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Hey all i have some CSS code like so:

/* ROW 1 (1-8) */
#rsvpBadge0{position: absolute; top: -2px; left: -1px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
#rsvpBadge1{position: absolute; top: -2px; left: 74px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
#rsvpBadge2{position: absolute; top: -2px; left: 149px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
#rsvpBadge3{position: absolute; top: -2px; left: 224px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
#rsvpBadge4{position: absolute; top: -2px; left: 299px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
#rsvpBadge5{position: absolute; top: -2px; left: 374px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
#rsvpBadge6{position: absolute; top: -2px; left: 449px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
#rsvpBadge7{position: absolute; top: -2px; left: 524px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
/* ROW 2 (9-16) */
#rsvpBadge8{position: absolute; top: 68px; left: -1px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
#rsvpBadge9{position: absolute; top: 68px; left: 74px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
#rsvpBadge10{position: absolute; top: 68px; left: 149px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
#rsvpBadge11{position: absolute; top: 68px; left: 224px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
#rsvpBadge12{position: absolute; top: 68px; left: 299px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
#rsvpBadge13{position: absolute; top: 68px; left: 374px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
#rsvpBadge14{position: absolute; top: 68px; left: 449px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}
#rsvpBadge15{position: absolute; top: 68px; left: 524px; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}

etc etc....

Now i have this the same way going from 1 to 207. It works but the problem i am seeing is it looks fine in FireFox (the top and left coordinates are spot on) but when i view it in IE and Chrome, they are a little off of the top value (needs to be raised a little bit more)

So my question to you all is:

1) How can i shorten the code knowing that each rsvpBadge has a different number and top value?

2) Correct the coordinates for IE and chrome without having to make 3 more 1-209 layers for each browser.

Here is a visual

enter image description here

On the left is what it looks like in Chrome and on the right, FireFox.

share|improve this question
    
you can use loop but that will need php or javascript –  user1432124 May 24 '12 at 4:46
2  
To get rid of cross browser inconsistencies, use a reset CSS:meyerweb.com/eric/tools/css/reset –  xbonez May 24 '12 at 4:47
    
    
@xbonez comment is the answer to part B –  Steve Robillard May 24 '12 at 4:53
    
Why must you be positioned absolutely? Have you considered restructuring your document? –  Second Rikudo May 24 '12 at 5:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Floating these elements seems appropriate:

.rsvp-badge{z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;float:left;}

After that is done, add clear:left; to every element that begins a row.

Even better: place all elements in a container of a fixed width so that every row fits 8 elements each.

Update:

A-ha! So that's what an rsvp-badge is supposed to be.

You'd get away with a couple rule using pseudo-elements:

<div class="user-photo has-rsvpd"></div>
<div class="user-photo"></div>

.user-photo {
    /*size,background etc. ommited*/
    position:relative;/*to allow position:absolude on pseudo-element*/
}
.has-rsvpd:after {
     /*size,background etc. ommited*/
     content:"";position:absolute;top:0;left:0;/*apply to top left corner*/
}

Or restructuring HTML a bit (which, depending on archtecture, could be appropriate at runtime):

<div class="user-photo has-rsvpd"><span class="rsvp-badge"></span></div>
<div class="user-photo"><span class="rsvp-badge"></span></div>

.rsvp-badge {
     display:none;/*hide when user has not rsvpd*/
}
.has-rsvpd .rsvp-badge{
     /*same as :after in the sample above, but without a content property*/
}
share|improve this answer
    
You approach does not work. It needs to be absolute or it moves the image from being on top of it to being next to it. –  StealthRT May 24 '12 at 5:10
    
@StealthRT: what is "it"? on top of "what"? please commit the effort of uploading a sample to jsfiddle –  o.v. May 24 '12 at 5:13
    
@stealthrt: Have you considered making the image as a background? –  Second Rikudo May 24 '12 at 5:18
    
@Truth: It needs to be over the image.. its a banner image. –  StealthRT May 24 '12 at 5:19
    
I have updated my OP. –  StealthRT May 24 '12 at 5:24

If you don't want to use javascript or floating, can you change the html? Then add classes to the elements because (instead of ids) classes don't have to be unique, e.g.:

<div class="rsvpBadgeAll rsvpBadgeLeft0 rsvpBadgeTop0">...</div>
<div class="rsvpBadgeAll rsvpBadgeLeft1 rsvpBadgeTop0">...</div>
...
<div class="rsvpBadgeAll rsvpBadgeLeft7 rsvpBadgeTop0">...</div>
<div class="rsvpBadgeAll rsvpBadgeLeft0 rsvpBadgeTop1">...</div>
...
<div class="rsvpBadgeAll rsvpBadgeLeft7 rsvpBadgeTop1">...</div>
...

And also define the css with classes instead of ids, e.g.:

.rsvpBadgeAll { position: absolute; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px; }

.rsvpBadgeLeft0 { left: -1px; }
.rsvpBadgeLeft1 { left: 74px; }
.rsvpBadgeLeft2 { left: 149px; }
.rsvpBadgeLeft3 { left: 224px; }
.rsvpBadgeLeft4 { left: 299px; }
.rsvpBadgeLeft5 { left: 374px; }
.rsvpBadgeLeft6 { left: 449px; }
.rsvpBadgeLeft7 { left: 524px; }

.rsvpBadgeTop0 { top: -2px; }
.rsvpBadgeTop1 { top: 68px; }
.rsvpBadgeTop2 { top: ...px; }
...
.rsvpBadgeTop25 { top: ...px; }
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for suggesting the HTML change. However there is probably a better solution than using position absolute. –  Second Rikudo May 24 '12 at 5:19
    
I have updated my OP. –  StealthRT May 24 '12 at 5:30
    
My answer is for question 1) (reducing the css code). For question 2) Have you seen xbonez comment? Have you tried adding the reset css? –  scessor May 24 '12 at 5:36
    
@scessor: Resetting it made it look like it does in Chrome no matter what browser. –  StealthRT May 24 '12 at 5:43
    
@scessor: Shouldnt it be: rsvpBadgeAll rsvpBadgeLeft0 rsvpBadgeTop0 - rsvpBadgeAll rsvpBadgeLeft7 rsvpBadgeTop0 then rsvpBadgeAll rsvpBadgeLeft0 rsvpBadgeTop1 - rsvpBadgeAll rsvpBadgeLeft7 rsvpBadgeTop1 etc etc? –  StealthRT May 24 '12 at 5:47

In CSS you can put only

    #rsvpBadge{position: absolute; z-index: 2; width: 50px; height: 50px;}

    #rsvpBadge0{ top:<x>, left:<x>}
    #rsvpBadge1{ top:<x>, left:<x>}
    #rsvpBadge2{ top:<x>, left:<x>}

........and so on And write a javascript for calculating the top and left as per screen size.

share|improve this answer
    
what about #rsvpbadge1 –  user1432124 May 24 '12 at 4:49
    
Put a common class on all, or some other (correct) css selector. –  Phrogz May 24 '12 at 4:52
    
same thing with #rsvpBadge1 –  Ganesh Bora May 24 '12 at 4:54
    
An element may only have one ID and that ID is also unique to the entire document. For what you are trying to achieve you must use a class name. –  Second Rikudo May 24 '12 at 5:30

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