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When creating an array of literals in JS:

[{ name: 'david', value: 'blue' }, { name: 'harold', value: 'orange' }]

The only way I can see of writing this in Coffeescript is:

[
  name: 'david'
  value: 'blue'
,
  name: 'harold'
  value: 'orange'
]

To me this is pretty ugly, that "floating" comma doesn't really sit well. Are there any alternative syntaxes for this? I am aware you can continue to use a JS-style approach from within Coffeescript but I was hoping for something more concise.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This has been the one thing that every CoffeeScript developer seems to run into.

I'm afraid it's all we have for now. The only other alternative I can think of is:

[
  { name: 'david', value: 'blue' }
  { name: 'harold', value: 'orange' }
]

… but it's far from ideal itself.

If anyone wanted to suggest an alternate, concise and CS-y syntax, I'd be happy to try to implement it in the parser and make a pull request for it. I'd love to have better than this.

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1  
The only thing that occurred to me was simply: [ name: 'david', value: 'blue' <NEWLINE> name: 'harold', value: 'orange' ] Sorry for the poor formatting, this is what I mean: pastebin.com/k0QbUjrv It would save four more characters and the newline serves as a separator between elements. I suspect there is something else in Coffeescript that prevents this though :) –  Colin Ramsay May 24 '12 at 15:35
    
@colinramsay: Yeah, that looks good to me too; I'm only reluctant because it already parses as a single option, so it'd break backwards compatibility and be less likely to be accepted. –  Yuki Izumi May 24 '12 at 23:34
    
@colinramsay The problem with that syntax it that it would be ambiguous as it conflicts with the object literal syntax (example: an object literal taking more than one line and with more than one property per line), and objects cannot have repeated keys. –  epidemian May 25 '12 at 1:38
    
As a new syntax addition, i would prefer LiveScript's use of asterisks to denote object literals inside arrays :) –  epidemian May 25 '12 at 1:43
    
@epidemian the asterisk approach is ok I guess, I wonder if it'd be accepted? –  Colin Ramsay May 25 '12 at 12:23

I can't remember why this works, or even if it's useful to you, but it's another alternative to the code you're writing.

[
  {}= name: 'david', value: 'blue'
  {}= name: 'harold', value: 'orange'
]

Yes, this seems to work.

This also weirdly seems to work. I'm sure there's a simple reason for it, but I'm not sure of it.

[
  {}= 
    name: 'david'
    value: 'blue'
  {}= 
    name: 'harold'
    value: 'orange'
  {}= 
    name: 'david'
    value: 'blue'
]

See the compiled code.

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o_O This is really weird. Me likes! =D –  epidemian May 24 '12 at 17:01
4  
{} = is an empty destructuring assignment which destructs nothing and simply evaluates to the right operand. [] = works the same as well. –  matyr May 24 '12 at 22:33

To get rid of the commas inside the object literals you can go for:

[
  {
    name: 'david'
    value: 'blue'
  }, {
    name: 'harold'
    value: 'orange'
  }, {
    name: 'david'
    value: 'blue'
  }
]

Or, if you really hate commas:

[
  {
    name: 'david'
    value: 'blue'
  }
  {
    name: 'harold'
    value: 'orange'
  }
  {
    name: 'david'
    value: 'blue'
  }
]

Though i personally feel that the floating commas, indented one level, don't look so bad:

[
    name: 'david'
    value: 'blue'
  , 
    name: 'harold'
    value: 'orange'
  , 
    name: 'david'
    value: 'blue'
]

I think it makes it pretty obvious when object literals start and finish and it also makes it nearly impossible to forget a comma between object literals =D

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@Yuki Izumi asks how this should be implemented (I don't have the karma to comment on his reply directly).

What I childishly attempt to do in coffeescript is something like this:

arrayOfLiterals = 'somekey': 'someval' 'otherkey': 'otherval' 'keyInOtherArrayElement': 'andItsVal' 'yetMoreInSecondElement': 'andItsVal' 'thirdElement': 'val' 'fourthElement': 'val'

This is my two cents

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