       puzzle[i][j]=0;
}

So you set the starting value for k to one larger than the previous guess. But you try to set the cell to k+1, so you never try to set it to old_guess + 1.

Thus if you ever guessed correct_value - 1, you never try correct_value. For a puzzle requiring backtracking, it's overwhelmingly probable that at some point that situation occurs.

So, since found == 0, you set puzzle[i][j] = 0 and continue the backtrack, searching for the next guessed position.

But if you already are at the first guessed position,

found=0;
temp=j-1;
for(j=temp;j>=0;j--)
{
    if(stable[i][j]==0)
    {
        found=1;
        break;
    }
}
// Here, j == -1
 temp=i-1;
 if(found==0)
 {
     // if i == 0
     for(i=temp;i>=0;i--)
     {
     // i is set to -1 and the loop ends right now, with i == -1 and j == -1
     // if i was > 0, j is decremented from 8 to -1 for all i down to 0 in the inner loop
         for(j=8;j>=0;j--)
         {
             if(stable[i][j]==0)
             {
                 found=1;
                 break;
             }
         }
         if(found==1)
             break;
         // i is finally set to -1, with j still -1
     }
 }
 found=0;
 temp=puzzle[i][j]+1;

you are then accessing puzzle[-1][-1], invoking undefined behaviour.

If you are unlucky enough that that invalid memory access doesn't lead to a crash - as seems to be the case -, presumably checkValid(-1,-1,k+1) returns 1 for some k, then you start trying to solve the puzzle again, leading into the same loop.

Admittedly, printf("a\n"); should print out the a if the terminal is set to normal buffering mode, but I consider it more probable that the print buffer isn't flushed than that readSudoku magically detects puzzles requiring backtracking and refuses to work on them.

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