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I'm using a UITableView to layout content 'pages'. I'm using the headers of the table view to layout certain images etc. and I'd prefer it if they didn't float but stayed static as they do when the style is set to UITableViewStyleGrouped.

Other then using UITableViewStyleGrouped, is there a way to do this? I'd like to avoid using grouped as it adds a margin down all my cells and requires disabling of the background view for each of the cells. I'd like full control of my layout. Ideally they'd be a UITableViewStyleBareBones, but I didn't see that option in the docs...

Many thanks,

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1  

15 Answers 15

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You should be able to fake this by using a custom cell to do your header rows. These will then scroll like any other cell in the table view.

You just need to add some logic in your cellForRowAtIndexPath to return the right cell type when it is a header row.

You'll probably have to manage your sections yourself though, i.e. have everything in one section and fake the headers. (You could also try returning a hidden view for the header view, but I don't know if that will work)

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Yeah... it seems a bit of a hack though. This seems like an oversight an Apple's part, as clearly the code is there to do it, we just need to be able to set a flag. –  Tricky Jul 2 '09 at 13:54
    
Check my answer below for the correct way to achieve the effect without any special hack, just manage the first cell of every section as its section header! –  Leo Olympian Jul 29 '13 at 22:17

A probably easier way to achieve this:

CGFloat dummyViewHeight = 40;
UIView *dummyView = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0, 0, self.tableView.bounds.size.width, dummyViewHeight)];
self.tableView.tableHeaderView = dummyView;
self.tableView.contentInset = UIEdgeInsetsMake(-dummyViewHeight, 0, 0, 0);

Section headers will now scroll just like any regular cell.

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This friggin works like a charm!! The presence of a table header view header stops the section headers from floating. And an invisible header with appropriate content insets for the table does the trick .. Thank you so much! wonder why this answer's not getting much attention –  shyambhat Jun 11 '12 at 11:45
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Still don't believe it! No private APIs, no digging into the classes, nothing! I have been facing this problem for ages and have been adding tableviews on top of scroll views (with the tableview scroll disabled), which would make the table headers scroll normally. but just started to search if apple's provided any new methods lately to fix this.. so glad i stumbled upon your answer. thanks again –  shyambhat Jun 11 '12 at 11:53
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the only drawback I saw is that top header will not be shown anymore (you can see it only through scrolling up). At least for me it is not shown –  Ruzard Dec 15 '12 at 16:49
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Unfortunately, I'm seeing the same behavior as @Ruzard. –  Joel Martinez Jan 9 '13 at 15:19
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You can still show the tableHeaderView of the table by increasing it's height on the top, by a number equal to the height of section header and reduce the content inset by the same number. –  shyambhat Aug 1 '13 at 13:57

I've described the private methods that turns of section headers floating in my blog

Basically, you just need to subclass UITableView and return YES in two of its methods:

- (BOOL) allowsHeaderViewsToFloat;
- (BOOL) allowsFooterViewsToFloat;

WARNING: this solution implements a reserved API method. This could prevent the app from being approved by Apple for distribution on the AppStore.

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13  
An answer doesn't deserve a downvote just because it references private APIs (not everybody is writing code to be submitted to the AppStore). This is doubly true when the answer happens to be correct. Subclassing (or, more easily, making a UITableView category) that returns NO for these methods stops headers from floating. If you'd like to see this added as a public API, please file a bug report: bugreport.apple.com –  jemmons Jul 19 '10 at 0:18
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If we implement that function in an App, how would Apple realize you're using a private API? From all they know, I just implemented a method in a subclass of UITableView, and they can't even see that without de-assembling the code, and it wouldn't be so easy. It's not CALLING a method in a private API, it's just implementing one.... –  Javier Soto Jan 25 '12 at 19:46
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Has anyone used this method and got approved in the App Store? –  nonamelive Jun 21 '13 at 3:57
    
Private Methods! be wary, the app will get rejected. Check my answer below for the correct way to achieve the effect –  Leo Olympian Jul 29 '13 at 22:13
    
@jemmons if you don't want me to downvote your answer mark it as "private API is used here". Sort of disclaimer :) –  purrrminator Oct 29 '13 at 11:53

Ok, i know it is late but i had to do it. I have spent 10 hours by now searching for a working solution but did not find a complete answer. Did found some hints but difficult for starters to understand. So i had to put in my 2 cents and complete the answer.

As it has been suggested in the few of the answers the only working solution that i was able to implement is by inserting normal cells in the table view and handle them as Section Headers, but the better way to achieve it is by inserting these cells at row 0 of every section. This way we can handle these custom non-floating headers very easily.

So, the steps are.

  1. Implement UITableView with style UITableViewStylePlain.

    -(void) loadView
    {
        [super loadView];
    
        UITableView *tblView =[[UITableView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0, frame.origin.y, frame.size.width, frame.size.height-44-61-frame.origin.y) style:UITableViewStylePlain];
        tblView.delegate=self;
        tblView.dataSource=self;
        tblView.tag=2;
        tblView.backgroundColor=[UIColor clearColor];
        tblView.separatorStyle = UITableViewCellSeparatorStyleNone;
    }
    
  2. Implement titleForHeaderInSection as usual ( you can get this value by using your own logic, but I prefer to use standard delegates ).

    - (NSString *)tableView: (UITableView *)tableView titleForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section
    {
        NSString *headerTitle = [sectionArray objectAtIndex:section];
        return headerTitle;
    }
    
  3. Immplement numberOfSectionsInTableView as usual

    - (NSInteger)numberOfSectionsInTableView:(UITableView *)tableView 
    {
        int sectionCount = [sectionArray count];
        return sectionCount;
    }
    
  4. Implement numberOfRowsInSection as usual.

    - (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView numberOfRowsInSection:(NSInteger)section 
    {
        int rowCount = [[cellArray objectAtIndex:section] count];
        return rowCount +1; //+1 for the extra row which we will fake for the Section Header
    }
    
  5. Return 0.0f in heightForHeaderInSection.

    - (CGFloat)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView heightForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section
    {
        return 0.0f;
    }
    
  6. DO NOT implement viewForHeaderInSection. Remove the method completely instead of returning nil.

  7. In heightForRowAtIndexPath. Check if(indexpath.row == 0) and return the desired cell height for the section header, else return the height of the cell.

    - (CGFloat)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView heightForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
    {
        if(indexPath.row == 0)
        {
            return 80; //Height for the section header
        }
        else
        {
            return 70; //Height for the normal cell
        }
    }
    
  8. Now in cellForRowAtIndexPath, check if(indexpath.row == 0) and implement the cell as you want the section header to be and set the selection style to none. ELSE implement the cell as you want the normal cell to be.

    - (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
    {
        if (indexPath.row == 0)
        {
            UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"SectionCell"];
            if (cell == nil)
            {
                cell = [[[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:@"SectionCell"] autorelease];
                cell.selectionStyle = UITableViewCellSelectionStyleNone; //So that the section header does not appear selected
    
                cell.backgroundView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithImage:[UIImage imageNamed:@"SectionHeaderBackground"]];
            }
    
            cell.textLabel.text = [tableView.dataSource tableView:tableView titleForHeaderInSection:indexPath.section];
    
            return cell;
        }
        else
        {
            UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"Cell"];
    
            if (cell == nil) 
            {
                cell = [[[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:@"Cell"] autorelease];
                cell.selectionStyle = UITableViewCellSelectionStyleGray; //So that the normal cell looks selected
    
                cell.backgroundView =[[[UIImageView alloc] initWithImage:[UIImage imageNamed:@"CellBackground"]]autorelease];
                cell.selectedBackgroundView=[[[UIImageView alloc] initWithImage:[UIImage imageNamed:@"SelectedCellBackground"]] autorelease];
            }
    
            cell.textLabel.text = [[cellArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.section] objectAtIndex:indexPath.row -1]; //row -1 to compensate for the extra header row
    
            return cell;
        }
    }
    
  9. Now implement willSelectRowAtIndexPath and return nil if indexpath.row == 0. This will care that didSelectRowAtIndexPath never gets fired for the Section header row.

    - (NSIndexPath *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView willSelectRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
    {
        if (indexPath.row == 0)
        {
            return nil;
        }
    
        return indexPath;
    }
    
  10. And finally in didSelectRowAtIndexPath, check if(indexpath.row != 0) and proceed.

    - (void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView didSelectRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
    {
        if (indexPath.row != 0)
        {
            int row = indexPath.row -1; //Now use 'row' in place of indexPath.row
    
            //Do what ever you want the selection to perform
        }
    }
    

With this you are done. You now have a perfectly scrolling, non-floating section header.

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This is the only solution that worked for me. Great answer. –  yar1vn Jan 19 '13 at 20:57
    
Implemented 'willSelectRowAtIndexPath' so that the control never reaches 'didSelectRowAtIndexPath' on selecting the Section Header row. –  Leo Olympian Jan 24 '13 at 19:56
    
Actually, I fold + unfold the rows when the header is selected. But good to know you can do that –  yar1vn Jan 24 '13 at 20:36
    
Great answer, but why the 'if (indexPath.row != 0)' check in 'didSelectRowAtIndexPath'? Is it just to be extra secure? The row can never be 0 with your 'willSelectRowAtIndexPath' implementation, right? –  Glenn85 Aug 21 '13 at 12:28
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@Glenn85, Sorry for the late reply. Yes it is just for an extra security. –  Leo Olympian Nov 28 '13 at 3:15

The interesting thing about UITableViewStyleGrouped is that the tableView adds the style to the cells and not to the TableView.

The style is added as backgroundView to the cells as a class called UIGroupTableViewCellBackground which handles drawing different background according to the position of the cell in the section.

So a very simple solution will be to use UITableViewStyleGrouped, set the backgroundColor of the table to clearColor, and simply replace the backgroundView of the cell in cellForRow:

cell.backgroundView = [[[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:cell.bounds] autorelease];
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This should be the top answer. There is a blog post about it here: corecocoa.wordpress.com/2011/09/17/… –  Sam Mar 28 '12 at 14:05
    
This solution do not really work. I keep getting an extra space around at the around cells. Any idea ? –  gsempe Sep 12 '12 at 14:34
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Wouldn't the contentView of the cells still be shifted to the right? –  Piotr Tomasik Oct 30 '12 at 11:46

Change Table style from plain to grouped

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This is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  ninjudd Dec 2 at 19:15

Although this may not solve your problem, it did for me when I wanted to do a similar thing. Instead of setting the header I used the footer of the section above. What saved me was that this section was small and static in nature, so it never scrolled below the bottom of the view.

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Great idea. I love this hack. –  Steve Moser Jan 31 '12 at 21:21
    
kinda funny. appreciate the idea, but a hack is a hack. the headers would start floating at the bottom so doesn't really solve the problem –  shyambhat Jun 11 '12 at 11:56

While thinking how to approach this problem, I remembered a very important detail about UITableViewStyleGrouped. The way UITableView implements the grouped style (the rounded borders around the cells) is by adding a custom backgroundView to the UITableViewCells, and not to the UITableView. Each cell is added a backgroundView according to its position in the section (upper rows get the upper part of the section border, middle ones get the side border and the bottom one gets – well, the bottom part). So, if we just want a plain style, and we don’t have a custom backgroundView for our cells (which is the case in 90% of the times), then all we need to do is use UITableViewStyleGrouped, and remove the custom background. This can be done by following those two steps:

Change our tableView style to UITableViewStyleGrouped Add the following line to cellForRow, just before we return the cell:

cell.backgroundView=[[[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:cell.bounds] autorelease];

And that’s it. The tableView style will become exactly like UITableViewStylePlain, except for the floating headers.

Hope this helps!

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Check the answer how to implement headers with StoryBoard: Table Header Views in StoryBoards

Also notice that if you don't implement

viewForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section

it will not float which is exactly what you want.

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Ignore XAK. Do not explore any private methods if you want your app to have the chance of being accepted by apple.

This is easiest if you are using Interface Builder. You would add a UIView at the top of the view (where the images will go), then add your tableview below that. IB should size it accordingly; that is, the top of the tableview touches the bottom of the UIView you've just added and it's height covers the rest of the screen.

The thinking here is that if that UIView is not actually part of the table view, it will not scroll with the tableview. i.e. ignore the tableview header.

If you're not using interface builder, it's a little more complicated because you've got to get the positioning and height correct for the tableview.

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This doesn't answer the question. Tricky is referring to the titleHeaderViews which are the views that sit between the cells, not the table header view which is what you seem to be suggesting. –  Daniel Wood Jun 15 '10 at 13:52

This can be achieved by assigning the header view manually in the UITableViewController's viewDidLoad method instead of using the delegate's viewForHeaderInSection and heightForHeaderInSection. For example in your subclass of UITableViewController, you can do something like this:

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];

    UILabel *headerView = [[UILabel alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0, 0, 0, 40)];
    [headerView setBackgroundColor:[UIColor magentaColor]];
    [headerView setTextAlignment:NSTextAlignmentCenter];
    [headerView setText:@"Hello World"];
    [[self tableView] setTableHeaderView:headerView];
}

The header view will then disappear when the user scrolls. I don't know why this works like this, but it seems to achieve what you're looking to do.

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This isn't for a section, this is for 1 header at the top. –  makdad Jan 16 '13 at 0:34

To remove the floating section header sections completely, you can do this:

- (UIView *) tableView:(UITableView *)tableView viewForHeaderInSection:(NSInteger)section
{
    return [[UIView alloc] init];
}

return nil doesn't work.

To disable floating but still show section headers you can provide a custom view with its own behaviours.

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Another way to do it is to make an empty section right before the one you want the header on and put your header on that section. Because the section is empty the header will scroll immediately.

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I have another even simpler solution, to be used without autolayout and with everything done through the XIB :

1/ Put your header in the tableview by drag and dropping it directly on the tableview.

2/ In the Size Inspector of the newly made header, just change its autosizing : you should only leave the top, left and right anchors, plus the fill horizontally.

That's how it should be set for the header

That should do the trick !

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you can easily achieve this by implementing the viewForHeaderInSection method in the tableview delegate class. this method expects a UIView as return object (which is your header view). i have done this same thing in my code

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I have also done this, the view that is returned still floats when you scroll... –  Tricky Jul 2 '09 at 12:31
    
The original poster doesn't want a custom header. They want a header that doesn't "float" at the top of the table. Your suggestion still floats. –  jemmons Jul 19 '10 at 0:05
    
change the tableview to UITableViewStyleGrouped with viewforheader, then it will make it stop –  mskw Apr 22 at 1:56

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