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I need to transform this structure

<A>
<B>value1</B>
</A>
<A>
<B>value2</B>
</A>

into

<A>
<B>value1<B>
<B>value2<B>
</A>

What is best solution using XSLT-1.0? Thank you!

PS: I tried this code:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> 
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.1" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" xmlns:fo="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Format"> 
<xsl:output method="xml" version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" indent="yes"/>   
<xsl:key name="group_a" match="//A" use="B"/> 
<xsl:template match="/Test"> <a-node> <xsl:for-each select="//A"> <b-node> 
<xsl:value-of select="//A/B"/> </b-node> </xsl:for-each> </a-node> 
</xsl:template> 
</xsl:stylesheet> 

but it returns only first value:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <a-node mlns:fo="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Format"> <b-node>value1</b-node> <b-node>value1</b-node> </a-node> 

but I need:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <a-node xmlns:fo="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Format"> <b-node>value1</b-node> <b-node>value2</b-node> </a-node>
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since it seems you need to collapse all the children under a single node, then you don't need the foreach on "A", you can move directly to the "B" children

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
                version="1.0">
    <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" method="xml" version="1.0" />
    <xsl:template match="/">
        <A>
            <xsl:for-each select="//A/B">
                <B>
                    <xsl:value-of select="./text()"/>
                </B>
            </xsl:for-each>
        </A>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

EDIT As per @Sean's comment, note that // should never be used in real life. Replace // with the path from your real root Element.

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Functionally correct but inefficient. Better to use a template style and avoid unnecessary use of the // operator. –  Sean B. Durkin May 24 '12 at 14:12
    
@Sean - sure - Agreed never use // but had no choice since OP's xml sample has no root element :) –  StuartLC May 24 '12 at 15:11

This style-sheet ...

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
                version="1.0">
    <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" method="xml" version="1.0" />
    <xsl:template match="/">
       <A>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="*/A/B"/>
       </A>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="B">
      <B><xsl:value-of select="."/></B>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

... will transform ...

<root>
<A>
<B>value1</B>
</A>
<A>
<B>value2</B>
</A>
</root>

... into this ...

 <A><B>value1</B><B>value2</B></A>
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This transformation uses one of the most fundamental XSLT design patterns -- overriding the identity transform. Thus, it is easier to write, understand, maintain and extend:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="A[1]">
  <A>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|following-sibling::A/node()"/>
  </A>
 </xsl:template>
 <xsl:template match="A"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the following XML document (obtained by wrapping the provided XML fragment into a single top element -- to make this a well-formed XML document):

<t>
    <A>
        <B>value1</B>
    </A>
    <A>
        <B>value2</B>
    </A>
</t>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<t>
   <A>
      <B>value1</B>
      <B>value2</B>
   </A>
</t>
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