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The following code cannot compile - use of undeclared identifier. I use GCC and XCode for compilation.

Everything is in a single header file.

include "MyArray.h"

template <typename T>
class MyBase {
public:
  MyBase();
  virtual ~MyBase();
  void addStuff(T* someStuff);
protected:
  MyArray<T*> stuff;
};

template <typename T>
MyBase<T>::MyBase() {}
template <typename T>
MyBase<T>::~MyBase() {}

template <typename T>
void MyBase<T>::addStuff(T* someStuff) {
  stuff.add(someStuff);
}

// ---------------------

template <typename T>
class MyDerived : public MyBase<T> {
public:
  MyDerived();
  virtual ~MyDerived();
  virtual void doSomething();
};

template <typename T>
MyDerived<T>::MyDerived() {}
template <typename T>
MyDerived<T>::~MyDerived() {}

template <typename T>
void MyDerived<T>::doSomething() {
  T* thingy = new T();
  addStuff(thingy); //here's the compile error. addStuff is not declared.
}

Does anyone have an explanation? Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
After your fixes there seems to be no problem. do you still see the error without the use of this->? It shouldn't be necessary with a compliant compiler. –  juanchopanza May 24 '12 at 12:14
    
@jua you definitely need to lookup the cursed dependent base lookup rules regarding unqualified names. what you say is incorrect. a conforming compiler will require it. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 24 '12 at 20:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

try

this->addStuff(thingy);
share|improve this answer
    
yes, this-> is it ;) –  user1414745 May 24 '12 at 11:03
    
@juanchopanza: actually, this is right, because the compiler doesn't know that it's dependent. –  Mooing Duck May 24 '12 at 20:06
    
@moo it certainly is dependent and will be looked up at instantiation. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 24 '12 at 20:16
1  
@JohannesSchaub-litb thanks, I will have to do some reading. I have managed to convince myself that it is right and that it is wrong. –  juanchopanza May 24 '12 at 20:42

There are several issues:

  1. Missing semicolons after class definitions.
  2. Missing type for doSomething method declaration/definition.
  3. Missing type for definition of addStuff method.

After fixing that it seems to work.

Edit: As you have fixed the syntax errors and it still does not work. As others have suggested your compiler may require you to call the addStuff method with this-> prefix:

this->addStuff(thingy);
share|improve this answer
1  
I think, that should not work as the Standard. this-> part is a requirement here. –  Nawaz May 24 '12 at 10:35
    
@Nawaz: MSVC2010 works too. Can you post a citation from standard why it should not work? –  Juraj Blaho May 24 '12 at 10:45
1  
@JurajBlaho: If you want to know more about two-phase name lookup, then see this : The Dreaded Two-Phase Name Lookup –  Nawaz May 24 '12 at 10:53
1  
@mike you are wrong. the this-> prefix is required. that the name is dependent is not sufficient for it to be looked up in the dependent base class. gcc fixed this bug in their latest release. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 24 '12 at 19:52
1  
@nawaz no, mike is wrong. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 24 '12 at 19:53

It's due to template inheritance. In such case you should mannualy specify using for base methods:

template <typename T>
MyDerived<T>::doSomething() {
  using MyBase<T>::addStuff;
  T* thingy = new T();
  addStuff(thingy); 
}

or do it by this pointer:

template <typename T>
MyDerived<T>::doSomething() {
  T* thingy = new T();
  this->addStuff(thingy); 
}
share|improve this answer

use this pointer to invoke the addStuff method i.e

this->addStuff(thingy);
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