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I am wondering if someone can outline the main differences, pro-s and con-s of using ReadProcessMemory/WriteProcessMemory over Marshal.Copy in Windows .NET (C#/VB.net) applications to read from / write to the application's process' memory (not memory of other processes). In particular for operations involving arbitrary addresses in process' memory and dealing with memory block as byte arrays (i.e. reading/writing raw data).

Would Marshal.Copy work in all cases where ReadProcessMemory/WriteProcessMemory works, or is it more limiting?

Does Marshal.Copy's implementation use ReadProcessMemory/WriteProcessMemory APIs internally?

To clarify: I am talking about reading from / writing to the calling (owning) process's memory only, not the memory of other processes!

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

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ReadProcessMemory and WriteProcessMemory are native Win32 APIs that allow you to read and write from and to the memory of a different processes. You only ever need to use those APIs when trying to read and write memory in a different process. As you may imagine, they are not often used in routine development.

Marshal.Copy is used to copy between managed and unmanaged memory, but within the same process.

Would Marshal.Copy work in all cases where ReadProcessMemory/WriteProcessMemory works, or is it more limiting?

No, Marshal.Copy it is limited to operating within a single process.

Does Marshal.Copy's implementation use ReadProcessMemory/WriteProcessMemory APIs internally?

No.

To clarify: I am talking about reading from / writing to the calling (owning) process's memory only, not the memory of other processes!

In which case, ReadProcessMemory and WriteProcessMemory are simply not pertinent to your needs.

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Thank you for this explanation! The only thing I am still unsure about is that both ReadProcessMemory/WriteProcessMemory have associated bytesRead/Written parameters, and Marshal.Copy does not. For example, if I use ReadProcessMemory to read a loaded module into managed byte array, I know the size of the module by looking at the number of bytes read supplied by ReadProcessMemory. I cannot do the same with Marshal.Copy, which, as it seems, would require me to know in advance the size of the module I would read from the memory. –  Fit Dev May 24 '12 at 12:04
    
No, you have to know beforehand when using ReadProcessMemory too. You pass that information in through the nSize parameter. The lpNumberOfBytesRead parameter just tells you how many bytes were actually read. In Marshal.Copy, if for some reason not all bytes can be read, then an exception will be raised. You simply don't want anything to do with ReadProcessMemory and WriteProcessMemory. They aren't for you. –  David Heffernan May 24 '12 at 12:06
    
Yes, I understand that nSize is effectively similar to length parameter, but also having the lpNumberOfBytesRead parameter populated has a nice side effect that I would know the exact size of the module. In other words, for nSize I can guesstimate the number o bytes I want to read, passing the value twice as much for example, and then by looking at the lpNumberOfBytesRead I would know the actual size of the data I am interested in. With that in mind, how would I accomplish similar task using Marshal.Copy only when reading loaded assembly modules? –  Fit Dev May 24 '12 at 12:11
    
I'm not sure how you are loading these "assembly modules" or indeed what they are, but I'll bet that whatever mechanism you use has some means of telling you how big the chunk of memory is. The lpNumberOfBytesRead is not designed to be used the way you describe. –  David Heffernan May 24 '12 at 12:13
    
The modules are regular .net assembly modules... After I call ReadProcessMemory(Process.GetCurrentProcess().Handle, Marshal.GetHINSTANCE(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetModules()[0]), ByteArrayLargeEnoughToHoldData, ArrayLengthBiggerThanModule, out ActualBytesReadIEModuleSize); I can resize the ByteArrayLargeEnoughToHoldData according to the ActualBytesReadIEModuleSize. How to do the same thing with Marshal.Copy is not clear... is it even possible? –  Fit Dev May 24 '12 at 12:19

Marshal.Copy() is not a substitute for Read/WriteProcessMemory(). It cannot reach into the address space of a process and access memory owned by that process. The strongest hint that this is so is that it doesn't have an overload that takes a process handle.

Keep in mind that every process in Windows has its own virtual memory address space. Pointers in one process are not usable in another. This is a big part of the process isolation that Windows provides, keeping processes from destabilizing each other. And providing security guarantees, using ReadProcessMemory() requires admin rights if the processes are not owned by the same user. The process handle must be acquired by specifying PROCESS_VM_READ/WRITE in the OpenProcess() call, a high privilege.

This is not an issue if you are accessing a pointer in your own process. In that case, you are simply relying on the Marshal.Copy() built into the pinvoke marshaller. Nicely hidden from view but certainly not faster than Copy() since you are adding the overhead of making the pinvoke call and Windows executing the function. Marshal.Copy() is simple and fast, just the equivalent of memcpy().

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Thank you for clarification. I guess I did not phrase it clearly. I was looking for possible differences only in as far as reading/writing to the calling process's moemory, not into memory of other processes. –  Fit Dev May 24 '12 at 11:53
    
Right, answer updated. –  Hans Passant May 24 '12 at 11:56

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