Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
string foo;
try
{
    foo = "test"; // yeah, i know ...
}
catch // yeah, i know this one too :)
{
    foo = null;
}
finally
{
    Console.WriteLine(foo); // argh ... @#!
}
Console.WriteLine(foo); // but nothing to complain about here

Besides it's not BP (catching-routing) - but this is the best isolation I can get.
But I get nice waves telling me "danger, danger - might be uninitialized". How comes?

Edit:
Please do not suggest "Simply put a string foo = string.Empty; at the 'declaration'". I'd like to declare it, but just do the assignment on time!

share|improve this question
    
Assign a null, this is efficient and will appease the compiler, then get rid of the catch entirely. –  Adam Houldsworth May 24 '12 at 7:12
    
@AdamHouldsworth i've mentioned that this is an isolated example, didn't i? i have to use the catch in my real scenario, because i have some other code in there :) –  Andreas Niedermair May 24 '12 at 7:13
    
yes you did but you have yet to provide a solid argument for not initializing it with null beforehand. You stated in another comment that you didn't want to do that. Manojlds answer is likely the reason, the finally is considered out of the try scope so the MSDN docs entry still stands. –  Adam Houldsworth May 24 '12 at 7:22
    
@AdamHouldsworth it's just against my nature to workaround the cool feature of splitted declaration and assignment/initialization - at that time i'll do this, i could argue: "why is there still splitted declaration and assignment/initialization ?? i could do a 'foo'-assignment at the start" ... :) –  Andreas Niedermair May 24 '12 at 7:25
    
@AdamHouldsworth btw ... codinghorror.com/blog/2005/07/… –  Andreas Niedermair May 24 '12 at 7:42
show 4 more comments

6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Some background from the C# specification (5.3.3.14):

For a try statement stmt of the form:

try try-block finally finally-block

(...)

The definite assignment state of v at the beginning of finally-block is the same as the definite assignment state of v at the beginning of stmt.

Edit Try-Catch-Finally(5.3.3.15):

Definite assignment analysis for a try-catch-finally statement (...) is done as if the statement were a try-finally statement enclosing a try-catch statement

The following example demonstrates how the different blocks of a try statement (§8.10) affect definite assignment.

class A
{
  static void F() 
  {
    int i, j;
    try {
      goto LABEL;
      // neither i nor j definitely assigned
      i = 1;
      // i definitely assigned
    }
    catch {
      // neither i nor j definitely assigned
      i = 3;
      // i definitely assigned
    }
    finally {
      // neither i nor j definitely assigned
      j = 5;
      // j definitely assigned
    }
    // i and j definitely assigned
    LABEL:;
    // j definitely assigned
  }
}

I just thought of an example that shows the problem better:

int i;
try
{
    i = int.Parse("a");
}
catch
{
    i = int.Parse("b");
}
finally
{
   Console.Write(i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
but i have try-block,catch-block,finally-block –  Andreas Niedermair May 24 '12 at 7:16
    
@AndreasNiedermair I added quotes for Try-Catch-Finally. –  Ral Zarek May 24 '12 at 7:28
    
ah, those f*ckin gotos :) –  Andreas Niedermair May 24 '12 at 7:28
    
btw, the example is misleading! the spec states: "try-finally statement enclosing a try-catch statement" ... but yes - now it is clear ... finally is just out of phase/scope ... thanks! –  Andreas Niedermair May 24 '12 at 7:31
    
@AndreasNiedermair I just added an example of my own that hpefully shows the problem –  Ral Zarek May 24 '12 at 8:16
show 1 more comment

You will have to change the first line to string foo = null or initialize as needed. As far as the compiler is concerned, there might be an exception before the foo is intialized in try block and the catch may not happen as well.

share|improve this answer
    
oh ... c'mon ... the compiler is so damn smart with other issues... –  Andreas Niedermair May 24 '12 at 7:07
    
The important part being the lack of guarantee on the catch, if the complier cannot guarantee it opts for the safe path - error or warning. –  Adam Houldsworth May 24 '12 at 7:08
1  
Is there really a case where an exception is thrown, the catch block isn't executed, but the finally block is? –  KooKiz May 24 '12 at 7:11
1  
is maybe finally ignoring both the try and catch blocks, since it doesn't know how much of either might have executed? I don't see any reason why the finally should complain if the second Console.WriteLine call doesn't. any scenario where foo is uninitialized in the finally block, it will be uninitialized after it as well. –  Sahuagin May 24 '12 at 7:20
1  
@AdamHouldsworth which it isn't. the point is either both should complain or neither should (in the code example given). –  Sahuagin May 24 '12 at 7:25
show 8 more comments

I think the problem probably is that there is the case where both the try and catch throw exceptions. In that case, the finally should still be reached, but with an uninitialized foo. Since in that case, the rest of the code will not be reached (the exception that was thrown in the catch block takes us out of the method after the finally), this does not present a problem for the code after the finally. That code can only be reached if either the try or catch blocks ran.

Since there is always the case that every single assignment to foo threw an exception, and since in that case the finally block will always run anyway, there is always the possibility of foo being uninitialized.

As far as I can tell, the only way around this is to provide an initialization value for foo.

share|improve this answer
    
i agree. but: (i believe that) the compiler would get that :) ... the real issue here is "finally is out of scope" –  Andreas Niedermair May 24 '12 at 7:41
add comment

Declare your string foo at class level it will solve the problem

EDIT : or

string foo = "default";
try
{
    foo = "test"; 
}
catch (Exception) 
{
    foo = null;
}
finally
{
    Console.WriteLine(foo); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
-, this is not thread-safe without extra locking –  Andreas Niedermair May 24 '12 at 7:22
    
@AndreasNiedermair then initialize string foo before try catch –  Darshana May 24 '12 at 7:26
    
then adapt your answer. –  Andreas Niedermair May 24 '12 at 7:29
add comment

try

string foo = string.Empty;
share|improve this answer
    
I've asked for the 'why' not 'how can i solve this'... –  Andreas Niedermair Nov 8 '12 at 8:36
add comment

Try this one:

string foo = null;
try
{
    foo = "test"; // yeah, i know ...
}
catch // yeah, i know this one too :)
{
}
finally
{
    Console.WriteLine(foo); // argh ... @#!
}
Console.WriteLine(foo); // but nothing to complain about here
share|improve this answer
    
I've asked for the 'why' not 'how can i solve this'... –  Andreas Niedermair Nov 8 '12 at 8:36
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.