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do you know when you have that huge log table and you just need to see the last X rows to know what is going on at the time?

usually you can do:

select top 100 * 
from log_table
order by ID desc

to show the 100 newest records, but it will do on the inverse order (of course, because of the order by DESC), for example:

100010
100009
100008
and so on..

but for the sake of simplicity I would like to see the records on the order they happened. I can do that by running this query:

select * 
from(
    select top 100 * from log_table order by ID desc
    ) a
order by a.id

where I get my top 100 order by ID desc and then invert the result set. It works but it seems kin of unnecessary to run 2 select to produce this result.

My question is: does anyone have a better idea of doing that? Like a select top on the end of the table?

EDIT: execution plan of both queries: It seems like Alex's idea is very good but David was also right, there is only one select and one sort enter image description here

EDIT2: set statistics IO ON:

(10 row(s) affected)
Table 'sysdtslog90'. Scan count 1, logical reads 3, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 12, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.

(1 row(s) affected)

(10 row(s) affected)
Table 'sysdtslog90'. Scan count 2, logical reads 5, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 12, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.

(1 row(s) affected)
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Use ROWID() like instructed in this similar question I asked. –  zneak May 24 '12 at 14:30
    
that uses 2 selects as well –  Diego May 24 '12 at 14:32
    
I'm curious as to what you mean by "better"? Obviously you already know the standard ways to do this, but I'm not sure why you consider them to be unsatisfactory? –  Pondlife May 24 '12 at 14:36
    
I just imagine that if we find a way of running with only one select would be better than 2. Just looking for a way of improving this –  Diego May 24 '12 at 14:39
2  
Yes, but "better" in what sense? Faster execution? Less typing? Easier to read and understand the code? More aesthetically pleasing? Some things you can change, but the fundamental nature and syntax of TSQL isn't one of them :) –  Pondlife May 24 '12 at 14:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If id is indexed and sequential enough the fastest way is probably;

select * from log_table where id > (select max(id) from log_table) - N

An explicit order by is still required to guarantee the order however.

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+1 : wrong but valuable. estimated execution plan shows two table accesses, where original query only had one. –  David B May 24 '12 at 15:11
    
hi, thanks, see my screenshot. it seems you had a very good idea –  Diego May 24 '12 at 15:24

but it seems kin of unnecessary to run 2 select to produce this result.

Wrong. It is necessary.

More detail: Look at the estimated execution plan of your query. It probably looks like ClusteredIndexScan -> Top -> only one Sort. The inner query's OrderBy doesn't perform a Sort, it just directs the execution to read from the "back" of the table.

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hi it seems you were right, but so was alex. take a look at the screen shot. thanks –  Diego May 24 '12 at 15:25
    
Don't forget to add an orderby on the second query (otherwise, results can return in any order). Also, run them with SET STATISTICS IO ON and compare the logical IO. –  David B May 24 '12 at 15:29
    
I dont think the order is necessary because the index is ASC so the result will be asc as well. Well, I added it but didnt see any difference on the result. regarding IO, Im confused. See my edit, query 2 (the faster) ran more scans than query one.. –  Diego May 24 '12 at 15:39
    
If you don't specify the order, then the optimizer gets to choose the order. It is not constrained to choose the order consistently and may return different orderings on different query executions. –  David B May 24 '12 at 20:17

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