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I've got a Maven settings.xml file in my ~/.m2 directory; it looks like this:

<settings>
    <profiles>
        <profile>
            <id>mike</id>
            <properties>
                <db.driver>org.postgresql.Driver</db.driver>
                <db.type>postgresql</db.type>
                <db.host>localhost</db.host>
                <db.port>5432</db.port>
                <db.url>jdbc:${db.type}://${db.host}:${db.port}/dbname</db.url>
            </properties>
        </profile>
    </profiles>
    <activeProfiles>
        <activeProfile>mike</activeProfile>
    </activeProfiles>
    <servers>
        <server>
            <id>server_id</id>
            <username>mike</username>
            <password>{some_encrypted_password}</password>
        </server>
    </servers>
</settings>

I'd like to use these properties twice

  • Once inside Maven's integration-test phase to set up and tear down my database. Using Maven filtering, this is working perfectly.
  • A second time when running my Spring application, which means I need to substitute these properties into my servlet-context.xml file during Maven's resources:resources phase. For properties in the upper section of settings.xml, such as ${db.url}, this works fine. I cannot figure out how to substitute my database username and (decrypted) password into the Spring servlet-context.xml file.

The pertinent part of my servlet-context.xml file looks like:

<bean id="myDataSource" class="org.apache.commons.dbcp.BasicDataSource" destroy-method="close">
    <property name="driverClassName"><value>${db.driver}</value></property>
    <property name="url"><value>${db.url}</value></property>
    <property name="username"><value>${username}</value></property>
    <property name="password"><value>${password}</value></property>
</bean>

The end goal here is for each developer to have their own Maven settings (and database on their own machine for integration testing)...And a similar setup on the Jenkins server. We do not want to share a common username/password/etc.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is a way of filtering web resources by configuration of Maven War Plugin. Look at this for a snippet from official plugin's docs.

And by the way, I strongly recommend reconsidering this filtering-based way for providing de facto run-time configuration at build-time. Just notice that you have to rebuild the same code to just prepare package for another environment (or alternatively edit package contents). You can use application server's specific stuff for this (at least JBoss has one) or use Spring that AFAIR also can be configured like this.

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That point about recompiling is valid. I'm definitely going to have to look into that more, as it's an anti-pattern that I'm hoping to avoid. Definitely need this to run in a CI/CD style. But at the same time, I'm attempting to re-use the information that already exists and is stored in the settings.xml –  Mike May 24 '12 at 11:35
    
OK, it's really good you are going to refactor this. For now, as I said, use this web resources filtering. It should work and enable you to have this configuration in one place, as you said. –  Michal Kalinowski May 24 '12 at 11:43
    
Spring 3.1 introduced a load of new stuff for precisely this type of scenario: blog.springsource.org/2011/02/15/… –  artbristol May 24 '12 at 12:17
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I recommend you to use a property file in the middle. I mean: Spring application would load properties values form the property file using context:property-placeholder and Maven would be the one who replace ${...} variables using values from settings.xml using filtering.

Your property file:

db.driver=${db.driver}
db.url=${db.url}
username=${username}
password=${password}

Your servlet-context.xml file

<context:property-placeholder location="classpath:your-property-file.properties" />

<bean id="myDataSource" class="org.apache.commons.dbcp.BasicDataSource" destroy-method="close">
    <property name="driverClassName"><value>${db.driver}</value></property>
    <property name="url"><value>${db.url}</value></property>
    <property name="username"><value>${username}</value></property>
    <property name="password"><value>${password}</value></property>
</bean>

In your pom.xml

<resources>
    ...
    <resource>
        <directory>src/main/resources</directory>
        <filtering>true</filtering>
    </resource>
    ...
</resources>
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I haven't tried it, but as per this maven wiki page, you should be able to refer to properties in settings.xml using settings. prefix. So ${settings.servers.server.username} should ideally return the username in settings.xml.

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That is within the scope of Maven, not of Spring, so you could not access those at runtime, in Spring. You could only use them with the filter option. –  Joseph Lust Mar 20 '13 at 2:41
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