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I am using the MessageBox provided by WPF Toolkit. And I get the error

The calling thread must be STA, because many UI components require this

new Thread(new ThreadStart(delegate
{
    MessageBox.Show("Opeartion could not be completed. Please try again.","Error",MessageBoxButton.OK,MessageBoxImage.Error);
})).Start();

How can I set the ApartmentState in this case

Edit: I am trying to display a modeless MessageBox using MessageBox control of WPF Toolkit. So far the code I have is as follows:

void SomeFunction()
{
// calls to some UI, and processing and then

var th = new Thread(new ThreadStart(delegate
                                        {
                                           MessageBox.Show("Opeartion could not be completed. Please try again.",
                                                "Error", MessageBoxButton.OK, MessageBoxImage.Error);
                                        }));

                                        th.SetApartmentState(ApartmentState.STA);
                                        th.Start();
                                    }
}
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1  
Why do you start a new thread just to show a dialog box? It would be much better to signal your existing UI thread and have that one show it. Would solve your problem automatically too. –  Jon May 24 '12 at 7:29
    
    
@Jon I completely agree, there is absolutely no reason to spin off a new thread to display a message box. Even if it were a dialog which does something that could lock that thread, I still wouldn't suggest a new thread -- I'd suggest using the Dispatcher. –  Erode May 24 '12 at 20:16
    
The reason I want to start a new thread is because, the messagebox should be modeless. –  xaria May 25 '12 at 8:43
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2 Answers 2

Like the frames of the user interface, like many Windows Forms, WPF also imposes a single threading model, which means you can only access a specified derivative DispatcherObject thread that creates it. In Windows Forms controls that implement the interface ISynchronizeInvoke, this interface exposes a set of methods such as Invoke and BeginInvoke to impose a contract common thread synchronization we can use to access a control from another thread. In WPF, we also have that kind of thing, but these operations are involved in a class called Dispatcher, Dispatcher WPF is the way to allow this kind of thread synchronization model.

The following is an example of how to modify the TextBox.Text property when the caller is in a different thread:

// Resets textbox text from another thread
textBox.Dispatcher.Invoke(DispatcherPriority.Background, new Action(() =>
{
    textBox.Text = "New text";
}));
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EDITED

According to MSDN There exists builtin modal MessageBox in WPF but if you want to use Modeless MessageBox then you have to create custom window and then show it. Creating, showing and and returning value from custom modeless MessageBox is not very tough. You can see this link

It is not wiser to use different thread for messagebox only. Anyway you can set single apartment state by following...

  Thread th = new Thread(new ThreadStart(delegate
  {
    MessageBox.Show("Opeartion could not be completed. Please try again.", "Error",MessageBoxButtons.OK,MessageBoxImage.Error);
  }));

  th.ApartmentState = ApartmentState.STA;
  th.Start();
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Remember you can only set ApartmentState once for every thread. I would set it by setting: [STAThread] public static void Main() –  CodingBarfield May 24 '12 at 7:41
    
@CodingBarfield : And how would that make his new thread to be in STA? –  Grzegorz W May 24 '12 at 7:47
    
The documentation says that the ApartmentState must be set before threadStart. SO that means I cannot use anonymous function? –  xaria May 24 '12 at 7:56
    
@xaria before start you can set the apartment state. check edited answer –  Md Kamruzzaman Pallob May 24 '12 at 8:08
    
I still get the error: An unhandled exception of type 'System.InvalidOperationException' occurred in WindowsBase.dll Additional information: The calling thread cannot access this object because a different thread owns it. –  xaria May 25 '12 at 9:01
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