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In the bison manual in section 2.1.2 Grammar Rules for rpcalc, it is written that:

In each action, the pseudo-variable $$ stands for the semantic value for the grouping that the rule is going to construct. Assigning a value to $$ is the main job of most actions

Does that mean $$ is used for holding the result from a rule? like:

exp exp '+'   { $$ = $1 + $2;      }

And what's the typical usage of $$ after begin assigned to?

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+1 for me coming this page from the exact google search. –  frbry Jun 12 '12 at 18:06
    
The accepted answer is correct. I tested it. –  Amumu Jun 13 '12 at 15:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, $$ is used to hold the result of the rule. After being assigned to, it typically becomes a $x in some higher-level (or lower precedence) rule.

Consider (for example) input like 2 * 3 + 4. Assuming you follow the normal precedence rules, you'd have an action something like: { $$ = $1 * $3; }. In this case, that would be used for the 2 * 3 part and, obviously enough, assign 6 to $$. Then you'd have your { $$ = $1 + $3; } to handle the addition. For this action, $1 would be given the value 6 that you assigned to $$ in the multiplication rule.

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Does that mean $$ is used for holding the result from a rule? like:

Yes.

And what's the typical usage of $$ after begin assigned to?

Typically you won’t need that value again. Bison uses it internally to propagate the value. In your example, $1 and $2 are the respective semantic values of the two exp productions, that is, their values were set somewhere in the semantic rule for exp by setting its $$ variable.

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$$ represents the result reference of the current expression's evaluation. In other word, its result.Therefore, there's no particular usage after its assignation.

Bye !

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