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I am new to Perl and trying to decode a Perl script which reads an Excel file and export the data into a text file. One of the steps in the script is performing weirdly. This is the step:

@array_name = grep {$_} @array_name;

This step just truncates the last column if the value is 0; otherwise it works properly. If I remove this step, the last column with value 0 is back, but it includes some dummy NULL columns in my extract which are not part of my source Excel file.

Can someone please help me understand this step?

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3 Answers 3

The grep command filters non empty content. So everything that does not evaluate as true will be discarded. Empty cells and cells containing 0 will be removed. If you just want to remove empty cells you could use

@array_name = grep { defined && length } @array_name ;

instead.

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This works like a gem. Thank you so much, really appreciate your help. –  user1415006 May 25 '12 at 5:56
    
Hi dgw, i am facing one more issue when i include this line it removes columns with blank values. I need these columns in my final output.please suggest –  user1415006 May 25 '12 at 7:26
    
@user1415006 Then just make it @array_name = grep { defined } @array_name ; this just removes undef values. –  dgw May 25 '12 at 11:01
    
If i do that...it then it keeps the column with the blank value but strangely includes two more empty columns which are NOT part of my excel sheet. –  user1415006 May 25 '12 at 12:37
$A->[$i][10]=~s/\n//g;

$variable_value =~s/\n//g;

$variable_value is the variable in which the value is stored.

It will remove the next line.

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grep basically returns all true values from the array, and 0 is interpolated as false.

For example grep is used here to filter true values into @b,

my @dirty = (0,1,2,3,,0,5,);
my @clean = grep {$_} @dirty;
for(@clean) {print "$_\n";}

Returns

1
2
3
5

A little trick for preserving the zeros involves adding a newline to the grep argument:

my @dirty = (0,1,2,3,,0,5,);
my @clean = grep {"$_\n"} @dirty;
for(@clean) {print "$_\n";}

Which returns,

0
1
2
3
0
5
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This dirty trick will not skip empty or undefined cells. –  dgw May 24 '12 at 14:31

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