Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class with the following structure:

class Nginx_sender
{
    private:
        std::vector<std::string> mMessagesBuffer;
        boost::mutex mMutex;

       void SendMessage(const std::string &msg)
       {
           mMutex.lock();
           mMessagesBuffer.push_back(msg);
           mMutex.unlock();

           std::cout << "Vector size: " << mMessagesBuffer.size() << std::endl;
       }

       void NewThreadFunction()
       {
          while(true) {
            mMutex.lock();
            if (mMessagesBuffer.size() >= 1) std::cout << ">=1\n";
            mMutex.unlock();

            boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::milliseconds(200));
          }
       }
};

int main()
{
   Nginx_sender *NginxSenderHandle;
   boost::thread sender(boost::bind(&Nginx_sender::NewThreadFunction, &NginxSenderHandle));
   // ...
}

NewThreadFunction is running in new thread and it checks the size of mMessagesBuffer. Now I call anywhere in main function: NginxSenderHandle->SendMessage("Test");

This shows up: Vector size: 1 first time, 2 second time etc.

But! In NewThreadFunction it's always == 0. Why could it be?

share|improve this question
    
You should only check the buffer size while holding the mutex, as in, print or save to a local variable the value of mMessagesBuffer.size(). See what happens then. –  EmeryBerger May 24 '12 at 13:05
1  
Are you absolutely sure that you haven't accidentally created two Nginx_senders? Post a complete main which exhibits the behaviour. –  molbdnilo May 24 '12 at 14:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I bet compiler is caching some of mMessagesBuffer internals in thread-local cache. Try adding 'volatile' keyword to mMessagesBuffer to disable such optimizations.

share|improve this answer
1  
volatile shouldn't be necessary when mutex is used. –  Haozhun May 24 '12 at 12:50
    
@Gene Compiler doesn't know about mutexes, does it? –  Ockonal May 24 '12 at 12:54
    
@Ockonal It doesn't. But mutex knows how to instruct compiler to not break it. –  Haozhun May 24 '12 at 12:55
    
@user1415080 Are you sure mutex won't add memory barriers? –  Haozhun May 24 '12 at 12:56
    

You are most probably creating another copy of Nginx_sender when you bind it. Do you really need to reference NginxSenderHandle before passing it to bind() (it's already a pointer)? http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_49_0/libs/bind/bind.html#with_member_pointers

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.