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I have an IEnumerable<T>. I want to do one thing for each item of the collection, except the last item, to which I want to do something else. How can I code this neatly? In Pseudocode

foreach (var item in collection)
{
    if ( final )
    {
        g(item)
    }
    else
    {
        f(item)
    }
}

So if my IEnumerable were Enumerable.Range(1,4) I'd do f(1) f(2) f(3) g(4). NB. If my IEnumerable happens to be length 1, I want g(1).

My IEnumerable happens to be kind of crappy, making Count() as expensive as looping over the whole thing.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Since you mention IEnumerable[<T>] (not IList[<T>] etc), we can't rely on counts etc: so I would be tempted to unroll the foreach:

using(var iter = source.GetEnumerator()) {
    if(iter.MoveNext()) {
        T last = iter.Current;
        while(iter.MoveNext()) {
            // here, "last" is a non-final value; do something with "last"
            last = iter.Current;
        }
        // here, "last" is the FINAL one; do something else with "last"
    }
}

Note the above is technically only valid for IEnuemerable<T>; for non-generic, you'd need:

var iter = source.GetEnumerator();
using(iter as IDisposable) {
    if(iter.MoveNext()) {
        SomeType last = (SomeType) iter.Current;
        while(iter.MoveNext()) {
            // here, "last" is a non-final value; do something with "last"
            last = (SomeType) iter.Current;
        }
        // here, "last" is the FINAL one; do something else with "last"
    }
}
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Thanks I put that in an extension method gist.github.com/2781446 –  Colonel Panic May 24 '12 at 13:06
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If you want to do this as efficiently as possible there is no other choice than effectively looking at not only the current but also the "next" or "previous" item, so you can defer the decision of what to do after you have that information. For example, assuming T is the type of items in the collection:

if (collection.Any()) {
    var seenFirst = false;
    T prev = default(T);
    foreach (var current in collection) {
        if (seenFirst) Foo(prev);
        seenFirst = true;
        prev = current;
    }
    Bar(prev);
}

See it in action.

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reverse and tolist are both buffering operations... for a long sequence, this could be really really painful. –  Marc Gravell May 24 '12 at 10:50
    
@MarcGravell: Sure. I thought to give the quick and dirty solutions first and the good one last, but it turns out the good one isn't any longer than the quickies so out the window they go. :) –  Jon May 24 '12 at 10:57
    
that's nicer ;p –  Marc Gravell May 24 '12 at 11:04
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not 100% sure I like this but you could always delay the use of item until you've moved one step in to the IEnumerable array, that way when you get to the end you've not used the last entry.

it avoids having to force a count on the enumerator.

object item = null;
foreach (var a in items)
{
  // if item is set then we can use it.
  if (item != null)
  {
      // not final item
      f(item);
  }
  item = a;
}

// final item.
g(item);
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1  
null could be a perfectly valid value... –  Marc Gravell May 24 '12 at 10:49
    
The initial value doesn't actually have to be null, you could set it to anything that's not a valid value and just check that it's not equal to that. Or use a flag to say it's the first loop. –  Andy May 24 '12 at 10:54
    
It's possible that there are no invalid values. –  Servy Feb 19 '13 at 3:01
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I wouldn't really recommend it, but I guess you could do something like this...

object m_item = notPartOfListFlag = new object();
foreach(var item in enumerator){
   if(m_item != notPartOfListFlag)
   {
      //do stuff to m_item;
   }
   m_item = item;
}
//do stuff to last item aka m_item;

But I would try to use some kind of collection that exposes the position of the items in the list, then use

if(collection.IndexOf(item) == collection.Count-1) do stuff
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null is a perfectly valid value... –  Marc Gravell May 24 '12 at 10:45
    
That's true, give me a sec and I'll update it to account for that. –  JonC May 24 '12 at 10:49
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Similar to Marc's answer, but you could write an extension method to wrap it up.

public static class LastEnumerator
{
    public static IEnumerable<MetaEnumerableItem<T>> GetLastEnumerable<T>(this IEnumerable<T> blah)
    {
        bool isFirst = true;
        using (var enumerator = blah.GetEnumerator())
        {
            if (enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                bool isLast;
                do
                {
                    var current = enumerator.Current;
                    isLast = !enumerator.MoveNext();
                    yield return new MetaEnumerableItem<T>
                        {
                            Value = current,
                            IsLast = isLast,
                            IsFirst = isFirst
                        };
                    isFirst = false;
                } while (!isLast);
            }
        }

    }
}

public class MetaEnumerableItem<T>
{
    public T Value { get; set; }
    public bool IsLast { get; set; }
    public bool IsFirst { get; set; }
}

Then call it like so:

foreach (var row in records.GetLastEnumerable())
{
    output(row.Value);
    if(row.IsLast)
    {
        outputLastStuff(row.Value);
    }
}
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