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I am trying to clean up the way my anchors work. I have a header that is fixed to the top of the page, so when you link to an anchor elsewhere in the page, the page jumps so the anchor is at the top of the page, leaving the content behind the fixed header (I hope that makes sense). I need a way to offset the anchor by the 25px from the height of the header. I would prefer HTML or CSS, but Javascript would be acceptable as well.

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The wrapper div shown in stackoverflow.com/questions/1431639/… is fine I think, not too aggressive. –  ron Apr 20 '12 at 14:23
5  
There is a nice article on this subject: css-tricks.com/hash-tag-links-padding –  J. Bruni Oct 6 '13 at 1:44
    

29 Answers 29

You could just use CSS without any javascript.

Give your anchor a class:

<a class="anchor" id="top"></a>

You can then position the anchor an offset higher or lower than where it actually appears on the page, by making it a block element and relatively positioning it. -250px will position the anchor up 250px

a.anchor{display: block; position: relative; top: -250px; visibility: hidden;}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is the better answer, because it doesn't depend on a parent element whose position is set to relative. Thanks for posting this. –  Konklone May 27 '13 at 2:04
1  
I would advise others to use this instead of the span tag. If you're going to add markup, might as well just make it a traditional anchor tag. –  Azmisov Jun 21 '13 at 3:41
25  
Love your solution! It seems not to work with IE7. Anyway, I plan to ignore IE7 users from now on... –  user334639 Sep 19 '13 at 15:35
18  
If you want this to work for visible elements, you can also use a pseudo-element, a la .thing-with-anchor:before { content: ''; display: block; position: relative; width: 0; height: 5em; margin-top: -5em } The display block and position relative are essential. –  harpo May 3 '14 at 15:22
3  
We are not suppose to be using a tags w/o an href attribute anymore. Instead we are suppose to use id tags within heading / section / etc for anchored text. What is the solution then? –  Alice Wonder Nov 18 '14 at 4:08

I found this solution:

<a name="myanchor">
    <h1 style="padding-top: 40px; margin-top: -40px;">My anchor</h1>
</a>

This doesn't create any gap in the content and anchor links works really nice.

share|improve this answer
3  
Worked great. I created a special CSS anchor class and just attached it to my anchors: <a class="anchor" name="foo"></a>. Thanks. –  Willie Wheeler Sep 12 '12 at 20:00
1  
there is still jankiness with the indicator in the nav. so if you scroll down the page, the active nav item doesn't switch until you scroll past the anchor target. –  the0ther Feb 13 '13 at 18:04
8  
Element just above <h1> will not be clickable, because of the hidden padding/margin. I ended up using Ian Clack's jQuery solution, which works great. –  Mathijs Aug 14 '13 at 19:46
1  
How would you make it work with anchors that use element IDs, i.e. <h1 id="smth">Text</h1>...<a href="#smth">Link</a>? –  Alek Davis Nov 7 '13 at 7:06
4  
I think I figured this out: h2[id], h3[id], h4[id], a[name] { padding-top: XXpx; padding-bottom: XXpx; } It applies to all h2, h3, h4 tags with IDs, as well as named anchors. –  Alek Davis Nov 7 '13 at 8:41

I was looking for a solution to this as well. In my case it was pretty easy.

I have a list menu with all the links:

<ul>
<li><a href="#one">one</a></li>
<li><a href="#two">two</a></li>
<li><a href="#three">three</a></li>
<li><a href="#four">four</a></li>
</ul>

And below that the headings where it should go to.

<h3>one</h3>
<p>text here</p>

<h3>two</h3>
<p>text here</p>

<h3>three</h3>
<p>text here</p>

<h3>four</h3>
<p>text here</p>

Now because I have a fixed menu at the top of my page I can't just make it go to my tag because that would be behind the menu.

Instead I put a span tag inside my tag with the proper id.

<h3><span id="one"></span>one</h3>

Now use 2 lines of css to position them properly.

h3{ position:relative; }
h3 span{ position:absolute; top:-200px;}

Change the top value to match the height of your fixed header (or more). Now I assume this would work with other elements as well.

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This should get the checkmark for sure. –  Patrik Alienus Dec 26 '13 at 12:51

Pure css solution inspired by Alexander Savin:

a[name] {
  padding-top: 40px;
  margin-top: -40px;
  display: inline-block; /* required for webkit browsers */
}

Optionally you may want to add the following if the target is still off the screen:

  vertical-align: top;
share|improve this answer
3  
I have just tried on Chrome and the display inline-block was not required. –  Asrail Apr 8 '13 at 6:07
1  
@Asrail For me it didn't work without it –  Hameno Jul 7 '13 at 9:56
1  
For me, "display: inline-block;" completely broke functionality in Chrome (all links became unclickable). –  Alek Davis Nov 7 '13 at 8:43
2  
a[name] selector should not be affected to links –  Ziav Nov 9 '13 at 6:06
    
FYI: merged from stackoverflow.com/questions/9047703/… –  Shog9 Jul 24 '14 at 19:16

The problem with pure CSS solutions is that they neither work with IE7 (which my project needed to support at the time), nor do they work very well when it comes to selecting the content around the anchors. For this reason, I designed a jQuery solution. In general this solution could still arguably be easier than having to add classes to all links with an anchor so I think it's still useful.

We first create a method which checks to see if a given URL is an anchor, and if that anchor is on the page. If it is, we scroll to it's correct position. When any anchors on the page are clicked, we check them, and we also check the anchor on page load. See solution (Original JSFiddle).

/**
  * Check an href for an anchor. If exists, and in document, scroll to it.
  * If href argument omitted, assumes context (this) is HTML Element,
  * which will be the case when invoked by jQuery after an event
  */
function scroll_if_anchor(href) {
    href = typeof(href) == "string" ? href : $(this).attr("href");

    // If href missing, ignore
    if(!href) return;

    // You could easily calculate this dynamically if you prefer
    var fromTop = 50;

    // If our Href points to a valid, non-empty anchor, and is on the same page (e.g. #foo)
    // Legacy jQuery and IE7 may have issues: http://stackoverflow.com/q/1593174
    var $target = $(href);

    // Older browsers without pushState might flicker here, as they momentarily
    // jump to the wrong position (IE < 10)
    if($target.length) {
        $('html, body').animate({ scrollTop: $target.offset().top - fromTop });
        if(history && "pushState" in history) {
            history.pushState({}, document.title, window.location.pathname + href);
            return false;
        }
    }
}    

// When our page loads, check to see if it contains and anchor
scroll_if_anchor(window.location.hash);

// Intercept all anchor clicks
$("body").on("click", "a[href^='#']", scroll_if_anchor);
share|improve this answer
3  
works great, though for jquery 1.7+, use $("a").on("click",... instead of $("a").live("click",... –  JasonS Aug 3 '13 at 9:01
    
Nice comment, I'll update :) - BTW it should also be $("body").on("click", "a"... as it may need to work for anchors which are added into the document by scripts (hence why I was using .live) –  Ian Clark Aug 3 '13 at 10:15
    
+1: in pure CSS soln, elements above aren't clickable (eg, when a side navbar moves on top for small screens) –  tom10 Dec 10 '13 at 2:19
    
Also, though, it's worth noting that this will mess with other href/id pairs, as in collapse, carousel, etc... is there an easy way around this? –  tom10 Dec 10 '13 at 3:35
1  
@tom10 I've added a few conditions to the test for # in the href in order to avoid breaking collapse and carousel: if(href.indexOf("#") == 0 && (!$(this).data() || this.self == window)) –  raddevon Feb 12 '14 at 15:53

FWIW this worked for me:

*[id]:before { 
  display: block; 
  content: " "; 
  margin-top: -75px; 
  height: 75px; 
  visibility: hidden; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
FYI: merged from stackoverflow.com/questions/9047703/… –  Shog9 Jul 24 '14 at 19:17
    
You da man! Great solution. –  Ryan Walton Aug 19 '14 at 17:22

You can do it without js and without altering html. It´s css-only.

a[id]:before {
    content:"";
    display:block;
    height:50px;
    margin:-30px 0 0;
}

That will append a pseudo-element before every a-tag with an id. Adjust values to match the height of your header.

share|improve this answer
2  
Interesting idea, but note that this screws up the display if you happen to have visible links with id's. –  harpo Oct 29 '13 at 2:02
    
If you have ever wonder why it doesn't work for you, check out if parent element has not border or padding. –  byashimov May 20 at 11:36

I had been facing a similar issue, unfortunately after implementing all the solutions above, I came to the following conclusion.

  1. My inner elements had a fragile CSS structure and implementing a position relative / absolute play, was completely breaking the page design.
  2. CSS is not my strong suit.

I wrote this simple scrolling js, that accounts for the offset caused due to the header and relocated the div about 125 pixels below. Please use it as you see fit.

The HTML

<div id="#anchor"></div> <!-- #anchor here is the anchor tag which is on your URL -->

The JavaScript

 $(function() {
  $('a[href*=#]:not([href=#])').click(function() {
    if (location.pathname.replace(/^\//,'') == this.pathname.replace(/^\//,'') 
&& location.hostname == this.hostname) {

      var target = $(this.hash);
      target = target.length ? target : $('[name=' + this.hash.slice(1) +']');
      if (target.length) {
        $('html,body').animate({
          scrollTop: target.offset().top - 125 //offsets for fixed header
        }, 1000);
        return false;
      }
    }
  });
  //Executed on page load with URL containing an anchor tag.
  if($(location.href.split("#")[1])) {
      var target = $('#'+location.href.split("#")[1]);
      if (target.length) {
        $('html,body').animate({
          scrollTop: target.offset().top - 125 //offset height of header here too.
        }, 1000);
        return false;
      }
    }
});

See a live implementation here.

share|improve this answer
2  
This is a nice solution and is working well for me. –  JRTurner1234 Jan 27 '14 at 11:32
1  
Very, very grateful. Nice and smooth. –  Christina Sep 4 '14 at 17:36
    
ok i got the anchor to put the anchor name into the url, but i cant seem to get the second part to work. When i open my page with an anchor in the url, it moves to where the anchor is but it won't offset it. Do i need something in addition to jquery to make that work? –  Robbiegod Sep 10 '14 at 19:06
    
@Robbiegod to offset just tweak the pixel count I have mentioned, scrollTop: target.offset().top - 125 the 125 here is something that worked for me. Refine it as per your needs. It would be great if you could post an example with your problem for more clarifications. –  Shouvik Sep 11 '14 at 7:06
    
@Shouvik I did change 125 to 165 to match my site already, but it still doesnt offset. I have the js code in a file called site.js at that file loads in the footer, could that be the problem? Does this need to load in the head section? I also copied your code straight into my site.js file. The total change i made was changing the $ to jQuery. –  Robbiegod Sep 11 '14 at 14:46

For modern browsers, just add the CSS3 :target selector to the page. This will apply to all the anchors automatically.

:target {
    display: block;    
    position: relative;     
    top: -100px;
    visibility: hidden;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
You could even do :target:before to create a hidden pseudo-element rather than hide the whole target. –  Tavian Barnes Mar 24 '14 at 23:08
    
The :target selector is supposed to be supported since IE9, but the offset only works with FF and Chrome and Safari on my site, not with IE 11. –  cdonner May 27 '14 at 14:00
    
I guess you could argue that IE is not a modern browser. Either way, by using a CSS class instead of the :target selector it works fine in IE as well. –  cdonner May 27 '14 at 14:19
    
When you do things the HTML5 way (and I think 4 too) where you target an id attribute within a node such as section or header, this way caused the element to display overlapping elements above it. –  Alice Wonder Nov 21 '14 at 0:40
1  
Hiding :target seems like a bad idea in most contexts. You're granting anybody who sends someone a link to your page the power to pick any element with an ID and delete it from the page that the viewer will see. On the tame side, tech-savvy pranksters may well notice this and decide to have some fun with it, much as they once had fun with the ability to make links to some news sites show up with silly titles on Facebook by manipulating their URLs. More severely, it may be a security hole if your page has something like a "don't share this secret information with anyone" message with an ID. –  Mark Amery Mar 7 at 21:22

Solutions with changing position property are not always possible (it can destroy layout) therefore I suggest this:

HTML:

<a id="top">Anchor</a>

CSS:

#top {
    margin-top: -250px;
    padding-top: 250px;
}

Use this:

<a id="top">&nbsp;</a>

to minimize overlapping, and set font-size to 1px. Empty anchor will not work in some browsers.

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As @moeffju suggests, this can be achieved with CSS. The issue I ran into (which I'm surprised I haven't seen discussed) is the trick of overlapping previous elements with padding or a transparent border prevents hover and click actions at the bottom of those sections because the following one comes higher in the z-order.

The best fix I found was to place section content in a div that is at z-index: 1:

// Apply to elements that serve as anchors
.offset-anchor {
  border-top: 75px solid transparent;
  margin: -75px 0 0;
  -webkit-background-clip: padding-box;
  -moz-background-clip: padding;
  background-clip: padding-box;
}

// Because offset-anchor causes sections to overlap the bottom of previous ones,
// we need to put content higher so links aren't blocked by the transparent border.
.container {
  position: relative;
  z-index: 1;
}
share|improve this answer

My solution combines the target and before selectors for our CMS. Other techniques don't account for text in the anchor. Adjust the height and the negative margin to the offset you need...

:target:before {
    content: "";
    display: inline-block;
    height: 180px;
    margin: -180px 0 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
These two CSS solutions didn't work for me on the first sight, but finally I found out it might not be compatible with other CSS properties. Added a wrapper and that fixed the problem. Combination of :target:before with display:block works best for me. –  John Dec 23 '14 at 13:49

Borrowing some of the code from an answer given at this link (no author is specified), you can include a nice smooth-scroll effect to the anchor, while making it stop at -60px above the anchor, fitting nicely underneath the fixed bootstrap navigation bar (requires jQuery):

$(".dropdown-menu a[href^='#']").on('click', function(e) {
   // prevent default anchor click behavior
   e.preventDefault();

   // animate
   $('html, body').animate({
       scrollTop: $(this.hash).offset().top - 60
     }, 300, function(){
     });
});
share|improve this answer
    
FYI: merged from stackoverflow.com/questions/9047703/… –  Shog9 Jul 24 '14 at 19:17
    
A full solution should also include the scenario in which a user loads a new page with the anchor already in the address bar. I tried to adapt this code to fire upon the $(document).ready event but it is still scrolling to the wrong place in the document. Any ideas? –  Adam Friedman Aug 21 '14 at 22:46

For the same issue, I used an easy solution : put a padding-top of 40px on each anchor.

share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks, this was basically what I ended up doing, but I was wondering whether there's a solution for situations where adding extra padding might be awkward. –  Ben Feb 29 '12 at 22:57
    
FYI: merged from stackoverflow.com/questions/9047703/… –  Shog9 Jul 24 '14 at 19:17

I ran into this same issue and ended up handling the click events manually, like:

$('#mynav a').click(() ->
  $('html, body').animate({
      scrollTop: $($(this).attr('href')).offset().top - 40
  }, 200
  return false
)

Scroll animation optional, of course.

share|improve this answer
    
FYI: merged from stackoverflow.com/questions/9047703/… –  Shog9 Jul 24 '14 at 19:18

The above methods don't work very well if your anchor is a table element or within a table (row or cell).

I had to use javascript and bind to the window hashchange event to work around this (demo):

function moveUnderNav() {
    var $el, h = window.location.hash;
    if (h) {
        $el = $(h);
        if ($el.length && $el.closest('table').length) {
            $('body').scrollTop( $el.closest('table, tr').position().top - 26 );
        }
    }
}

$(window)
    .load(function () {
        moveUnderNav();
    })
    .on('hashchange', function () {
        moveUnderNav();
    });

* Note: The hashchange event is not available in all browsers.

share|improve this answer

This takes many elements from previous answers and combines into a tiny (194 bytes minified) anonymous jQuery function. Adjust fixedElementHeight for the height of your menu or blocking element.

    (function($, window) {
        var adjustAnchor = function() {

            var $anchor = $(':target'),
                    fixedElementHeight = 100;

            if ($anchor.length > 0) {

                $('html, body')
                    .stop()
                    .animate({
                        scrollTop: $anchor.offset().top - fixedElementHeight
                    }, 200);

            }

        };

        $(window).on('hashchange load', function() {
            adjustAnchor();
        });

    })(jQuery, window);

If you don't like the animation, replace

$('html, body')
     .stop()
     .animate({
         scrollTop: $anchor.offset().top - fixedElementHeight
     }, 200);

with:

window.scrollTo(0, $anchor.offset().top - fixedElementHeight);

Uglified version:

 !function(o,n){var t=function(){var n=o(":target"),t=100;n.length>0&&o("html, body").stop().animate({scrollTop:n.offset().top-t},200)};o(n).on("hashchange load",function(){t()})}(jQuery,window);
share|improve this answer
    
This solution really helped me out, but it is somehow not working consistently in IE9-11. Sometimes it works, some other clicks it doesn't (scroll position stays at the anchor position). I am totally out of ideas what could cause the issue. –  Crono1985 May 20 at 15:20

I'm facing this problem in a TYPO3 website, where all "Content Elements" are wrapped with something like:

<div id="c1234" class="contentElement">...</div>

and i changed the rendering so it renders like this:

<div id="c1234" class="anchor"></div>
<div class="contentElement">...</div>

And this CSS:

.anchor{
    position: relative;
    top: -50px;
}

The fixed topbar being 40px high, now the anchors work again and start 10px under the topbar.

Only drawback of this technique is you can no longer use :target.

share|improve this answer
2  
Actually you can use :target like so: .anchor:target+div –  lipsumar Apr 24 '13 at 17:13

I added 40px-height .vspace element holding the anchor before each of my h1 elements.

<div class="vspace" id="gherkin"></div>
<div class="page-header">
  <h1>Gherkin</h1>
</div>

In the CSS:

.vspace { height: 40px;}

It's working great and the space is not chocking.

share|improve this answer
    
FYI: merged from stackoverflow.com/questions/9047703/… –  Shog9 Jul 24 '14 at 19:17

how about hidden span tags with linkable IDs that provide the height of the navbar:

#head1 {
  padding-top: 60px;
  height: 0px;
  visibility: hidden;
}


<span class="head1">somecontent</span>
<h5 id="headline1">This Headline is not obscured</h5>

heres the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/N6f2f/7

share|improve this answer
    
FYI: merged from stackoverflow.com/questions/9047703/… –  Shog9 Jul 24 '14 at 19:17

You can also add an anchor with follow attr:

(text-indent:-99999px;)
visibility: hidden;
position:absolute;
top:-80px;    

and give the parent container a position relative.

Works perfect for me.

share|improve this answer
    
FYI: merged from stackoverflow.com/questions/9047703/… –  Shog9 Jul 24 '14 at 19:17

You can achieve this without an ID using the a[name]:not([href]) css selector. This simply looks for links with a name and no href e.g. <a name="anc1"></a>

An example rule might be:

a[name]:not([href]){
    display: block;    
    position: relative;     
    top: -100px;
    visibility: hidden;
}
share|improve this answer

A further twist to the excellent answer from @Jan is to incorporate this into the #uberbar fixed header, which uses jQuery (or MooTools). (http://davidwalsh.name/persistent-header-opacity)

I've tweaked the code so the the top of the content is always below not under the fixed header and also added the anchors from @Jan again making sure that the anchors are always positioned below the fixed header.

The CSS:

#uberbar { 
    border-bottom:1px solid #0000cc; 
    position:fixed; 
    top:0; 
    left:0; 
    z-index:2000; 
    width:100%;
}

a.anchor {
    display: block;
    position: relative;
    visibility: hidden;
}

The jQuery (including tweaks to both the #uberbar and the anchor approaches:

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {
    (function() {
        //settings
        var fadeSpeed = 200, fadeTo = 0.85, topDistance = 30;
        var topbarME = function() { $('#uberbar').fadeTo(fadeSpeed,1); }, topbarML = function() { $('#uberbar').fadeTo(fadeSpeed,fadeTo); };
        var inside = false;
        //do
        $(window).scroll(function() {
            position = $(window).scrollTop();
            if(position > topDistance && !inside) {
                //add events
                topbarML();
                $('#uberbar').bind('mouseenter',topbarME);
                $('#uberbar').bind('mouseleave',topbarML);
                inside = true;
            }
            else if (position < topDistance){
                topbarME();
                $('#uberbar').unbind('mouseenter',topbarME);
                $('#uberbar').unbind('mouseleave',topbarML);
                inside = false;
            }
        });
        $('#content').css({'margin-top': $('#uberbar').outerHeight(true)});
        $('a.anchor').css({'top': - $('#uberbar').outerHeight(true)});
    })();
});
</script>

And finally the HTML:

<div id="uberbar">
    <!--CONTENT OF FIXED HEADER-->
</div>
....
<div id="content">
    <!--MAIN CONTENT-->
    ....
    <a class="anchor" id="anchor1"></a>
    ....
    <a class="anchor" id="anchor2"></a>
    ....
</div>

Maybe this is useful to somebody who likes the #uberbar fading dixed header!

share|improve this answer

This was inspired by the answer by Shouvik - same concept as his, only the size of the fixed header isn't hard coded. As long as your fixed header is in the first header node, this should "just work"

/*jslint browser: true, plusplus: true, regexp: true */

function anchorScroll(fragment) {
    "use strict";
    var amount, ttarget;
    amount = $('header').height();
    ttarget = $('#' + fragment);
    $('html,body').animate({ scrollTop: ttarget.offset().top - amount }, 250);
    return false;
}

function outsideToHash() {
    "use strict";
    var fragment;
    if (window.location.hash) {
        fragment = window.location.hash.substring(1);
        anchorScroll(fragment);
    }
}

function insideToHash(nnode) {
    "use strict";
    var fragment;
    fragment = $(nnode).attr('href').substring(1);
    anchorScroll(fragment);
}

$(document).ready(function () {
    "use strict";
    $("a[href^='#']").bind('click',  function () {insideToHash(this); });
    outsideToHash();
});
share|improve this answer
    
Oh - also this solution assumes the id attribute is used for the anchor, not the deprecated name attribute. –  Alice Wonder Nov 21 '14 at 2:37

Here's the solution that we use on our site. Adjust the headerHeight variable to whatever your header height is. Add the js-scroll class to the anchor that should scroll on click.

// SCROLL ON CLICK
// --------------------------------------------------------------------------
$('.js-scroll').click(function(){
    var headerHeight = 60;

    $('html, body').animate({
        scrollTop: $( $.attr(this, 'href') ).offset().top - headerHeight
    }, 500);
    return false;
});
share|improve this answer

Instead of having a fixed-position navbar which is underlapped by the rest of the content of the page (with the whole page body being scrollable), consider instead having a non-scrollable body with a static navbar and then having the page content in an absolutely-positioned scrollable div below.

That is, have HTML like this...

<div class="static-navbar">NAVBAR</div>
<div class="scrollable-content">
  <p>Bla bla bla</p>
  <p>Yadda yadda yadda</p>
  <p>Mary had a little lamb</p>
  <h2 id="stuff-i-want-to-link-to">Stuff</h2>
  <p>More nonsense</p>
</div>

... and CSS like this:

.static-navbar {
  height: 100px;
}
.scrollable-content {
  position: absolute;
  top: 100px;
  bottom: 0;
  overflow-y: scroll;
  width: 100%;
}

This achieves the desired result in a straightforward, non-hacky way. The only difference in behaviour between this and some of the clever CSS hacks suggested above are that the scrollbar (in browsers that render one) will be attached to the content div rather than the whole height of the page. You may or may not consider this desirable.

Here's a JSFiddle demonstrating this in action.

share|improve this answer

@AlexanderSavin's solution works great in WebKit browsers for me.

I additionally had to use :target pseudo-class which applies style to the selected anchor to adjust padding in FF, Opera & IE9:

a:target {
  padding-top: 40px
}

Note that this style is not for Chrome / Safari so you'll probably have to use css-hacks, conditional comments etc.

Also I'd like to notice that Alexander's solution works due to the fact that targeted element is inline. If you don't want link you could simply change display property:

<div id="myanchor" style="display: inline">
   <h1 style="padding-top: 40px; margin-top: -40px;">My anchor</h1>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
my nav items link to h2 elements, which are all display: block. i am using chrome, and i did not need to set the h2's to inline or inline-block. –  the0ther Feb 13 '13 at 17:50
    
@the0ther I was referring to wrapper element not headers. Also experiencing difficulties to imagine your markup based on your words. –  jibiel Feb 13 '13 at 19:31
    
FYI: merged from stackoverflow.com/questions/9047703/… –  Shog9 Jul 24 '14 at 19:17

Adding to Ziav's answer (with thanks to Alexander Savin), I need to be using the old-school <a name="...">...</a> as we're using <div id="...">...</div> for another purpose in our code. I had some display issues using display: inline-block -- the first line of every <p> element was turning out to be slightly right-indented (on both Webkit and Firefox browsers). I ended up trying other display values and display: table-caption works perfectly for me.

.anchor {
  padding-top: 60px;
  margin-top: -60px;
  display: table-caption;
}
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FYI: merged from stackoverflow.com/questions/9047703/… –  Shog9 Jul 24 '14 at 19:17

My solution was more on the simple side: .anchorSpacer {height:25px;}

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add some more info and code to your solution please –  Ruben Nov 7 '14 at 10:09

protected by Community Feb 6 at 4:32

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