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I have a line from A to B and a circle positioned at C with the radius R.

Image

What is a good algorithm to use to check whether the line intersects the circle? And at what coordinate along the circles edge it occurred?

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4  
Hmm. One question: are you talking about the infinite line through A and B, or the finite line segment from A to B? –  Jason S Jul 2 '09 at 19:07
    
In this case, its the finite line segment. Is "line" called something else depending on if its finite or infinite? –  Mizipzor Jul 3 '09 at 13:19
1  
Is there a performance requirement ? Should it be a fast method ? –  chmike Jul 7 '09 at 6:32
    
At this point, no, all the algorithms here that Ive tried doesnt slow the application down noticeably. –  Mizipzor Jul 7 '09 at 10:53
    
@Mizipzor yes, they are called something else: line segments. If you just say "line" it's implied an infinite one. –  MestreLion Aug 6 at 7:59

13 Answers 13

up vote 102 down vote accepted

Taking

  1. E is the starting point of the ray,
  2. L is the end point of the ray,
  3. C is the center of sphere you're testing against
  4. r is the radius of that sphere

Compute:
d = L - E ( Direction vector of ray, from start to end )
f = E - C ( Vector from center sphere to ray start )

Then the intersection is found by..
Plugging:
P = E + t * d
This is a parametric equation:
Px = Ex + tdx
Py = Ey + tdy
into
(x - h)2 + (y - k)2 = r2
(h,k) = center of circle.

Note: We've simplified the problem to 2D here, the solution we get applies also in 3D

to get:

  1. Expand
    x2 - 2xh + h2 + y2 - 2yk + k2 - r2 = 0
  2. Plug
    x = ex + tdx
    y = ey + tdy
    ( ex + tdx )2 - 2( ex + tdx )h + h2 + ( ey + tdy )2 - 2( ey + tdy )k + k2 - r2 = 0
  3. Explode
    ex2 + 2extdx + t2dx2 - 2exh - 2tdxh + h2 + ey2 + 2eytdy + t2dy2 - 2eyk - 2tdyk + k2 - r2 = 0
  4. Group
    t2( dx2 + dy2 ) + 2t( exdx + eydy - dxh - dyk ) + ex2 + ey2 - 2exh - 2eyk + h2 + k2 - r2 = 0
  5. Finally,
    t2( _d * _d ) + 2t( _e * _d - _d * _c ) + _e * _e - 2( _e*_c ) + _c * _c - r2 = 0
    *Where _d is the vector d and * is the dot product.*
  6. And then,
    t2( _d * _d ) + 2t( _d * ( _e - _c ) ) + ( _e - _c ) * ( _e - _c ) - r2 = 0
  7. Letting _f = _e - _c
    t2( _d * _d ) + 2t( _d * _f ) + _f * _f - r2 = 0

So we get:
t2 * (d DOT d) + 2t*( f DOT d ) + ( f DOT f - r2 ) = 0
So solving the quadratic equation:

float a = d.Dot( d ) ;
float b = 2*f.Dot( d ) ;
float c = f.Dot( f ) - r*r ;

float discriminant = b*b-4*a*c;
if( discriminant < 0 )
{
  // no intersection
}
else
{
  // ray didn't totally miss sphere,
  // so there is a solution to
  // the equation.

  discriminant = sqrt( discriminant );

  // either solution may be on or off the ray so need to test both
  // t1 is always the smaller value, because BOTH discriminant and
  // a are nonnegative.
  float t1 = (-b - discriminant)/(2*a);
  float t2 = (-b + discriminant)/(2*a);

  // 3x HIT cases:
  //          -o->             --|-->  |            |  --|->
  // Impale(t1 hit,t2 hit), Poke(t1 hit,t2>1), ExitWound(t1<0, t2 hit), 

  // 3x MISS cases:
  //       ->  o                     o ->              | -> |
  // FallShort (t1>1,t2>1), Past (t1<0,t2<0), CompletelyInside(t1<0, t2>1)

  if( t1 >= 0 && t1 <= 1 )
  {
    // t1 is the intersection, and it's closer than t2
    // (since t1 uses -b - discriminant)
    // Impale, Poke
    return true ;
  }

  // here t1 didn't intersect so we are either started
  // inside the sphere or completely past it
  if( t2 >= 0 && t2 <= 1 )
  {
    // ExitWound
    return true ;
  }

  // no intn: FallShort, Past, CompletelyInside
  return false ;
}
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1  
Seems to work if I do straight copy and paste, but Im looking to understand it to. In (x-h)^2+(y-k)^2=r^2 what is h and k? Is k to constant by which the line/ray increases on y over x? And what is t? Looking at the code it seems you have assumed its 1 (so its just "removed"). Do these formulas have a name or something? Maybe I can look them up in detail on Wolfram. –  Mizipzor Jul 6 '09 at 12:17
3  
h and k are the center of the circle that you're intersecting against. t is the parameter of the line equation. In the code, t1 and t2 are the solutions. t1 and t2 tell you "how far along the ray" the intersection happened. –  bobobobo Jul 6 '09 at 13:22
1  
Ok, got it. The dot product is simply computed over the three elements (x,y,z) vectors. I will switch my code to this algorithm. –  chmike Jul 10 '09 at 6:23
1  
nice explanation @bobobobo +1 –  Sameer Feb 22 '12 at 7:46
1  
Not sure why, but the code doesn't seem to work for the Impale case. It does when I add if t1 <= 0 && t1 >= -1 && t2 <= 0 && t2 >= -1 as true condition, but then it also gives a false positive on one side of the finite line, when the circle is on the "infinite" part. I don't understand the math yet, but copy/pasters, beware. –  Nicolas Mommaerts Apr 3 '13 at 22:54

No one seems to consider projection, am I completely off track here?

Project the vector AC onto AB. The projected vector, AD, gives the new point D.
If the distance between D and C is smaller than (or equal to) R we have an intersection.

Like this:
Image by SchoolBoy

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2  
I was writing my answer based on that just as you posted this answer :) You are correct, this is a good way to check whether intersection exists. –  Juozas Kontvainis Jul 3 '09 at 14:01
1  
There are many details to take into consideration: does D lie between AB? Is C perpendicular distance to the line larger than the radius? All of these involve magnitude of vector, i.e. square root. –  ADB Sep 1 '10 at 14:42
8  
Good idea, but how do you then compute the two intersection points? –  Ben Feb 29 '12 at 15:39

Okay, I won't give you code, but since you have tagged this , I don't think that will matter to you. First, you have to get a vector perpendicular to the line.

You will have an unknown variable in y = ax + c ( c will be unknown )
To solve for that, Calculate it's value when the line passes through the center of the circle.

That is,
Plug in the location of the circle center to the line equation and solve for c.
Then calculate the intersection point of the original line and its normal.

This will give you the closest point on the line to the circle.
Calculate the distance between this point and the circle center (using the magnitude of the vector).
If this is less than the radius of the circle - voila, we have an intersection!

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2  
That was, in fact, what I wanted. I want the theory, a google search of line-circle collision algorithm turns up only code as far as I can see. –  Mizipzor Jul 2 '09 at 9:25
    
cool, glad to be of help –  a_m0d Jul 2 '09 at 9:27
1  
Oh, sorry - I am using the simple equation of a line with a gradient and offset (the cartesian equation). I assumed that you were storing the line as such an equation - in which case you use the negative of the gradient for k. If you don't have the line stored like this, you could calculate k as (y2-y1)/(x2-x1) –  a_m0d Jul 3 '09 at 21:22
1  
We don't assume that m is zero; we calculate the gradient first (so that the equation of the line then looks like y=2x+m as an example), and then once we have the gradient we can solve for m by plugging in the center of the circle for y and x. –  a_m0d Jul 3 '09 at 21:24
1  
+1 Awesome explanation! But I think this assumes a line, not a line segment. So, if the nearest point on this line to the circle's center wasn't between points A and B, it would still be counted. –  Hassan Jun 1 '12 at 22:01

I would use the algorithm to compute the distance between a point (circle center) and a line (line AB). This can then be used to determine the intersection points of the line with the circle.

Let say we have the points A, B, C. Ax and Ay are the x and y components of the A points. Same for B and C. The scalar R is the circle radius.

Here is the algorithm

// compute the euclidean distance between A and B
LAB = sqrt( (Bx-Ax)²+(By-Ay)² )

// compute the direction vector D from A to B
Dx = (Bx-Ax)/LAB
Dy = (By-Ay)/LAB

// Now the line equation is x = Dx*t + Ax, y = Dy*t + Ay with 0 <= t <= 1.

// compute the value t of the closest point to the circle center (Cx, Cy)
t = Dx*(Cx-Ax) + Dy*(Cy-Ay)    

// This is the projection of C on the line from A to B.

// compute the coordinates of the point E on line and closest to C
Ex = t*Dx+Ax
Ey = t*Dy+Ay

// compute the euclidean distance from E to C
LEC = sqrt( (Ex-Cx)²+(Ey-Cy)² )

// test if the line intersects the circle
if( LEC < R )
{
    // compute distance from t to circle intersection point
    dt = sqrt( R² - LEC²)

    // compute first intersection point
    Fx = (t-dt)*Dx + Ax
    Fy = (t-dt)*Dy + Ay

    // compute second intersection point
    Gx = (t+dt)*Dx + Ax
    Gy = (t+dt)*Dy + Ay
}

// else test if the line is tangent to circle
else if( LEC == R )
    // tangent point to circle is E

else
    // line doesn't touch circle
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Another method uses the triangle ABC area formula. The intersection test is simpler and more efficient than the projection method, but finding the coordinates of the intersection point requires more work. At least it will be delayed to the point it is required.

The formula to compute the triangle area is : area = bh/2

where b is the base length and h is the height. We chose the segment AB to be the base so that h is the shortest distance from C, the circle center, to the line.

Since the triangle area can also be computed by a vector dot product we can determine h.

// compute the triangle area times 2 (area = area2/2)
area2 = abs( (Bx-Ax)*(Cy-Ay) - (Cx-Ax)(By-Ay) )

// compute the AB segment length
LAB = sqrt( (Bx-Ax)² + (By-Ay)² )

// compute the triangle height
h = area2/LAB

// if the line intersects the circle
if( h < R )
{
    ...
}        

UPDATE 1 :

You could optimize the code by using the fast inverse square root computation described here to get a good approximation of 1/LAB.

Computing the intersection point is not that difficult. Here it goes

// compute the line AB direction vector components
Dx = (Bx-Ax)/LAB
Dy = (By-Ay)/LAB

// compute the distance from A toward B of closest point to C
t = Dx*(Cx-Ax) + Dy*(Cy-Ay)

// t should be equal to sqrt( (Cx-Ax)² + (Cy-Ay)² - h² )

// compute the intersection point distance from t
dt = sqrt( R² - h² )

// compute first intersection point coordinate
Ex = Ax + (t-dt)*Dx
Ey = Ay + (t-dt)*Dy

// compute second intersection point coordinate
Fx = Ax + (t+dt)*Dx
Fy = Ay + (t+dt)*Dy

If h = R then the line AB is tangent to the circle and the value dt = 0 and E = F. The point coordinates are those of E and F.

You should check that A is different of B and the segment length is not null if this may happen in your application.

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2  
I like the simplicity in this method. Maybe I could adapt some of the surrounding code to not need the actual collision point itself, Ill see what happens if I use A or B rather than the calculated point in between. –  Mizipzor Jul 7 '09 at 11:00
    
t = Dx*(Cx-Ax) + Dy*(Cy-Ax) should read t = Dx*(Cx-Ax) + Dy*(Cy-Ay) –  Stonetip Jun 21 '12 at 15:02
    
This is right. Thank you for pointing it out. I corrected it in the post. –  chmike Jun 22 '12 at 16:17
    
just edited -- first line calculates triangle area using a cross product, not a dot product. verified with code here: stackoverflow.com/questions/2533011/… –  ericsoco Jun 1 '13 at 15:26
    
note also, the first half of this answer tests for intersection with a line, not a line segment (as asked in the question). –  ericsoco Jun 21 '13 at 18:40

You can find a point on a infinite line that is nearest to circle center by projecting vector AC onto vector AB. Calculate the distance between that point and circle center. If it is greater that R, there is no intersection. If the distance is equal to R, line is a tangent of the circle and the point nearest to circle center is actually the intersection point. If distance less that R, then there are 2 intersection points. They lie at the same distance from the point nearest to circle center. That distance can easily be calculated using Pythagorean theorem. Here's algorithm in pseudocode:

{
dX = bX - aX;
dY = bY - aY;
if ((dX == 0) && (dY == 0))
  {
  // A and B are the same points, no way to calculate intersection
  return;
  }

dl = (dX * dX + dY * dY);
t = ((cX - aX) * dX + (cY - aY) * dY) / dl;

// point on a line nearest to circle center
nearestX = aX + t * dX;
nearestY = aY + t * dY;

dist = point_dist(nearestX, nearestY, cX, cY);

if (dist == R)
  {
  // line segment touches circle; one intersection point
  iX = nearestX;
  iY = nearestY;

  if (t < 0 || t > 1)
    {
    // intersection point is not actually within line segment
    }
  }
else if (dist < R)
  {
  // two possible intersection points

  dt = sqrt(R * R - dist * dist) / sqrt(dl);

  // intersection point nearest to A
  t1 = t - dt;
  i1X = aX + t1 * dX;
  i1Y = aY + t1 * dY;
  if (t1 < 0 || t1 > 1)
    {
    // intersection point is not actually within line segment
    }

  // intersection point farthest from A
  t2 = t + dt;
  i2X = aX + t2 * dX;
  i2Y = aY + t2 * dY;
  if (t2 < 0 || t2 > 1)
    {
    // intersection point is not actually within line segment
    }
  }
else
  {
  // no intersection
  }
}

EDIT: added code to check whether found intersection points actually are within line segment.

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You missed one case since we are talking about a line segment: when the segment ends in the circle. –  ADB Sep 1 '10 at 14:47
    
@ADB actually my algorithm only works for infinite lines only, not line segments. There are many cases that it does not handle with line segments. –  Juozas Kontvainis Sep 2 '10 at 6:52

You'll need some math here:

Suppose A = (Xa, Ya), B = (Xb, Yb) and C = (Xc, Yc). Any point on the line from A to B has coordinates (alpha*Xa + (1-alpha)Xb, alphaYa + (1-alpha)*Yb) = P

If the point P has distance R to C, it must be on the circle. What you want is to solve

distance(P, C) = R

that is

(alpha*Xa + (1-alpha)*Xb)^2 + (alpha*Ya + (1-alpha)*Yb)^2 = R^2
alpha^2*Xa^2 + alpha^2*Xb^2 - 2*alpha*Xb^2 + Xb^2 + alpha^2*Ya^2 + alpha^2*Yb^2 - 2*alpha*Yb^2 + Yb^2=R^2
(Xa^2 + Xb^2 + Ya^2 + Yb^2)*alpha^2 - 2*(Xb^2 + Yb^2)*alpha + (Xb^2 + Yb^2 - R^2) = 0

if you apply the ABC-formula to this equation to solve it for alpha, and compute the coordinates of P using the solution(s) for alpha, you get the intersection points, if any exist.

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If you find the distance between the center of the sphere (since it's 3D I assume you mean sphere and not circle) and the line, then check if that distance is less than the radius that will do the trick.

The collision point is obviously the closest point between the line and the sphere (which will be calculated when you're calculating the distance between the sphere and the line)

Distance between a point and a line:
http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Point-LineDistance3-Dimensional.html

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1  
It's in 2D, not 3D; as you say, this doesn't really matter –  Martijn Jul 2 '09 at 9:21
    
I'm no mathematician so I thought I'd be better outlining a general approach and leaving it to others to figure out specific maths (although I does look rather trivial) –  Martin Jul 2 '09 at 9:30
2  
+1 with a strong upvote. (though I would have linked to another site, the pbourke site looks confusing) All the other answers so far are overcomplicated. Although your comment "That point is also the intersection point on the line" is incorrect, there is no point that has been constructed in the computation process. –  Jason S Jul 2 '09 at 19:03
2  
    
I explained a little better about the closest point, and linked to mathworld instead of pbourke :) –  Martin Jul 2 '09 at 21:19

If the line's coordinates are A.x, A.y and B.x, B.y and the circles center is C.x, C.y then the lines formulae are:

x = A.x * t + B.x * (1 - t)

y = A.y * t + B.y * (1 - t)

where 0<=t<=1

and the circle is

(C.x - x)^2 + (C.y - y)^2 = R^2

if you substitute x and y formulae of the line into the circles formula you get a second order equation of t and its solutions are the intersection points (if there are any). If you get a t which is smaller than 0 or greater than 1 then its not a solution but it shows that the line is 'pointing' to the direction of the circle.

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This solution I found seemed a little easier to follow then some of the other ones.

Taking:

p1 and p2 as the points for the line, and
c as the center point for the circle and r for the radius

I would solve for the equation of the line in slope-intercept form. However, I didn't want to have to deal with difficult equations with c as a point, so I just shifted the coordinate system over so that the circle is at 0,0

p3 = p1 - c
p4 = p2 - c

By the way, whenever I subtract points from each other I am subtracting the x's and then subtracting the y's, and putting them into a new point, just in case someone didn't know.

Anyway, I now solve for the equation of the line with p3 and p4:

m = (p4_y - p3_y) / (p4_x - p3) (the underscore is an attempt at subscript)
y = mx + b
y - mx = b (just put in a point for x and y, and insert the m we found)

Ok. Now I need to set these equations equal. First I need to solve the circle's equation for x

x^2 + y^2 = r^2
y^2 = r^2 - x^2
y = sqrt(r^2 - x^2)

Then I set them equal:

mx + b = sqrt(r^2 - x^2)

And solve for the quadratic equation (0 = ax^2 + bx + c):

(mx + b)^2 = r^2 - x^2
(mx)^2 + 2mbx + b^2 = r^2 - x^2
0 = m^2 * x^2 + x^2 + 2mbx + b^2 - r^2
0 = (m^2 + 1) * x^2 + 2mbx + b^2 - r^2

Now I have my a, b, and c.

a = m^2 + 1
b = 2mb
c = b^2 - r^2

So I put this into the quadratic formula:

(-b ± sqrt(b^2 - 4ac)) / 2a

And substitute in by values then simplify as much as possible:

(-2mb ± sqrt(b^2 - 4ac)) / 2a
(-2mb ± sqrt((-2mb)^2 - 4(m^2 + 1)(b^2 - r^2))) / 2(m^2 + 1)
(-2mb ± sqrt(4m^2 * b^2 - 4(m^2 * b^2 - m^2 * r^2 + b^2 - r^2))) / 2m^2 + 2
(-2mb ± sqrt(4 * (m^2 * b^2 - (m^2 * b^2 - m^2 * r^2 + b^2 - r^2))))/ 2m^2 + 2
(-2mb ± sqrt(4 * (m^2 * b^2 - m^2 * b^2 + m^2 * r^2 - b^2 + r^2)))/ 2m^2 + 2
(-2mb ± sqrt(4 * (m^2 * r^2 - b^2 + r^2)))/ 2m^2 + 2
(-2mb ± sqrt(4) * sqrt(m^2 * r^2 - b^2 + r^2))/ 2m^2 + 2
(-2mb ± 2 * sqrt(m^2 * r^2 - b^2 + r^2))/ 2m^2 + 2
(-2mb ± 2 * sqrt(m^2 * r^2 + r^2 - b^2))/ 2m^2 + 2
(-2mb ± 2 * sqrt(r^2 * (m^2 + 1) - b^2))/ 2m^2 + 2

This is almost as far as it will simplify. Finally, separate out to equations with the ±:

(-2mb + 2 * sqrt(r^2 * (m^2 + 1) - b^2))/ 2m^2 + 2 or     
(-2mb - 2 * sqrt(r^2 * (m^2 + 1) - b^2))/ 2m^2 + 2 

Then simply plug the result of both of those equations into the x in mx + b. For clarity, I wrote some JavaScript code to show how to use this:

function interceptOnCircle(p1,p2,c,r){
    //p1 is the first line point
    //p2 is the second line point
    //c is the circle's center
    //r is the circle's radius

    var p3 = {x:p1.x - c.x, y:p1.y - c.y} //shifted line points
    var p4 = {x:p2.x - c.x, y:p2.y - c.y}

    var m = (p4.y - p3.y) / (p4.x - p3.x); //slope of the line
    var b = p3.y - m * p3.x; //y-intercept of line

    var underRadical = Math.pow((Math.pow(r,2)*(Math.pow(m,2)+1)),2)-Math.pow(b,2)); //the value under the square root sign 

    if (underRadical < 0){
    //line completely missed
        return false;
    } else {
        var t1 = (-2*m*b+2*Math.sqrt(underRadical))/(2 * Math.pow(m,2) + 2); //one of the intercept x's
        var t2 = (-2*m*b-2*Math.sqrt(underRadical))/(2 * Math.pow(m,2) + 2); //other intercept's x
        var i1 = {x:t1,y:m*t1+b} //intercept point 1
        var i2 = {x:t2,y:m*t2+b} //intercept point 2
        return [i1,i2];
    }
}

I hope this helps!

P.S. If anyone finds any errors or has any suggestions, please comment. I am very new and welcome all help/suggestions.

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If possible, also post with some sample values so that we can quickly grasp the flow. –  prabindh Mar 1 at 5:01

This Java Function returns a DVec2 Object. It takes a DVec2 for the center of the circle, the radius of the circle, and a Line.

public static DVec2 CircLine(DVec2 C, double r, Line line)
{
    DVec2 A = line.p1;
    DVec2 B = line.p2;
    DVec2 P;
    DVec2 AC = new DVec2( C );
    AC.sub(A);
    DVec2 AB = new DVec2( B );
    AB.sub(A);
    double ab2 = AB.dot(AB);
    double acab = AC.dot(AB);
    double t = acab / ab2;

    if (t < 0.0) 
    	t = 0.0;
    else if (t > 1.0) 
    	t = 1.0;

    //P = A + t * AB;
    P = new DVec2( AB );
    P.mul( t );
    P.add( A );

    DVec2 H = new DVec2( P );
    H.sub( C );
    double h2 = H.dot(H);
    double r2 = r * r;

    if(h2 > r2) 
    	return null;
    else
    	return P;
}
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Just an addition to this thread... Below is a version of the code posted by pahlevan, but for C#/XNA and tidied up a little:

    /// <summary>
    /// Intersects a line and a circle.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="location">the location of the circle</param>
    /// <param name="radius">the radius of the circle</param>
    /// <param name="lineFrom">the starting point of the line</param>
    /// <param name="lineTo">the ending point of the line</param>
    /// <returns>true if the line and circle intersect each other</returns>
    public static bool IntersectLineCircle(Vector2 location, float radius, Vector2 lineFrom, Vector2 lineTo)
    {
        float ab2, acab, h2;
        Vector2 ac = location - lineFrom;
        Vector2 ab = lineTo - lineFrom;
        Vector2.Dot(ref ab, ref ab, out ab2);
        Vector2.Dot(ref ac, ref ab, out acab);
        float t = acab / ab2;

        if (t < 0)
            t = 0;
        else if (t > 1)
            t = 1;

        Vector2 h = ((ab * t) + lineFrom) - location;
        Vector2.Dot(ref h, ref h, out h2);

        return (h2 <= (radius * radius));
    }
share|improve this answer
    
In C#/XNA you can use Ray.Intersects(BoundingSphere) –  bobobobo Nov 26 '12 at 20:34

enter image description here

' VB.NET - Code

Function CheckLineSegmentCircleIntersection(x1 As Double, y1 As Double, x2 As Double, y2 As Double, xc As Double, yc As Double, r As Double) As Boolean
    Static xd As Double = 0.0F
    Static yd As Double = 0.0F
    Static t As Double = 0.0F
    Static d As Double = 0.0F
    Static dx_2_1 As Double = 0.0F
    Static dy_2_1 As Double = 0.0F

    dx_2_1 = x2 - x1
    dy_2_1 = y2 - y1

    t = ((yc - y1) * dy_2_1 + (xc - x1) * dx_2_1) / (dy_2_1 * dy_2_1 + dx_2_1 * dx_2_1)

    If 0 <= t And t <= 1 Then
        xd = x1 + t * dx_2_1
        yd = y1 + t * dy_2_1

        d = Math.Sqrt((xd - xc) * (xd - xc) + (yd - yc) * (yd - yc))
        Return d <= r
    Else
        d = Math.Sqrt((xc - x1) * (xc - x1) + (yc - y1) * (yc - y1))
        If d <= r Then
            Return True
        Else
            d = Math.Sqrt((xc - x2) * (xc - x2) + (yc - y2) * (yc - y2))
            If d <= r Then
                Return True
            Else
                Return False
            End If
        End If
    End If
End Function
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