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How does shovel (<<) operator work in Ruby Hashes?

Struggling to find documentation on why this works the way it does:

1 def test_default_value_is_the_same_object
2    hash = Hash.new([])
3
4    hash[:one] << "uno"
5    hash[:two] << "dos"
6
7    assert_equal ["uno", "dos"], hash[:one]
8    assert_equal ["uno", "dos"], hash[:two]
9    assert_equal ["uno", "dos"], hash[:three]
10
11   assert_equal true, hash[:one].object_id == hash[:two].object_id
12 end

I would have thought that "uno" would be assigned to the hash[:one] key and hash[:two] would receive "dos". I've corrected it so that it passes the tests, however I don't know why it is operating this way. Could someone point out what I'm missing or direct me to relevant documentation on this particular aspect. Thanks.

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marked as duplicate by Niklas B., steenslag, Mark Thomas, Andrew Marshall, Holger Just May 24 '12 at 20:45

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2 Answers

There's no :one key, as well as :two key. Trying to access value under any of these keys returns a default value, i.e. array, the one you've initialized the Hash with in the Hash.new([]).

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I would have thought that "uno" would be assigned to the hash[:one] key and hash[:two] would receive "dos"

They are not assigned (=), they are pushed (<<) into hash[:one].

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1  
I just found this link stackoverflow.com/questions/9343680/… that explained it all, thank you! –  Tom May 24 '12 at 15:56
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