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I cannot figure out why this does not alert me at least once when I visit www.reuters.com. Am I missing something?

// ==UserScript==
// @name        test3
// @namespace   test3
// @version     1
// ==/UserScript==

$(document).ready(function () {

    var actualHost = window.location.toString();
    var intendedHost = "www.reuters.com";

    alert("Debug 1 - " + actualHost);

    if (actualHost == intendedHost) {
        alert("Debug 2 - " + actualHost);
    }

});

Thank you.

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

does not work is a really bad description of a problem..

anyway, i see one issue here. try this:

// ==UserScript==
// @name        test3
// @namespace   test3
// @version     1
// @include     *reuters.com*
// ==/UserScript==

loadDependancies(function () {

    var actualHost = unsafeWindow.location.toString();
    var intendedHost = "www.reuters.com";

    alert("Debug 1 - " + actualHost);


    if (actualHost == intendedHost) {
        alert("Debug 2 - " + actualHost);
    }


});

You need to use the @include directive that tells GM where the script should run. You should use unsafeWindow to access the window object of that page

you also need to load jquery if it doesnt already exist on the page:

DEBUG = true

function addScript(url){
    var s = document.createElement('script');
    s.src = url;
    s.type = 'text/javascript';
    document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild(s);
}

function log(msg){
  if(DEBUG){
    unsafeWindow.console && unsafeWindow.console.log(msg);
  }
}

function loadDependancies(boostrapFn) {

  addScript('jquery CDN url goes here..');

  var check = function(){
    log("waiting for dependancies to load: "+ typeof unsafeWindow.jQuery);
    if(typeof unsafeWindow.jQuery == 'undefined'){
      window.setTimeout(check, 500);
    }    else {
      jQuery = $ = unsafeWindow.jQuery;
      boostrapFn();
    }
  }
  check();
}

thats your new script. it will load jquery for you to use

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for input. I mean that none of the alerts trigger and I cannot figure out why. –  derek8 May 24 '12 at 15:07
    
you forgot the include directive. take a look at any other working GM script –  mkoryak May 24 '12 at 15:08
    
Hmm, still not alerting for me. –  derek8 May 24 '12 at 15:11
1  
ah, you never loaded jquery. let me provide you with a loader –  mkoryak May 24 '12 at 15:12
1  
maybe - // @require code.jquery.com/jquery-1.7.2.min.js –  derek8 May 24 '12 at 15:12
show 1 more comment
  1. In order to use jQuery, you must load jQuery.
  2. $(document).ready() is not required in most Greasemonkey scripts as Greasemonkey fires at the appropriate time by default.

So the simplest version of the script becomes:

// ==UserScript==
// @name        test3
// @namespace   test3
// @require     http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.2/jquery.min.js
// ==/UserScript==

var actualHost = window.location.toString();
var intendedHost = "www.reuters.com";

alert("Debug 1 - " + actualHost);

if (actualHost == intendedHost) {
    alert("Debug 2 - " + actualHost);
}

Note:

  1. Use @require whenever possible (which is almost always).

    1. @require puts a copy of the script on the local machine, so your script runs faster and is not dependent on an external server for every single run.
    2. @require maintains sandbox security/separation, so your script is safe from side-effects or attacks from the target page
    3. @require lets your script function even if you've disabled all of the target page's javascript -- a very valuable technique.
    4. @require even ports to Chrome, if you use the excellent Tampermonkey extension.



    Other, convoluted, methods for adding jQuery have multiple problems:

    1. They are an unnecessary Security risk.
    2. They make your script unnecessarily dependent on external servers for every single run!
    3. They slow your script down.
    4. They make using GM's excellent functions like GM_xmlhttpRequest() and GM_setValue(), impossible or much more difficult.
    5. They tie your script down to the vagaries of the target page's JS execution.


  2. Always give your script appropriate @include, @exclude, and/or @match directives, so that it will only run on the desired page(s).

  3. Consider using console.log() instead of alert(). It's much less intrusive for debugging.

share|improve this answer
    
Great bit of info there, thank you –  derek8 May 25 '12 at 7:55
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