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I have a problem with respect to XML Serialization. I shall try to explain it with the following example xml file

<AutoExpo>
  <Details>
    <Venue>XYZ</Venue>
    <StartTime>09:00</StartTime>
    <EndTime>21:00</EndTime>
  </Details>

  <Cars>
      <Car>
        <Company>Chevrolet</Company>
        <Model>Cruz</Model>
        <Color>Red</Color>
      </Car>

      <Car>
        <Company>Ford</Company>
        <Model>Fiesta</Model>
        <Color>Blue</Color>
      </Car>

  </Cars>
</AutoExpo>

Now, when I read this xml file, I deserialize the cars into objects. The car list can be huge. My code uses this objects and can change the properties of some cars. Now what if I want to serialize only those car objects whose properties have changed, back to the xml file and save it so that next time when my code starts it gets the latest state information.

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5 Answers 5

It would be quite difficult to jump around in the XML file changing properties here and there, wherever they have changed. You should just read the whole file into memory, and when you save, write out the whole thing, overwriting the old file.

XML isn't a terrible way of doing this, but as far as I can tell from the question, a SQL Server (or other RDBMS) database would be much more appropriate. You won't have to worry about issues like this, as the DB engine will do that for you.

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Although it may not be the best solution, a potentially viable option would be to serialize the edited list to a seperate file and, in code, compare the two files. If there hasn't been any changes to the information the two text files should be identical. If not, you can replace the old file with the new file. The easiest way would be, rather than serialize to a file and read/write it, perhaps send it to a stream and compare them.

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When you serialize an object, it generates the entire XML document. So, if you save that to a file, it will overwrite the previous content of the file. Therefore, if you want the resulting file to contain all the cars, including, but not limited to, the modified ones, then you need to serialize the whole thing. If you only serialized the ones that changed, the file would lose all the cars that did not change. If you really do only want to serialize the changed cars, I would suggest creating a new instance of the AutoExpo object and only insert into it the cars that you want to save, then serialize that object with only the partial list.

If you need to just modify a single element in the XML without touching the rest of it because the data is too big, XML is not a good choice. I would suggest a relational database instead. Alternatively, you could store each car as its own XML file and only load and save each one individually as necessary.

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You cannot do that with XML. Consider using a relational database. Relational databases have a built-in file space management mechanism allowing doing exactly what you need. You can update single records, add and delete records.

A Jet .mdb database (Access) is a good candidate for the replacement of a XML-File. You can access it via OLEDB with the restriction that the application must be compiled for 32 bit. Access needs not to be installed.

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First of all, your entities must have unique identifiers.

<AutoExpo>
  <Details>
    <Venue>XYZ</Venue>
    <StartTime>09:00</StartTime>
    <EndTime>21:00</EndTime>
  </Details>

  <Cars>
    <Car id="1">
      <Company>Chevrolet</Company>
      <Model>Cruz</Model>
      <Color>Red</Color>
    </Car>
    <Car id="2">
      <Company>Ford</Company>
      <Model>Fiesta</Model>
      <Color>Blue</Color>
    </Car>
  </Cars>
</AutoExpo>

Now you could use XPath to select those nodes that require updates and change their content.

  1. load the document into an XDocument
  2. find a car: document.Element("Car[id=2]")
  3. set the new value: element.Element("Color").Value = "Black"

However, the downside of using a file-based storage remains. You still have to load the whole file into memory and write it back to the hard drive when you're down updating, but you do not have to serialize all Car objects. I can't think of an easy way to stream the file from hard drive and manipulate it in one go.

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Another solution might be to just save the changes into one file and to create snapshots every now and then. As a matter of fact, you would have to parse multiple files (the latest snapshot plus all changes) just to "open" your database. PS: As other have suggested, take a look at a relational database, or maybe at an XML-based database which might help with migrating your data. –  Axel May 24 '12 at 13:26

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