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I am passing a list of type double[] to a function in a class, editing the values within a function using a tempList, then returning the edited values. But the originalList being passed is being edited as well which I do not want them edited to match the tempList.

Here is the code.

List<double[]> newList = new List<double[]();
newList = myClass.myFunction(value, originalList);

// myClass
...

// myFunction
public List<double[]> myFunction(int value, List<double[]> myList)
{
    List<double[]> tempList = new List<double[]>();
    for (int i = 0; i < myList).Count; i++)
    {
       tempList.Add(myList[i]);
    }


    // Do stuff to edit tempList

    return tempList;
}
share|improve this question
    
What is actually your question, what do you want to do? You can edit the original list<T>, you dont need to create a new one. – Mitja Bonca May 24 '12 at 14:58

Bear in mind that arrays are reference types. When you add an array to tempList, only a reference to the array is being added, so that myList and tempList both refer to the same double[] objects.

Instead, you need to make a clone of the arrays:

for (int i = 0; i < myList.Count; i++)
{
   tempList.Add((double[])myList[i].Clone());
}
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Yes, but the code looks dodgy in the first place. Cloning an array is rarely the right thing to do. – Konrad Rudolph May 24 '12 at 14:57

An array, here double[], is a reference type, so the line

tempList.Add(myList[i]);

is adding a reference to the original array. Then when you edit tempList you're editing the original array. Make a copy like this:

tempList.Add(myList[i].ToArray());
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You are adding the reference to the array to the new list, but not making a copy of the contents of each array. Your copy should look something like this:

foreach (double[] item in myList)
{
    double[] copy = new double[item.Length];
    Array.Copy(item, copy);
    templist.Add(copy);
}
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The problem you are having is double[] is a reference type, not a value type, so when you are adding it to your tempList, you are adding a reference to the original object, not a new object. You actually need to create a new double[] before adding it to tempList so you are not working on the original object.

Assuming you can use LINQ, you do not need to loop. You can do something like:

var tempList = myList.Select(x => x.ToArray()).ToList();
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This is because Collections/reference types are passed by reference. (Actually the holding variable is passed by value, but the all variables point to same reference).

For detail explanation, read this SO Answer

If you want that modifications in my Function does not reflect in original collection, you have to copy/clone it and then pass to myFunction.

Example

newList = myClass.myFunction(value, (List<double>)originalList.Clone());
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tempList.Add(myList[i]);

means that you add the reference to the double[] object on index i to temp list. therefore, if you edit the value of that object, you will get the chances on both of the lists.

if you want to have a different cloned lists that won't affect each other you will have to do that:

List<double[]> tempList = new List<double[]>();
for (int i = 0; i < myList).Count; i++)
{
   double[] originalListItem = myList[i];

   // the most important step here!!! - clone the originalListItem to clonedListItem

   tempList.Add(clonedListItem);
}


// Do stuff to edit tempList

return tempList;
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You are copying the double[] reference to the new list, this is a shallow copy. You need a deep copy and create new double arrays to edit the temp arrays without changing the original arrays.

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You are inserting references to the array in the tempList, not a copy of the array. So if you change a value in the tempList, you are changing the original array.

This code will work better:

    for (int i = 0; i < myList.Count; i++)
    {
       var copy = new Double[myList[i].Length];
       Array.Copy(myList[i], copy, myList[i].Length);
       tempList.Add(copy);
    }
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