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I'm making a Web Application and i'm using MySQL as my DB Backend. My DB will be bigger eventually, like more than 100 million rows in some tables. I just wanted to confirm one thing about such big tables.

Opt 1 . Let's say the tables have Primary Keys and make my query using the Primary Key , but i will need to make run mysql queries, say 100 queries for each user login.

USERID  KEYS

1       {1,2,3,4}

i will get KEYS for user and then make primary key queries to get each value

PRI.KEY  Value

1        google

2        yahoo

3        aol

4        windows

If a user logs in,i need to get his Bookmarked sites for example. So i will make two queries Select KEYS from TB_KEYS where USERID=1; Then i parse the KEYS and for each key, Select Value from TB_VALUES where PRI.KEY=(KEY - i obtained ,parsing from the first query);

Opt 2. I m not making queries using the Primary Keys , but i will need to run few queries for a user's login.

OPT_TABLE_2

USERID  KEY         Value

1       1           google

1       2           yahoo

1       3           aol

1       4           windows

Select value from OPT_TABLE_2 where USERID =1;

Which option would be better ..?

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Your question makes little sense. Can you include some actual SQL queries of the sort of thing you're trying to get? –  Cylindric May 24 '12 at 9:31
    
If a user logs in,i need to get his Bookmarked sites for example. So i will make two queries, in First Approach : Select KEYS from TB_KEYS where USERID=1; Then i parse the KEYS and for each key, Select Value from TB_VALUES where PRI.KEY=(KEY - i obtained ,parsing from the first query); –  Manikanda raj S May 24 '12 at 10:11
    
Edit your question to clarify it, don't just post updates as comments :) That way you get nice formatting, and future readers don't need to scan all the comments for clues. Not sure why you can't just use JOINs though. –  Cylindric May 24 '12 at 10:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

but i will need to make run mysql queries, say 100 queries for each user login.

Then for that reason this approach is wrong. You've not applied the relational database normalisation rules.

but i will need to run few queries for a user's login

Then it's probably still wrong. You should only need to run one query to get the data relating to a user from this structure - either that or you're trying to get information which is not represented by these proposed structures.

Reducing the number of queries will have a massive impact on performance.

It's trivial to test for yourself.

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With a relational database, probably the first one. With proper indexing, doing the filter across the second should be pretty fast, but the first should have much smaller tables which is usually better.

It might be better to actually have three tables: users, user-key pairs, and then keys.

If you're running that many queries though, you really might want to figure out why and run fewer.

As with any performance question that matters: Benchmark it. Generate 10K test users and their data, and see what happens when you run it under each method.

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Anonymous downvote why? –  zebediah49 May 24 '12 at 8:51
    
See answer elsewhere - opt 1 breaks 1st rule of nrormalisation, requires data to be parsed to generate further queries, there is no way to join the tables in the DBMS, query processing overhead. –  symcbean May 24 '12 at 8:54
    
Really? I swear there was some way of selecting a list of indices out of a string in a single, clean step. That's why my second choice was using a third table to link them, if that doesn't work. –  zebediah49 May 24 '12 at 9:00

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