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I am writing a code to generate permutation of elements of an array. I wrote two different types of swaping functions one using temporary storage works fine while the other that doesn't use any temporary storage is not generating output. Why this is happening??

The following code works fine

#include<iostream>
#include<cstdio>
using namespace std;
int tt=0;
void swap1 (int v[], int i, int j) {
    int t;

    t = v[i];
    v[i] = v[j];
    v[j] = t;
}   
void permute(int arr[],int n,int index)
{
     if(index==n)
                {
                for(int i=0;i<n;i++) printf ("%c", arr[i]) ;
                printf("\n");
                tt++;
                }
     else
         for(int j=index; j < n ;j++)
         {
           swap1(arr,index,j);
           permute(arr,n,index+1); 
           swap1(arr,j,index);           
         }        
}
int main()
{
    int arr[]={'a','b','c','d'};
    permute(arr,4,0);
    cout<<endl;
    printf("%d\n",tt);
    getchar();
}

output:
acbd
acdb
adcb
adbc
bacd
badc
bcad
bcda
bdca
bdac
cbad
cbda
cabd
cadb
cdab
cdba
dbca
dbac
dcba
dcab
dacb
dabc

24

While the following code doesn't output the permutations:

#include<iostream>
#include<cstdio>
using namespace std;
int tt=0;
void swap(int v[],int i,int j)
{
     v[i]= v[i] + v[j];
     v[j]= v[i] - v[j];
     v[i]= v[i] - v[j];
}
void permute(int arr[],int n,int index)
{
     if(index==n)
                {
                for(int i=0;i<n;i++) printf ("%c", arr[i]) ;
                printf("\n");
                tt++;
                }
     else
         for(int j=index; j < n ;j++)
         {
           swap(arr,index,j);
           permute(arr,n,index+1); 
           swap(arr,j,index);           
         }        
}
int main()
{
    int arr[]={'a','b','c','d'};
    permute(arr,4,0);
    cout<<endl;
    printf("%d\n",tt);
    getchar();
}

output:

























24
share|improve this question
    
Remember too that std::swap() exists and should be used when possible, but your swap() function can have a name-clash because you use using namespace std; – stefaanv May 24 '12 at 7:54
up vote 2 down vote accepted
void swap(int v[],int i,int j)
{
     v[i]= v[i] + v[j];
     v[j]= v[i] - v[j];
     v[i]= v[i] - v[j];
}

doesn't work when i == j (it then set v[i] to 0), something which happens with your loop

for (int j = index; j < n; ++j) {
    swap(arr, index, j);
share|improve this answer
    
just didn't clicked my mind....thanks a lot you saved me lot of time. :) – manyu May 24 '12 at 7:41

Please, for the love of whatever deities you believe in (or otherwise), don't use ugly hacks like your second swap function (or the dreaded XOR-swap trick).

They're totally unnecessary and generally slower than a typical temporary-variable solution. They'll also result in your code making an appearance on sites like The Daily WTF, and generations of programmers (who have to maintain such cruft) will curse your name through the centuries ahead :-)

And, in any case, they won't work if the two elements you're "swapping" are the same one because, the instant you do:

v[i]= v[i] + v[j];

where i and j are the same value, you have lost the information required for the other steps to work.

You can see this in action as follows. Let's say you have two distinct variables, a = 20 and b = 30. Work through your steps:

a = a + b;  // a <- (20 + 30) = 50, b still = 30.
b = a - b;  // b <- (50 - 30) = 20, a still = 50.
a = a - b;  // a <- (50 - 20) = 30, b still = 20.

And they're swapped, though you'd probably want to look into the edge cases with overflow and encoding schemes that aren't two's complement (in C anyway, not sure whether C++ allows ones' complement or sign-magnitude).

But let's see what happens when both a and b are the same variable (not the same value but the actual same variable, like a reference). So they "both" have the value of 20 and you would expect them to still both be 20 after a swap but let's have a look:

a = a + b;  // a <- (20 + 20) = 40, AND b = 40 as well.
b = a - b;  // b <- (40 - 40) =  0, AND a =  0 as well.
a = a - b;  // a <- ( 0 -  0) =  0, AND b =  0 as well.

That's not really the outcome you expected.

share|improve this answer
    
Moreover, depending on the contents of the array, an overflow / underflow may happen during the computation. – swegi May 24 '12 at 7:41
    
+1 for preventing people from using ugly hacks that don't have any benefit since we moved away from using assembly language on 8-bit microprocessors... – Axel May 24 '12 at 7:47
    
@paxdiablo thanks for the suggestion.... – manyu May 24 '12 at 7:48

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