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I have the following C# Entity Framework code first entities defined:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)

    {
        var context = new MyContext();

        var person = new Person
        {
            FirstName = "Nadege",
                    LastName = "Deroussen",
                    BirthDate = DateTime.Now,
                    AccessCode = new AccessCode { Code = "ABC" }
        };
        context.Persons.Add(person);

        var accessCode = new AccessCode { Code = "MGH" };
        context.AccessCodes.Add(accessCode);
        context.SaveChanges();


        var person = context.Persons.Where(e => e.Id == 1).Single();            
        person.AccessCodeId = 2;

        context.SaveChanges();

        Console.Write("Person saved !");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

public class Person
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public DateTime BirthDate { get; set; }


    public int AccessCodeId { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("AccessCodeId")]
    public virtual AccessCode AccessCode { get; set; }
}

public class AccessCode
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Code { get; set; }
}

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Person> Persons { get; set; }
    public DbSet<AccessCode> AccessCodes { get; set; }
}

In the Main method, after assigning AccessCodeId = 2, if I check the AccessCode reference in the person, it is still pointing to the AccessCode with Id == 1. How can I get this auto-updated?

I am learning EF, so please excuse me if this doesn't make sense.

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Do the Persons and AccessCodes sets generate their own identity? –  daveL May 24 '12 at 13:03
    
Person has 2 properties: AccessCode and AccessCodeId. You don't need AccessCodeId in Person because you have AccessCode.Id accessible from Person. Delete that property and EF will generate the relationship between Persons and AccessCodes automatically. Now is not showing the change because you are setting one property and getting other different, so be careful. –  David Diez May 24 '12 at 13:23
    
@daveL Since both entities has a property Id, EF automatically makes them the primary key. –  Babu James May 24 '12 at 14:08
    
The second var in your code causes compilation error. It needs to get removed. –  Juraj Suchár May 25 '12 at 4:41
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have to call ChangeTracker's DetectChanges() method after you change the foreign key property value

person.AccessCodeId = 2;
context.ChangeTracker.DetectChanges();

Note: I've tested this behavior on @lucask code and your code too. Your code just needed to correct the second declaration of person variable.

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Thank you for your suggestion. It indeed works. Is there any way that I can trigger this method automatically on assigning the Id? –  Babu James May 25 '12 at 4:41
1  
It will work automatically, if you declare all properties within the Person class as virtual and replace var person = new Person() with var person = context.Persons.Create(); This will create so-called Change Tracking Proxy instead of a simple POCO class. Some useful information is here Entity types supported by the Entity Framework and here Should you use Entity Framework change-tracking proxies? –  Juraj Suchár May 25 '12 at 7:12
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Well, I don't agree with @David. Code First, Database First or Model First are just different methods to accomplish the same goal. And Code First with Data Annotations or Fluent API is very powerful. You just have to learn how to use it.

Your code will work. First of all remove [ForeignKey("AccessCodeId")]. It's redundant and You placed it on the wrong property anyway. Code First will set AccessCodeId as foreign key by convention. AccessCode is navigation property, won't be generated in the database and it's only here to make your life easier. For more information read this article: Code First Conventions.

Here's working code (which I tested):

public class Person
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public DateTime BirthDate { get; set; }

    public int AccessCodeId { get; set; }
    public virtual AccessCode AccessCode { get; set; }
}

public class AccessCode
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Code { get; set; }
}

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Person> Persons { get; set; }
    public DbSet<AccessCode> AccessCodes { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Database.SetInitializer<MyContext>(new DropCreateDatabaseAlways<MyContext>());

        var context = new MyContext();

        var person = new Person
        {
            FirstName = "Nadege",
            LastName = "Deroussen",
            BirthDate = DateTime.Now,
            AccessCode = new AccessCode { Code = "ABC" }
        };
        context.Persons.Add(person);

        var accessCode = new AccessCode { Code = "MGH" };
        context.AccessCodes.Add(accessCode);
        context.SaveChanges();


        var person2 = context.Persons.FirstOrDefault();
        person2.AccessCodeId = 2;
        // or person2.AccessCode = accessCode;

        context.SaveChanges();

        Console.Write("Person saved !");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Changes will be visible in the database context.

share|improve this answer
    
First of all, thank you all for finding time to answer/test this. @lucask [ForeignKey("AccessCodeId")] was added because otherwise the EF generated the table with navigation property Id column as AccessCode_Id and I wanted it without the "underscore". –  Babu James May 24 '12 at 14:05
    
Coming to the solution @lucask suggested, I tried the code you posted, but it doesn't work as expected. The expected behavior is that the AccessCode property in the person must be updated to that with Id 2 immediately after I make the assignment of the AccessCodeId. Right now, this only happens after the method SaveChanges() is called. I am not sure if this is how it can work. –  Babu James May 24 '12 at 14:06
    
Also could you explain the line: Database.SetInitializer<MyContext>(new DropCreateDatabaseAlways<MyContext>()); –  Babu James May 24 '12 at 14:06
    
Except that, your code works fine! –  Babu James May 24 '12 at 14:08
1  
@David: Nothing prevents you to use Code First approach with already existing database. I'm not saying that one is better than other. It really depends on a project you are working on and its requirements. For me personally working with POCO classes instead of a pre-generated code from edmx files is easier, cleaner and gives me more flexibility. –  lucask May 24 '12 at 18:46
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Finally I got the expected behavior with the following code:

   namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Database.SetInitializer<TestContext>(new DropCreateDatabaseAlways<TestContext>());
            var context = new TestContext();
            var child = new Child { };
            var parent = new Parent { Child = child };
            context.Parents.Add(parent);
            context.Children.Add(new Child { });

            context.SaveChanges();

            context.Parents.First().ChildId = 2;
            context.SaveChanges();
        }
    }

    public class Parent
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public virtual int ChildId { get; set; }
        public virtual Child Child { get; set; }
    }
    public class Child
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
    }
    public class TestContext : DbContext
    {
        public DbSet<Parent> Parents { get; set; }
        public DbSet<Child> Children { get; set; }
    }
}

Image shows the debug session, in that just after assigning the ChildId (before SaveChanges() is called), the Child property also gets correctly updated. Thanks to all those who made their valuable suggestions.

enter image description here

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