Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to develop a generic List with templates. This list is compound by a Pointer array T* , an integer for getting the number of elements and some methods( find, contains...) It´s important to say that I cannot use std::library.

My problem comes when I am working with a List<List<int> > for instance.

One of the methods make a resizing of the T* pointer array, So when I have this List<List>>I create an auxpointer of a bigger size than T* and copying T content to auxpointer with a memcpy. The inner Pointers (list.T.T) are copied as pointers too, not memory duplicated, so when I delete the T* pointer and reasign T=auxpointer. I have already lost the data of that pointers in my new T.

template <typename T>
void CGenericList<T>::resize()
{
    T* auxPointer = new T[this->maxElements*2];
    memcpy (auxPointer,this->pointer,this->maxElements*sizeof(T));
    delete[] this->pointer;     
    this->pointer=auxPointer;
    this->maxElements=2*this->maxElements;
}

template<class T>
class CGenericList
{
public:
    T* pointer;
    int N;
    int maxElements;

    CGenericList();
    CGenericList(int);
    ~CGenericList();
    void resize();  
}

Can anyone give me any tips for doing it?

thank you in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
Show the problematic code. –  Luchian Grigore May 24 '12 at 8:52
    
Since you described what the problem is, why don't you prefer copying the elements from old array to new array and then destruct the old array ? –  Jagannath May 24 '12 at 8:54
    
because with memcpy it is suposed to be faster, and speed is a critical point of algorithm –  Pau May 24 '12 at 8:56
3  
Well, memcpy is just totally the wrong approach in C++, ever. Maybe std::copy will give you more success? –  Kerrek SB May 24 '12 at 9:11
1  
memcpy is just wrong in C++ (won't work for non-POD T); std::copy should be just as fast. realloc won't mix with new and delete. Why can't you use the std library? –  Oli Charlesworth May 24 '12 at 9:23
show 2 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The code you posted shows some problems.

T* auxPointer = new T[this->maxElements*2];

here you allocate a new array of maxElements*2 - and call the default constructor. Which in your case probably initialises all Listelements.

memcpy (auxPointer,this->pointer,this->maxElements*sizeof(T));

After that you copy the content of your old array to the memory area of the newly allocated memory. This overwrites the pointers to the just created Listelements with the ones from the old array -> memory leak.

delete[] this->pointer;

Then you delete the array, this calls the destructors of all elements. Which hopefully will delete their content and free their memory.

this->pointer=auxPointer;

Finally you reassign the newly created array. The pointers in the list point to the old listselements and point to not allocated memory anymore (because of the call to the destructor via delete[]).

A solution would be to implement an copy constructor for your list and call it for all elements in your array. (DeepCopy) And of course an assignment operator, i almost forgot ;)

CGenericList(const CGenericList<T>& copy);
CGenericList<T>& operator= (const CGenericList<T>& rhs)

Probably somethig like this - be aware that this is "asis" and definitely not exceptionsafe ;)

template<class T>
class CGenericList
{
public:
    T* pointer;
    int N;
    int maxElements;

    CGenericList();
    CGenericList( const CGenericList<T>& copy );
    CGenericList<T>& operator=(const CGenericList<T>& rhs);
    CGenericList(int);
    ~CGenericList();
    void resize();
};

template <typename T>
void CGenericList<T>::resize()
{
    T* auxPointer = new T[this->maxElements*2];
    for(int i=0; i < this->maxElements; i++)
    {
        auxPointer[i] = this->pointer[i];
    }
    delete[] this->pointer;
    this->pointer = auxPointer;
    this->maxElements = this->maxElements*2;
}

template <typename T>
CGenericList<T>::CGenericList()
    :N(0)
    ,maxElements(0)
{
    this->pointer = new T[1];
}

template <typename T>
CGenericList<T>::CGenericList(const CGenericList<T>& copy)
    :N(copy.N)
    ,maxElements(copy.maxElements)
{
    T* temp = new T[copy.maxElements];
    for(int i=0; i<N; i++ )
    {
        temp[i] = copy.pointer[i];
    }
    this->pointer = temp;
}

template <typename T>
CGenericList<T>& CGenericList<T>::operator=(const CGenericList<T>& rhs)
{
    if( this != &rhs )
    {
        delete[] this->pointer;
        this->pointer = new T[rhs.maxElements];
        for(int i=0; i<rhs.maxElements; i++)
        {
            this->pointer[i] = rhs.pointer[i];
        }
    }
    return *this;
}


template <typename T>
CGenericList<T>::CGenericList(int size)
    :N(0)
    ,maxElements(size)
{
    this->pointer = new T[size];
}

template <typename T>
CGenericList<T>::~CGenericList()
{
    delete[] this->pointer;
}


int main(int /*argc*/, char */*argv*/[])
{
    CGenericList<CGenericList<int> > list;
    list.resize();

    return 0;
}

If you don't like to use stl you can have a look at stlport

edit: typos ,)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your resize is not exception safe. You are first deleting the existing array and then allocating memory for a different size and then assigning auxPointer.
Coming to the problem you are having, check if the below approach helps.

T* auxPointer = new T[this->maxElements*2];       
for ( int i =0; i < this->maxElements; ++i)
   std::swap(auxPointer[i], pointer[i]);

delete[] this->pointer;    
this->pointer = auxPointer;  
this->maxElements=2*this->maxElements;
share|improve this answer
    
Why swap rather than copy? Also, this is not exception-safe either (there's a potential for memory leak). –  Oli Charlesworth May 24 '12 at 9:24
    
How is this not exception safe ? Actually, there is a memory leak in Pau's resize(). –  Jagannath May 24 '12 at 9:28
    
copy the pointers to auxPointer and then delete this->pointer. Is this not a problem ? –  Jagannath May 24 '12 at 9:29
    
If any of the copying/swapping throws an exception, then the stack will unwind without deleting the memory you just allocated. –  Oli Charlesworth May 24 '12 at 9:30
    
std::swap() throws ? –  Jagannath May 24 '12 at 9:33
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.