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I have a class like this

Public Class Settings

        Private _app_folder As String = ""
        Public Property AppFolder() As String
            Get
                Return _app_folder
            End Get
            Set(ByVal value As String)
                _app_folder = value
            End Set
        End Property [...]

Then in another class, I declare it

_settings = New Settings

and I set the value for each property

_settings.AppFolder = "test"

But how can I edit "_settings.AppFolder" property to "readonly" ?

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2  
Your title does not match your question. There is no inheritance in your question. Furthermore, it is not clear what you are trying to achieve. Are you trying to make the AppFolder property ReadOnly once it has been set? Or do you want to make AppFolder ReadOnly always? –  RB. May 24 '12 at 15:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In addition to RB's answer you could implement an interface and use that (rather than the class) when you require read-only behavior of the property.

Public Interface IReadonlySettings
    ReadOnly Property AppFolder() As String
End Interface

Public Class Settings
    Implements IReadonlySettings

    Private m_AppFolder As String

    Public Property AppFolder() As String
        Get
            Return m_AppFolder
        End Get
        Set
            m_AppFolder = Value
        End Set
    End Property

    private readonly Property ReadonlyAppFolder() As String implements IReadonlySettings.AppFolder
        Get
            Return m_AppFolder
        End Get
    End Property

End Class
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If you want to make AppFolder always ReadOnly, you can simply declare it so:

Private _app_folder As String = ""
Public ReadOnly Property AppFolder() As String
    Get
        Return _app_folder
    End Get
End Property [...]

If you want to make it ReadOnly in a subclass, then you can only do this by throwing an exception whenever client code attempts to set it - it is not possible to remove the setter for a subclass.

Public Class SubSettings inherits Settings
    Private _app_folder As String = ""
    Public Property AppFolder() As String
        Get
            Return _app_folder
        End Get
        Set(ByVal value As String)
            throw new Exception ("This property cannot be set")
        End Set
    End Property [...]

Finally, if you want to make it ReadOnly following it's initial set:

    Private _app_folder As String = ""
    Private hasBeenSet as Boolean = False;
    Public Property AppFolder() As String
        Get
            Return _app_folder
        End Get
        Set(ByVal value As String)
            If (hasBeenSet)
                throw new Exception ("This property cannot be set")
            Else
                hasBeenSet = true
                _app_folder = value
            EndIf
        End Set
    End Property [...]
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One other option is to change the access of the property's Set - it can be different than Get. For example, you could declare the property Public but declare Set to be Protected. In this case anyone can read the property, but only the class itself and its derivatives can write the property. Declaring the Set to be Friend would allow the class itself and any other class in the same assembly to write the property.

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use ReadOnly keyword

Public ReadOnly Property AppFolder() As String
        Get
            Return _app_folder
        End Get
    End Property 
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If you are indeed talking about inheritance then the answer is – you can’t. This would break inheritance: your derived class object is-a base class object. So if you have classes Derived and Base there is no possible way to make this code not compile:

Dim d As Base = New Derived()
d.SomeProperty = SomeValue

This must work.

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