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Say I have function with_foo that takes a block, and wrap it around a piece of code, like

with_foo do
  puts "hello!"
end

Now I would like to make the wrapping conditional, like

if do_with_foo?
  with_foo do
    puts "hello!"
  end
else
  puts "hello!" # without foo
end

Is there any way to write this shorter/more elegantly, meaning without having to repeat the code puts "hello!"?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

if you are willing to specify argument with a block, it is possible.

given with foo above, you can write such snippet:

whatever = proc {puts "hello"}
#build a proc object with a block
if do_with_foo?
  with_foo &whatever
#pass it to with_foo
else
  whatever.call
#normally call it
end
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looks better than my solution, but I was looking for a way which doesn't even require me to write whatever twice. Any ideas? –  zero-divisor May 24 '12 at 12:34
    
@zero-divisor: I added an answer using a bit of meta-programming. I don't think that you can do it directly with the existing infrastructure. –  tokland May 24 '12 at 13:34

A proof of concept using the proxy pattern:

class BlockWrapper
  def initialize(obj, use_wrapper)
    @obj = obj
    @use_wrapper = use_wrapper
  end

  def method_missing(*args, &block)
    @use_wrapper ? @obj.send(*args, &block) : block.call
  end
end

module Kernel
  def wrap_if(use_wrapper)
    BlockWrapper.new(self, use_wrapper)        
  end
end

def with_foo
  puts "with_foo: start"
  yield
  puts "with_foo: end"
end

wrap_if(true).with_foo do 
  puts "hello!"
end

wrap_if(false).with_foo do 
  puts "hello, no with_foo here!"
end

Output:

with_foo: start
hello!
with_foo: end
hello, no with_foo here!
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took me a little bet to get behind the concept but I think I got it now, looks good! Why do we actually need to open the Object class here? –  zero-divisor May 29 '12 at 9:51
    
@zero-divisor: yeah, it's hard to grasp at first, metaprogramming in Ruby may be ugly to implement but it's a joy to use. We need wrap_if to be available everywhere (it's a generic feature), so we either add it to class Object or to the module Kernel (which is included in Object). –  tokland May 29 '12 at 11:29

I think you can do this:

def without_foo &pr
  pr.call
end

send(do_with_foo?? "with_foo" : "without_foo") do
  puts "hello!"
end
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I like that one too, although it's not that human readable. –  zero-divisor May 24 '12 at 15:20
    
Which part is not human readable? You do not like ternary operators? –  sawa May 24 '12 at 15:36
    
it's not only the ternary operator (which I do like although I prefer it when making an conditional assignment), it's also the fact that we have to define a wrapping function here which does nothing. Especially in Ruby it's usually possible to write code where you already now what it does after looking at it for one second, and I was looking for such a type of solution. –  zero-divisor May 28 '12 at 19:38

You can put the duplication code into Proc object and pass it to the method as block or call it directly.

hello = proc { puts 'hello' }

with_foo(&hello)
# OR
hello.call
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def simple_yielder
  yield
end
def maybe_with condition, with_method
  send( condition ? with_method : :simple_yielder ) { yield }
end

#...

maybe_with( do_with_foo?, :with_foo ) do
  puts "Hello?"
end
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