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I have the following database of users where each can speak different languages on a different level.

id      langs
12      EN-21
36      EN-2,RU-3
41      EN-9
57      DE-35,EN-28
60      DE-9,RU-14

I would like to create MySQL query that counts the occurrences of every language regardless its level. The desired tab should look like this:

lang    count
EN      4
DE      2
RU      2

I already tried different combinations of this, but it's far from perfect.

SELECT 
    DISTINCT SUBSTRING_INDEX(langs, '-', 1) AS lang, 
--  COUNT(langs) as count
--  SUM(
--      (SELECT DISTINCT SUBSTRING_INDEX(langs, '-', 1) 
--      FROM people
--      WHERE langs != '')
--  )
FROM people
WHERE langs != ''
--  GROUP BY lang
ORDER BY lang
share|improve this question
    
you should reorganize table people – triclosan May 24 '12 at 14:14
    
is count of language fixed value? I see here only 3 – triclosan May 24 '12 at 14:15
2  
what if I had another row as EN-32, EN-45 then count for EN would be 5 or 6? – Fahim Parkar May 24 '12 at 14:19
    
Is there a limit to the number of possible languages in the list for a user? – mellamokb May 24 '12 at 14:42
    
@triclosan Reorganizing table is what I prefer NOT to do. In results are only 3 langs because of only 3 langs in test table, in real there are about 40. @FahimParkar This situation shouldn't occur. There should be only EN-45 because my app allows adding every language only once and it would be the one with the highest level. And in case of more different langs there are separated only by comma, not space. @mellamokb Generally no. It's of course limited by the MySQL type of the langs column. I don't see how is this related to my problem. – meridius May 27 '12 at 9:41

If there is a maximum limit to the number of languages in the set, you can pull out all the first elements, second elements, third elements, etc., and union them together. Here's an example that pulls out any first or second element from language set and combines them:

select distinct substring_index(langs, '-', 1) as lang
from people where langs != ''
union
select distinct SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX(langs, '-', 2), ',', -1)
from people where LENGTH(langs) - LENGTH(REPLACE(langs,',','')) + 1 > 1

Demo: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/b86f2/1


From there, it's a matter of combining the list of languages with the list of people and counting the number of matches, by comparing people.langs like '%EN%' for example:

select
  lang,
  count(case when people.langs like concat('%',langs.lang,'%') then 1 end) as count
from people,
  (
    select distinct substring_index(langs, '-', 1) as lang
    from people where langs != ''
    union
    select distinct SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX(langs, '-', 2), ',', -1)
    from people where LENGTH(langs) - LENGTH(REPLACE(langs,',','')) + 1 > 1
  ) langs
group by langs.lang
order by langs.lang

Sample output:

LANG    COUNT
====    ====
DE      2
EN      4
RU      2

Demo: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/b86f2/5

share|improve this answer
    
This is great, BUT as I wrote in the upper comment, the number of languages for user is theoretically unlimited. Well, it seems that I have to stick to my original plan of building the result table using PHP. It's a shame that MySQL doesn't have something like explode() in PHP. – meridius May 27 '12 at 10:11
    
Ya, MySQL (and other database engines) are generally not strong at string processing. I would agree your best bet is to process in PHP instead. – mellamokb May 28 '12 at 22:22
SELECT SUBSTRING_INDEX(langs, '-', 1) AS lang, count(1) as count_lang
FROM people
WHERE langs!=''
GROUP BY lang
ORDER BY lang

Please try this and let me know what you get.

share|improve this answer
1  
You could actually try it: sqlfiddle.com/#!2/8aae3/3. I believe the problem is not the query to count. It's that missing RU because RU only appears at second level or lower. – mellamokb May 24 '12 at 14:31

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