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Why has the avx sqrt (non-packed) instruction three operands?

vsqrtsd xmm1, xmm2, xmm3

Does this mean something like xmm1=xmm2=sqrt(xmm3)?

Edit: Detailed answer below but in short the assembly line means:

xmm1.low  = sqrt(xmm3.low);
xmm1.high = xmm2.high;
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer's Manual, Volume 2B, Page 4-407, "SQRTSD—Compute Square Root of Scalar Double-Precision Floating- Point Value":

VSQRTSD xmm1, xmm2, xmm3/m64

Computes square root of the low double-precision floating point value in xmm3/m64 and stores the results in xmm1*. Also, upper double precision floating-point value (bits[127:64]) from xmm2 is copied to xmm1[127:64].

Operation

DEST[63:0] ← SQRT(SRC2[63:0])
DEST[127:64] ← SRC1[127:64]
DEST[VLMAX-1:128] ← 0

The instruction is simply following the pattern of other binary V___SD and V___SS operations like VSUBSD, which performs

DEST[63:0] ← SRC1[63:0] - SRC2[63:0]
DEST[127:64] ← SRC1[127:64]
DEST[VLMAX-1:128] ← 0

and like VRCPSS xmm1, xmm2, xmm3/32, which performs

DEST[31:0] ← APPROXIMATE(1/SRC2[31:0])
DEST[127:32] ← SRC1[127:32]
DEST[VLMAX-1:128] ← 0

The general form is like

xmm1.low = f(xmm2.low, xmm3.low);
xmm1.high = xmm2.high,

as described in Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual, Volume 1, §11.4.1 "Packed and Scalar Double-Precision Floating-Point Instructions". For VSQRTSD we just define f(x, y) = √y, ignoring the first operand.


*: Note: The Intel Manual writes "xmm2" here, which is an error.

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Thanks for the detailed explanation! But shouldn't the first sentence be: ... and stores the results in xmm1? –  tom May 24 '12 at 14:28
    
@tom: Right. Intel's manual has errors here and there. –  kennytm May 24 '12 at 14:41

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