Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have several classes which I connected to AngelScript engine. This engine uses interesting way to allocate objects: It allocates needed amount of memory (possibly with malloc()) and when authors propose to use construction like this to create object in this memory:

static void Constructor(ObjectType *thisPointer)
{
    new(thisPointer) ObjectType();
}

and code like this to destroy object:

static void Destructor(ObjectType *thisPointer)
{
     thisPointer->~ObjectType();
}

I have several questions:

  • Is it correct way to use destructor this way? (Eclipse judges this as a bug) As far as I can understand this code should call destructor without deallocating memory (calling free())
  • Is it possible to use delete(thisPointer) (or something like it) instead of this construction and is it will be equivalent? (at least this code gives no errors during compilation and runtime)
  • Is there other ways to call destructor without deallocating memory?

Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question
    
After searching for "placement delete" found Stroustrup: C++ Style and Technique FAQ with short answer to question "Is there a "placement delete"?" - "No, but if you need one you can write your own." Maybe this will help someone. –  Yuriy Petrovskiy May 25 '12 at 16:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is it correct way to use destructor this way?

Yes. You constructed the object in-place using placement-new, and so it must be destroyed with an explicit destructor call (assuming it has a non-trivial destructor).

Is it possible to use delete(thisPointer) (or something like it) instead of this construction and is it will be equivalent?

No. delete will attempt to use operator delete() to release the memory to the free store; this is only valid if it was allocated with a normal new expression (or perhaps an explicit use of operator new()).

Is there other ways to call destructor without deallocating memory?

Not really. Calling the destructor is certainly the clearest and simplest way to call the destructor.

share|improve this answer

C++ is a bit misleading here:

Construction and memory management are actually completely unrelated processes which C++ munges together in new and delete for convenience.

However, C++ doesn’t actually have a dedicated syntax to call a constructor on existing memory – to do this, you need to use the “placement new” syntax which actually is not a conventional new at all – i.e., it doesn’t allocate memory.

On the other hand, there is a syntax to call the destructor of an object. And your code uses it correctly. And no, using delete would not be equivalent, it would free memory in addition to calling a destructor.

Compare this with the std::allocator class, which has the methods (and their corresponding semantics)

  • allocate (== ::operator new(sizeof T))
  • deallocate (== ::operator delete(&x))
  • construct (== new (&x) T())
  • destroy (== x.~T())

These correspond precisely to the different aspects of an object’s lifetime cycle.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, just to emphasise this point once more: operator new and new are two different things, even though they look so similar. The latter may (!) call the former, but doesn’t always (in the placement-new variant). –  Konrad Rudolph May 24 '12 at 13:20
    
All new expressions call some overload of operator new(); placement new calls one that has no effect. –  Mike Seymour May 24 '12 at 13:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.