Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following code:

namespace C {
    class X {};
}

namespace A {
    class X {};

    namespace B {
        using namespace C;

        X x;
    }
}

I was expecting the type of x to be C::X due to the using namespace directive, but instead both VS2010 and online LLVM/Clang compiler resolve X within the namespace B to be A::X. Changing the using directive with a using declaration (using C::X), then it does resolve to C::X as expected.

The standard says on using directives [7.3.4.2]:

A using-directive specifies that the names in the nominated namespace can be used in the scope in which the using-directive appears after the using-directive. During unqualified name lookup (3.4.1), the names appear as if they were declared in the nearest enclosing namespace which contains both the using-directive and the nominated namespace.

My reading of this is that C::X should appear as if declared within namespace B, effectively hiding A::X. Which section(s) of the standard are behind this inconsistency between using directives and using declarations? Is there any way to hide a name from an outer scope by a using directive?

share|improve this question
5  
Maybe the clue is in the names appear as if they were declared in the nearest enclosing namespace which contains both the using-directive and the nominated namespace. Would that not be ::? And if so, would A::X not be found first (lookup goes from the inner namespace out)... not sure, though, but g++ does also pickup A::X, so it is very consistent across compilers. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 24 '12 at 16:28
    
@David Rodríguez - dribeas: Oh, that would explain it... –  K-ballo May 24 '12 at 16:31
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The chapter on using directive seems to be somehow clear that you are seeing the expected behavior:

7.3.4p2 A using-directive specifies that the names in the nominated namespace can be used in the scope in which the using-directive appears after the using-directive. During unqualified name lookup (3.4.1), the names appear as if they were declared in the nearest enclosing namespace which contains both the using-directive and the nominated namespace.

7.3.4p3 A using-directive does not add any members to the declarative region in which it appears.

That is, the using-directive adds the members of the namespace to the lookup set of the common namespace ancestor of the directive and the used namespace, not directly to the scope where the using-directive is used. This is explicitly stated in the second quote: it does not add any members to the declarative region of the using-directive.

Later there is an example that is meant to illustrate something else but actually shows this:

7.3.4p4 [...] For another example

namespace A {
  int i;
}
namespace B {
  int i;
  int j;
  namespace C {
    namespace D {
      using namespace A;
      int j;
      int k;
      int a = i; // B::i hides A::i
    }

That last example is used to clarify transitivity (and contains more code), but it actually is equivalent to your code once you remove the extra code.

So it seems that in your case, the using-directive is not hiding, but rather being hidden.

share|improve this answer
    
So for my second question, I'm assuming it is possible to hide names by using directives but only if they are in an outer scope of the common namespace ancestor. –  K-ballo May 24 '12 at 16:44
    
I would say so. At any rate, I would avoid using-directives altogether, and only use using-declarations rarely. Lookup just becomes much more complicated and it is harder to determine what is exactly being used, where it is defined... If your need is flattening the use of complex nested namespaces, consider namespace aliases. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 24 '12 at 17:24
    
I avoid using-directives in my real code, this is just an attempt to 'find where a class lives' by leveraging name lookup rules. –  K-ballo May 24 '12 at 17:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.